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Everett Lang

September 20, 2021

Degrees

2010, B.A. (Hons) Literae Humaniores, University of Oxford

2018, M.A. Ancient Greek and Latin, Boston College

Bio

Everett Lang studies Ancient Greek and Latin literature, primarily from the Roman Imperial period, and its later reception in Early Modern Britain and northern Europe.


Audrey J. Gibson

September 16, 2021

Degrees

2021, BA English, Centenary College of Louisiana

2021, BA French, Centenary College of Louisiana

Bio

Audrey Gibson is a first-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. She is broadly interested in 20th century American literature, with particular emphasis on Southern and multiethnic writing. Her previous research has focused on French-language poetry, particularly Afro-Creole literature, situated in New Orleans during the Civil War and Reconstruction. This research explored the construction of identity and community through language, publication, education, religion, and political involvement.


Madison (Madi) Hester

August 24, 2021

Degrees

2018, B.A. English Literature, Colorado Mesa University

2020, M.A. English, Colorado State University

Bio

I am a Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. I research recent contemporary American literature from 2000 to present, and am absorbed by questions about mixed-race identity, and how multiethnic and multicultural subjects “rightly” identify themselves and are identified. I also examine what makes writing literary, who creates literature, and how digital media challenges and expands those definitions.


Sarah Lofstrom

August 9, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, Mount Holyoke College

Bio

My scholarly interests naturally converge around questions of trauma, ethics, affect, and divergent subjectivities in narratives of resistance and reconciliation. My work is grounded in an intersectional feminist hermeneutic lens to explore the role of gender, sexuality, and settler colonialism in texts by contemporary American multiethnic women writers. I am also interested in speculative imagery and it’s significance in illuminating historically silenced facets of subjectivity. Psychoanalytic criticisms surrounding haunting and trauma, in conjunction with an exploration of queer women’s psyches as sites for potential violence or intimacy are also uniquely compelling to me. My work asks how/why ‘deviant affects’ are labeled as such, and why the burden of silencing those affects largely falls on “marginalized” folks, i.e. queer and trans women of color?


Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena (they/she) is a disruptor, PhD student, and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature also earning a graduate certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies. Meleena is the administrative research assistant for the Sexuality Studies Program and the co-director of Social Media in the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab. Additionally, Meleena was a recent recipient of the Fall 2021 Latina/o Studies Program teaching affiliate fellowship. Meleena’s research focuses on contemporary LatinX literature, queer theory and sexuality studies, and the environmental humanities. They are interested in the impact of environmental degradation on at-risk communities, debility, and rhetorics of advocacy. Their work is attuned to alternative ways of knowing and botanical epistemologies, specifically looking at what minute lifeforms can teach us about futurity. Also within their scope is the evaluation of sadomasochistic paradigms in the construction and understanding of the sociopolitical subject. Meleena describes their apparently disparate interests as being the connective tissue of their larger project: healing; however, and wherever it can be created. Outside of academia, Meleena is a nature enthusiast, a friend of strays, and a celebrator of quirks and kinks. They aim to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.


Teaching Awards

Fall 2021 Latina/o Studies Graduate Teaching Affiliate Fellowship


Anthony DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

Bio

Tony DiNardo is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Their main area of research deals with the value positionings of, and the cultural work performed by, the fantastic from the medieval romance to modern genre fantasy and science fiction. They have also done more conventional work in medieval and early modern theological and devotional thought from Wyclif to Donne. Other interests of theirs include Stuart historiography, faith and labor in the Victorian social novel, the poetry of the Irish literary revival, and video game narratives.


Jonathan Albrite

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2008, BA English, James Madison University

2020, MA English, James Madison University

Bio

Broadly interested in posthumanism, ecocriticism, and affect theory, John’s research explores how nonhuman agents have shaped the literature and film of America’s long twentieth century. At the same time, he studies the productive tension between posthumanism’s push to consider nonhuman lives and the ongoing work of critical race, gender, and disability scholars, who advocate for the human lives ignored by systems of power.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rose Steptoe

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, BA English and History, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

Rose Steptoe is a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the graduate communications editor for the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab housed within UNC’s ECL Department. Her focus is in film studies, and she is interested in exploring questions of gender and sexuality, affect, authorship, and genre in audiovisual media. Her recent research has focused on women directors within the horror genre.


Mindy Buchanan-King

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, MA English, College of Charleston

2001, BA Mass Communications, Emory & Henry College

Bio

Mindy Buchanan-King is pursuing her Ph.D. in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill and is a teaching fellow. Mindy is originally from Virginia and received her B.A. from Emory & Henry College and her M.A. from the College of Charleston. Her master’s thesis focused on Edith Wharton’s use of Romanticism in conceptualizing the artistic self in Hudson River Bracketed. Her graduate research is currently focused on questions of photography and medicine in late 19th-/early 20th-century U.S. literature, artistic conceptualizations and the history of “disfigurement,” and representations and interpretations of World War I les gueules cassées (“men with broken faces”) in wartime medical photography, illustrations, and narratives. She is pursuing the graduate certificate in Literature, Medicine, and Culture.

Mindy is a contributing editor for Iris: The Art and Literary Journal at UNC, is a co-coordinator of the Furst Forum, and is the recipient of a Latina/o Studies Teaching Award. She also volunteers as a transcriber on the original manuscript of Edith Wharton’s Hudson River Bracketed, for The Complete Works of Edith Wharton to be published by Oxford University Press.


Publications:

  • Buchanan-King, Mindy. “Joan Crawford: Problematizing the (Aging) Female Image and Sexuality in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2019): 1-23.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Eddie A. Moore

October 21, 2019
Photo of Eddie Moore, taken by Sarah Boyd

Degrees

2008, BA English, North Carolina Central University

2011, MA English, North Carolina Central University

Bio

Eddie Moore is a passionate researcher and activist-teacher whose goals beyond teaching English curriculum include empowering students to think critically about the world they inhabit and the ways in which they might be actively in shaping it for greater diversity and inclusion.

Mr. Moore’s research interest include 20th Century African American Literature, Critical Theory and Cultural Studies (with specific emphasis on Masculinity Studies), Critical Race Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Medical Humanities. Primarily, his work is an interdisciplinary exploration of the utility of fictional representations of wellness outcomes among marginalized groups such as black queer men. Mr. Moore devotes a significant amount of his study to the work of James Baldwin, Samuel Delany, and other writers of black queer fiction. A crucial aim of his studies is to reclaim African American fiction from marginal positions among literary canons, as important theoretic and philosophical articulations of black and black queer experiences. These texts argue the connectedness of group body politics to politics of the national body.


Teaching Awards

2019 Innaugural J. Lee Greene Award for Outstanding Research in Race & Ethnicity

2017-2018 Erica Lindenmann Award for Teaching in Composition


Awards

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship finalist


Curriculum Vitae / Resume