Savannah Bateman

September 16, 2019
Photo of Savannah Bateman

Degrees

BA English, Western Carolina University

Bio

Savannah is an M.A. student at UNC with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She is from the small town of Kitty Hawk, located on the Outer Banks, NC. She earned her B.A. in English Literature and two minors in biology and chemistry from Western Carolina University. As an undergraduate, she was primarily interested in interdisciplinary research in literature, science, and medicine. She has a work history in the Emergency Medical Services and medical transportation services, which primarily drives her research interests in the health humanities, focusing on bibliotherapy techniques in chaotic work environments, trauma theory, and rhetorical analysis of the metaphorical language and personal narratives of EMS providers.


Nora Augustine

September 9, 2019

Degrees

2011, B.A. in English Language and Literature (Honors), University of Chicago.

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature with interests across a wide range of academic disciplines. In the past, I have held research and/or teaching positions in literature, composition, women’s and gender studies, LGBTQ+ studies, popular culture, health/medical writing, public policy, developmental psychology, and urban education. My current research tracks the circulation of “Mad Genius” mythology in twentieth-century American culture to now, investigating how popular media—especially auto/biographical writing—has imagined a link between psychiatric disability and exceptional creativity, intelligence, and other gifts or talents. My dissertation, “Extra/Ordinary Minds: Confronting ‘Mad Genius’ Mythology in Contemporary Women’s Memoirs,” draws from feminist critiques of science and medicine to explore the sociocultural factors (i.e., systemic sexism and ableism, but also class privilege and white supremacy) that compel women writers with mental illness to construct romanticized Mad Genius personae in their best-selling memoirs. Through readings of Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted (1993), Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation (1994), and Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind (1995), I argue that women’s autobiographical literature depicts Mad Genius mythology as a deceptively effective, but ultimately unsustainable framework through which to cope with psychic pain.


Publications:

  • “Broken Promise: Depression as Ex-Gifted Girl Identity in Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation.” In The Faces of Depression in Literature, ed. Josefa Ros Velasco (Peter Lang, forthcoming).

Teaching Awards

  • Krista Turner Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018.

Awards

  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, 2019–2020.
  • Summer Research Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019.
  • Travel Award, American Comparative Literature Association, 2019.
  • Blyden Jackson and Roberta Jackson Graduate Fellowship, 2013–2014.

Emily Long

September 9, 2019
Photo of Emily Long

Degrees

2019, B.S. Biology, Second Major in English with Highest Honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Emily is a Master’s student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She combines her dual interests in medicine and literature through her work in the medical humanities. Emily’s current research focuses on pre-trauma theory in nineteenth-century American literature.


Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. student in the English and Comparative Literature Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Doug’s dissertation explores the epistemological pre-conditions for forms of play and game in both the post-war military-industrial complex and the post-war avant-garde: paradigms of thought that shaped not only the video game and so-called gamification as we know it today but also contemporary experimental artistic practices. Otherwise, his research concerns twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film, and new media always with an eye to questions of embodiment, mediation, and constructions of the human. He has publications/forthcoming work on the video game’s influence on the novel, neoliberalism’s concomitant relationship with ludic logics, and Octavia Butler’s troubling Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the course will be oriented around video games and other forms of play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Beyond Afrofuturism: A Special Issue of Extrapolation. (Forthcoming 2020)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2020)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

MA, Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies, The University of Alabama

BA, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature, medicine, and culture. She completed her master’s thesis, “‘They are gone to read upon me’: The Donnean Body-Text”, with the Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies in 2013. After graduating, she worked as an editor and writer for the Institute for Rural Health Research. Her recent work has focused on physician-patient exchanges and early modern treatment of the corpse.


Karah M. Mitchell

February 4, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I focus on pre-1900 American literature and have a special interest in historical poetics, histories of natural science, critical animal studies, Native American literature, and transatlantic Romanticism.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer (forthcoming), roundtable article from MLA 2019

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Writing Program Professional Development Award, Fall 2018 & Spring 2019

Awards

  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, MEMS UNC, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate teaching fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume