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Laura Crook

October 5, 2022

Degrees

2022, BA English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2022, BS Biology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Laura is a master’s student studying Literature, Medicine & Culture. Her research interests focus on experiences of pregnancy, labor, delivery, and parenting. She is especially interested in the conjunction of broader social forces with the lived experiences of individual birthing people. Her capstone project examines the language used by birthing people during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Laura received degrees in English and Biology from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. As an undergraduate student, she spent time studying early modern false pregnancies as well as gene therapeutics.


Kaleigh Sullivan

August 29, 2022

Degrees

2021, BA English, Brenau University

Bio

I am a Master’s student and Graduate Research Assistant at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. After completing my undergraduate degree at Brenau University (Gainesville, Ga) in 2021, I spent one year teaching the Fundamentals of English as an adjunct instructor at Lanier Technical College (Gainesville, Ga). Now, at UNC-CH, I am continuing to explore my interests in the Health Humanities and psychopathology through the Literature, Medicine, and Culture (LMC) Program and assistantship in the HHIVE Lab.


Awards

Master’s Merit Assistantship, University of North Carolina- Chapel Hill, 2021 Outstanding Graduate of English, Brenau University, 2021


Kara Rush

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2022, MA English, Virginia Tech

2019, BA English, Virginia Commonwealth University

Bio

Kara Rush is a first-year Ph.D. student specializing in early modern literature. In particular, Rush is interested in how early modern author’s used nature, elements, and bodies to speak against political authority norms and to interrogate the parameters of British national identity. Other interests include adaptation studies, late medieval literature, post-colonial theory, and critical race studies.


Awards

  • Caroline Pace Chermside Award for Best Master’s Thesis: Virginia Tech, 2022

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Adrin Martin

August 2, 2022

Degrees

2021, English BA, Minor in Communication, Texas A&M University at College Station

Bio

As a relatively new student to rhetoric and composition, my research interests are ever-evolving. My undergraduate thesis examined the implications of metaphor as used in Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder treatment texts, which was a study intended to dissect language as a tool that demands authorial sacrifice. Here, I found a fascination with how meaning “seeps” from figures of speech in ways both beneficial and harmful to the reader, as well as for how engaging with language offers a view into a site of endless, yet interesting, compromises.

While my thesis oriented me within health and disability studies, my interests extend to digital rhetorics, game studies, technology discourse, and film and tv. Some topics in these fields that encapsulate my interests include the study of review scores as aggregated on websites like Metacritic and Rotten Tomatoes, observing the rhetorical nature of industry competition (MCU vs DCEU, XBox vs Playstation, Apple vs Samsung), and discussing accessibility in near-universal technologies like streaming services, smartphones, and gaming.


Awards

  • Tarheel Writing Guide Professional Development Award
  • Undergraduate Research Scholar, Texas A&M University
  • 2021 Rhetoric and Discourse Studies Essay Contest Winner, Texas A&M University
  • Gathright Phi Kappa Phi Dean’s Excellence Award Semi-Finalist

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Everett Lang

September 20, 2021

Degrees

2010, B.A. (Hons) Literae Humaniores, University of Oxford

2018, M.A. Ancient Greek and Latin, Boston College

Bio

Everett Lang studies Ancient Greek and Latin literature, primarily from the Roman Imperial period, and its later reception in Early Modern Britain and northern Europe.


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Karah M. Mitchell

July 13, 2020

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I am a PhD candidate studying American literature of the long nineteenth century. In my dissertation project, “The Call of Kind”: Humanizing the Animal in American Literature, 1830-1918, I am exploring the influence of literary texts upon the development of humane education and the pet industry in the United States. Moving from Sarah Josepha Hale’s 1830 poem “Mary’s Lamb” to the establishment of the Jack London Club by the Massachusetts SPCA in 1918, my project considers how poetry, pet autobiographies, and fiction were all primary means by which writers humanized animals, thereby influencing material changes that were made to improve animal welfare; I postulate that works now deemed “literary” accounted in large part for the rise in “humane” discourse, the modern pet industry, and small-animal veterinary practices. By attending to the profoundly influential role that humanization has played in the development of humane discourse and animal welfare, I wish to build upon and complicate recent posthumanist-driven arguments in the field of American literary studies.

In my future work, I am interested in exploring how we might connect the field of animal studies with modern veterinary science; I thus wish to connect theory with practice with respect to animal care. I would ultimately like to develop ways for placing literary studies and veterinary science into more direct conversation with one another in a manner that is similar to, yet different from, the medical humanities.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer: A Journal of Thoreau Studies, Vol. 27, 2019

Review of Antoine Traisnel’s Capture: American Pursuits and the Making of a New Animal Condition (University of Minnesota Press, 2020) for Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology (Winter 2022, Vol. 30, No. 1)

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, UNC Chancellor’s Awards, 2022


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten Voelkner is a third-year PhD student in the department of English and Comparative Literature and serves as the Web Coordinator for the UNC Latina/o Studies Program. Her primary interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary Latinx literature. Recent publications of hers can be found in Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, and The Trumpeter: Journal of Ecosophy. She is currently at work researching for her dissertation, which investigates the ways in which Latinx writers experiment with aesthetics of horror, dread, anxiety, and other ‘bad’ affects associated with the climate crisis. In this regard, she hopes to explore the affective ecologies of Latinx environmental literature and film as they offer ways of thinking within and beyond the Anthropocene.

Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)

Paul Blom

May 6, 2019

Degrees

2010, MA English, DePaul University

2008, BA English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Originally from LaGrange, GA, Paul is primarily interested in American literature from 1865 to the present and its intersection with medical humanities, especially trauma studies. He is primarily interested in the ethical and political implications of depictions of trauma in literature and other media. In addition to his scholarly work, he also teaches sections of ENGL105, tutors for the athletic department, and currently serves as the Fiction Editor for The Carolina Quarterly. He also writes original pieces of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and drama as well as scripts for promotional videos and short narrative or documentary films.


Publications:


Awards

  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2021
  • Departmental Summer Fellowship Service Award to provide administrative support at the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab, 2020
  • Departmental Travel Grant Award Recipient for travel to present at annual MELUS Conference in New Orleans, LA, April 2020
  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2020
  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2019
  • Recipient of multiple grants for “Popular Narratives and the Experience of War,” UNC-Chapel Hill, from The Graduate School; Humanities for the Public Good; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Fine Arts & Humanities; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Social Sciences & Global Programs; Carolina Veterans Resource Center; Department of English and Comparative Literature; Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense; Department of History; and Center for the Study of the American South, 2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

My research focuses on American Protestant missionaries in China during the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries. I also research the history of technology.


Teaching Awards

  • Earl Hartsell Award for Teaching Excellence, UNC English Department, 2022

Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence in Southern Literature, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholar, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020