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Maggie Anne Miller

July 19, 2023

Degrees

2020, BA English, Dalton State College

2023, MA English, Georgia State University

Bio

Born and raised in Georgia, Maggie is a first-year and first-generation Ph.D. student in English literature. Her focus lies in prosody and the poetic imagination of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, particularly in expressions of theological and philosophical ideas and aesthetics in the poetry of Milton, Donne, Spenser, Vaughan, Herbert, and others.

Apart from this focus, Maggie enjoys the work of Dostoevsky, O’Connor, Hardy, and many other thinkers in whose work the human condition unites or collides with Logos. Striving toward a career in teaching, Maggie introduces students to literature that helps them understand themselves in the same way it has helped her.


Publications:

“‘Not a Chaos’: The Intentionality of Music in the Gothic Novel and Film,” SAMLA News 41 (2020): 9-13.


Awards

  • Booker Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, 2023-24.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emma Bradford

July 19, 2023

Degrees

2021, BA English, University of Virginia

Bio

Emma Bradford is a first year PhD student specializing in early modern literature. Her research focuses on negotiations of identity in medieval and early modern drama. She is particularly interested in how non-aristocratic poets represented themselves in court masques and other occasional works written for English aristocrats.


Awards

  • Mellon Fellowship (2023-2029)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Lindsay Ragle-Miller

August 16, 2022

Degrees

2009, BA English with Teacher’s Certification, Eastern Illinois University

2020, MA English, Wayne State University

Bio

Originally from central Illinois, Lindsay is a PhD student and teaching fellow focusing on post-conquest (c. 1100-1300) medieval literature.  Previous research has focused on food in medieval literature, early modern broadside ballads, and perceptions of mental illness in medieval Europe.  Outside of medieval literature, Lindsay is also interested in teaching pedagogy and taught high school English and special education before returning to academia.  She has also worked extensively with a group of instructors at UNC who design coursework focusing on publication in the PIT Journal.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University. https://guides.lib.wayne.edu/folgerkinglear/performance

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Kara Rush

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2022, MA English, Virginia Tech

2019, BA English, Virginia Commonwealth University

Bio

Kara Rush is a first-year Ph.D. student specializing in early modern literature. In particular, Rush is interested in how early modern English authors use  threatening nature and femininity to mediate anxieties concerning the preservation and contamination of English national identity. Other interests include adaptation studies and late medieval literature.


Publications:

  • “Nobility, Interrupted: The Queer Poetics of Vandana Kataria’s Noblemen.Borrowers and Lenders. Forthcoming Fall 2024.

Awards

  • Caroline Pace Chermside Award for Best Master’s Thesis: Virginia Tech, 2022.
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in aid, “An Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas,” taught by Marcy North, Claire M. L. Bourne, and Whitney Trettien, 2023.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andreley Bjelland

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2020, MA English, Texas Christian University

2019, BA English, Texas Christian University

Bio

Andreley Bjelland is a PhD student and teaching fellow. Her research interests include crime, gender, and religion in the early modern period.


Awards

  • Druscilla French Graduate Student Excellence Award, 2021

Lexi Toufas

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2022, BA English, University of Virginia

Bio

Lexi is a second-year PhD student interested in the transmission and reception of early Christian figures, texts, and theologies in the early modern period.


Awards

  • Hanes Graduate Fellowship at the Wilson Library, 2023

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Krista Wiese Telford

August 3, 2022

Degrees

2022, BA English, Meredith College

Bio

Krista Telford is a second-year PhD student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research examines forms of prayer in medieval and early modern literature as well as the impact of form on medieval depictions of the afterlife. She aims to take an interdisciplinary approach in her research, considering the performative aspect of many poems and prayers and drawing on musicological research. Krista’s recent and ongoing work includes a project exploring resistance to transcendence in the ending of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, which examines Chaucer’s reading of Boethius, and a paper exploring the polyphonic and dialogic nature of Francesco Suriano’s underexamined 15th century treatise on the Holy Land, Il trattato di Terra Santa e dell’Oriente.


Awards

  • Fall 2022-Present Graduate Teaching Fellow, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2024 Breen Award for Outstanding Work in Medieval Studies, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature
  • 2024 Donald R. Howard Travel Scholarship, The New Chaucer Society
  • 2024 LSP Teaching Fellowship, UNC Chapel Hill Latina/o Studies Program
  • 2023 Travel Grant, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature
  • 2023 Ruth Rose Richardson Award for outstanding performance in the first year of graduate
    study, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Everett Lang

September 20, 2021

Degrees

2010, B.A. (Hons) Literae Humaniores, University of Oxford

2018, M.A. Ancient Greek and Latin, Boston College

Bio

Everett Lang studies Ancient Greek and Latin literature, primarily from the Roman Imperial period, and its later reception in Early Modern Britain and northern Europe.


Isabel Grace Thomas Howard

August 5, 2021

Degrees

2020, BA English, Trinity College Dublin

Bio

Isabel (they/them) is a second-year PhD student at the University of North Carolina. Their research examines representations of embodiment and the soul in Middle English, Anglo-Norman, and Latin religious texts, considering how structures between the corporeal, physical self and the sensing, feeling, and immaterial self can be read alongside theories of queer embodiment, affect, and representations.

In this framework, Isabel is concerned with how language informs depictions of physical and metaphysical identity and how these identities are often unsettled and displaced through language. In their reading of queerness in medieval texts, Isabel desires to experiment with how we recognize and interpret ‘queerness’ not as a fixed phenomenon, but an amalgamation of acts, events, and performances in dialogue with identity-formation.

They are currently working on two projects: one entitled ‘I kan nat glose’: Queering Illegible Signification in Chaucer’s The Merchant’s Tale,’ which analyzes the infamous pear tree sex scene in Chaucer’s The Merchant’s Tale as a culmination of unintelligible semiotic exchanges of letters and of sexual organs, and the other, “Needle as Queer Instrument of Authorship in Chrétien de Troyes Yvain,” which considers the implications of the textile worker as auctor.


Awards

  • Joseph Breen Award, UNC Chapel Hill Department of English & Comparative Literature, 2023
  • Research Grant, UNC Chapel Hill Medieval and Early Modern Studies, 2023
  • Travel Award, UNC Chapel Hill Graduate and Professional Student Government, 2023
  • Travel Grant, UNC Chapel Hill Department of English & Comparative Literature, 2022
  • CARA Summer Scholarship, Medieval Academy of America, 2022
  • First Class Honours in English Studies, Trinity College Dublin, 2020

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Antonia DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

Bio

Toni DiNardo is a fourth year PhD student in the department of English and Comparative literature. Once described by a colleague as a “medievalismist,” her work is predominantly concerned with the mediation of medieval thought and constructions of the middle ages in modern genre fantasy. She is particularly interested in the use of what Umberto Eco called “the Middle Ages as pretext” as a backdrop for the construction and sustenance of socio-political identities, from bucolic queer medievalisms to white nationalist idealization of a putatively ethno-nationalist Middle Ages. Toni has given talks on the fraught intersection of fantasy and conceptions of “historical accuracy” and on the co-opting of popular fantasy franchises as recruiting tools by far-right groups, and in 2023 she held the Hanes Graduate Fellowship, studying the annotations and marginalia of C. S. Lewis’ personal collection of medieval and early modern texts.


Awards

  • Hanes Graduate Fellowship, Rare Book Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library, 2023

Curriculum Vitae / Resume