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Amy Chan

August 5, 2021

Degrees

2018, BA Classics, University of Pennsylvania

Bio

I am primarily interested in how writers represent the “Self” in 19th and 20th century literature, from Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson to early autofiction authors to the Confessionals.


Awards

  • Booker Fellowship, 2021
  • Inclusive Excellence Top-Up, 2021

Joshua Ripple

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2019, BAH English, Stanford University

2021, MA Philosophy, The New School for Social Research

Bio

I am primarily interested in 20th century Southern literature, but also have interests in philosophy, film, anthropology, science fiction, religion, comparative literature, and approximately everything else.


Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena is a PhD student, graduate research assistant with the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab, and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Additionally, Meleena is earning a certificate in Women and Gender Studies. Their research focuses on contemporary LatinX literature, queer theory, and the environmental humanities with special attention to rhetorics of advocacy. Meleena is a rare plant hobbyist, stray animal collector, and celebrator of quirks and kinks. Their aim is to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Nathan Andrew Quinn

January 21, 2021

Degrees

2016, BA English, Princeton University

Bio

Nathan possesses a strong interest in late 20th and 21st century American literature, with a particular focus on contemporary works with magical realist and “hysterical realist” elements. This interest has led him in the direction of postsecular theory and the philosophy of language.


Jonathan Albrite

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2008, BA English, James Madison University

2020, MA English, James Madison University

Bio

Broadly interested in posthumanism, ecocriticism, and affect theory, John’s research explores how nonhuman agents have shaped the literature and film of America’s long twentieth century. At the same time, he studies the productive tension between posthumanism’s push to consider nonhuman lives and the ongoing work of critical race, gender, and disability scholars, who advocate for the human lives ignored by systems of power.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rose Steptoe

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, BA English and History, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

Rose Steptoe is a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the graduate communications editor for the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab housed within UNC’s ECL Department. Her focus is in film studies, and she is interested in exploring questions of gender and sexuality, affect, authorship, and genre in audiovisual media. Her recent research has focused on women directors within the horror genre.


Mindy Buchanan-King

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, MA English, College of Charleston

2001, BA Mass Communications, Emory & Henry College

Bio

Mindy Buchanan-King is a first-year Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research is focused on American literature of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century, particularly the work of female Americanists. Using archival research, she seeks to analyze how such authors as Edith Wharton, Sarah Jewett, Pauline Hopkins, and Willa Cather approached female health and her body—including sexuality, pregnancy, and menstruation—and how their conceptions may have been informed by transatlantic medical narratives. Ms. King is also keen to integrate health humanities perspectives into her work, including an understanding of how the female body is diagnosed and how literary female narratives may foster (or complicate) an empathetic understanding of the female body when administering and receiving health care.


Publications:

  • Buchanan-King, Mindy. “Joan Crawford: Problematizing the (Aging) Female Image and Sexuality in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2019): 1-23.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Megan Swartzfager

August 7, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, University of Mississippi

Bio

Megan Swartzfager is enrolled in the MA program in Literature, Medicine and Culture and serves as a HHIVE Lab RA. She is interested in gendered rhetoric in medicine, the politicization of medical knowledge, and social determinants of health.


Karah Mitchell

July 13, 2020

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I am a PhD candidate studying American literature of the long nineteenth century with a focus on critical animal studies, histories of natural science, and poetics. In my dissertation project, “The Call of Kind”: Humanizing the Animal in American Literature, 1830-1918, I am exploring the connections between literary genres and the emergence of the modern pet industry from Sarah Josepha Hale’s 1830 poem “Mary’s Lamb” to the establishment of the Jack London Club by the Massachusetts SPCA in 1918. I consider how poetry, pet autobiographies, and fiction were all primary means through which writers humanized animals during this period, thereby influencing material changes that were made to improve animal welfare; I postulate that works now deemed “literary” accounted in large part for the rise in pet-keeping as an industry and in modern veterinary practices. With my focus on humanization and animal welfare, I wish to build upon and complicate recent posthumanist-driven arguments in the field of American literary studies as I investigate the poetics of domestic animal care.

In my future work, I am interested in exploring how we might connect the field of critical animal studies with modern veterinary science; I thus wish to connect theory with practice with respect to animal care. I would ultimately like to develop ways for placing literary studies and veterinary science into more direct conversation with one another in a manner that is similar to, yet different from, the medical humanities.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer Vol. 27, 2019 (roundtable article from MLA 2019)

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume