Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA, Dartmouth College, English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jacob T. Watson

October 15, 2018

Degrees

PhD, English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Defending 2018

M.A. English, University of Georgia at Athens, 2011

B.A. English, Philosophy Minor, University of Georgia at Athens, 2009

magna cum laude

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate specializing in critical theory, film and media. I’m currently thinking about the discourses surrounding audiovisual technology in the mid-twentieth century as they pertain to the history and prehistory of American broadcast television. My other interests include graphics, speculative fiction after World War II, image theory, information theory, and screen archeology. I have taught courses on contemporary literature, digital literature, film and visual culture. I’m also an avid hiker and obsessive music lover.


Publications:

“The Suffusion of the Televisual in The Crying of Lot 49.” Style 51.2 (2017).


Teaching Awards

  • 2017-18           UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Distinguished Teaching Fellowship
  • 2015                UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Senior Teaching Fellowship

Awards

  • 2016-17           UNC Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship
  • 2016                The Eliason Dissertation Fellowship
  • 2015                The Carol and Edward Smithwick Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2015                The John R. Bittner Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Literature and Media

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nicole Berland

October 15, 2018

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

While I mostly situate my research within the fields of post-45 American speculative fiction, comics, and television, my interest in seriality’s forms and functions occasionally direct my attention towards mathematics, music, and Victorian literature, among other areas. As a Teaching Fellow at UNC, I have taught several rhetoric and composition courses, including Writing Across the Disciplines and Writing in the Social Sciences, and in the Fall of 2016 I designed and taught a section of a course entitled Literature and Cultural Diversity. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice and science fiction also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018


Awards

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005


Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

Liz Shand is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, gender studies, and Victorian criticism. She is particularly interested in the dominant depictions of women’s reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through analyses of print culture, material studies, and the history of technology, she is interested in the way that women accessed and shared texts within and outside of dominant reading networks.

Aside from her research, Liz integrates design and digital writing in her research and pedagogy. She has developed design resources and guides for UNC’s Design Lab and for Wilson Special Collections Library and has worked in the Digital Innovation Lab.


Publications:

  • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

September 11, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Humanities & Writing, Houghton College, 2014

Bio

Ben Murphy is a PhD candidate in nineteenth-century American literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research draws on the history and philosophy of science (especially ecology, biology, medicine, and the social sciences), the environmental humanities, and American literature from antebellum to World War I (approx. 1830s – 1914). Writing on these topics and book reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Mississippi Quarterly, Boundary2, symploke, and The Carolina Quarterly. His dissertation centers on vitalism, biopolitics, and discourses of crowd behavior and theory in literature of the long nineteenth century.

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, Ben teaches courses in composition and rhetoric. He has also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West. Additionally, Ben is a member of the department’s Peer Mentoring Committee, a Research Assistant in UNC’s Music Library, and the Book Review Editor at the The Carolina Quarterly.


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

While my interests are varied–from British Modernism to North African Cinema to RPG tabletop and videogames–my current research focuses on gender and sexuality in French and North African Film. While I usually teach French language classes, I also have a background in Women’s and Gender Studies, Global Cinema, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian Studies, and African Studies.


Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2018

Laurel Foote-Hudson

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2007, B.A., Honors and Distinction,
Department of Romance Languages and Literature (Spanish)
and Department of Asian Studies (Japanese), University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

 

Bio

Laurel Foote-Hudson is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  Her current research interests are influenced by her exposure to both Spanish and Japanese languages and literatures, as well as popular culture.  Her projects utilize a comparative research approach to better reflect an ongoing interest in the genres of Golden Age Spanish and Edo Period Japanese theater, travelogue and popular culture.  Recent presentations include the exploration of the performance of the self and foreign “other” in contemporary popular media, including anime, videogames and comics.  Framing both genres within their respective literary and cultural contexts is her work in modern Adaptation Theory and Digital Humanities and she looks forward to expanding upon these frameworks within her dissertation.


Contact

email |
Office: Dey 339