Brendan Chambers

September 11, 2019
Photo of Brendan Chambers

Degrees

2019, BA English, Boston College

Bio

Brendan is a PhD student studying 20th century American literature.  His interests lie at the nexus of literature and phenomenology, exploring how writers across genres represent consciousness and perception in their writing.


Publications:

  • “Phenomenological Reproduction in Thompson and Mailer’s New Journalism.” Dianoia. (Spring 2019)

Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Boston College, 2019

Emily Long

September 9, 2019
Photo of Emily Long

Degrees

2019, B.S. Biology, Second Major in English with Highest Honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Emily is a Master’s student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She combines her dual interests in medicine and literature through her work in the medical humanities. Emily’s current research focuses on pre-trauma theory in nineteenth-century American literature.


Emily Youree

August 12, 2019
Photo of Emily Youree, taken by Katherine Stein

Degrees

2019, BA English, Samford University

Bio

Emily Youree is a PhD student studying medieval British literature. She is especially interested in reception and adaptations of Roman texts and traditions in medieval works.


Katherine Stein

August 5, 2019
Photo of Katherine Stein, taken by Emily Youree

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature and History, Marquette University

Bio

Katherine Stein is a first-year PhD student absorbed in pursuing the lines between historical fact and fictional narrative.  Her interests include Victorian literature, Irish literature, children’s literature, reception studies, and contemporary historical fiction.


Geovani Ramírez

May 23, 2019

Degrees

BA English, University of North Carolina at Wilmington (summa cum laude)

MA British and American Literature, North Carolina State University

Bio

Geovani Ramírez is a Ph.D candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he specializes in Multiethnic and Latinx literature. His dissertation explores the ways Mexican-heritage women writers use the topic of labor in their works to interrogate and re-shape notions of class, race, gender, culture, (trans)national identities, and citizenship.

While at UNC, Geovani has enjoyed working with UNC students in various capacities, including as a graduate research consultant for Latinx and Women’s and Gender Studies literature courses, sole instructor for ENGL 105 Composition and Rhetoric, ENGL 105i Writing in the Social Sciences, and courses in Women’s and Gender Studies and literature. From fall 2014 to spring 2018, Geovani worked as a writing coach at the UNC Writing Center, where he coached undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines on a wide range of writing genres and projects. He has also been an assistant writing coordinator for the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program since the summer of 2018.

Geovani was a graduate student fellow at the UNC Center for Faculty Excellence during the 2018-2019 academic year, and he joined the UNC Latina/o Studies Program as a graduate assistant in the spring of 2019.


Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Center for the Study of the American South Travel Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Lea/McLaurin Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018
  • George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

I am a PhD student studying social reform in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially in regards to gender and sexuality. I am interested in how literature of the period engages with the free love movement and utopianism. The Oneida Community and Brook Farm are two experimental utopian communities of great interest to me. Additional areas of interest include: women’s writing, sentimental fiction, gothic literature, cultural studies, and African American literature.


Publications:

Teutsch, Matthew and Katharine Henry. “‘Memories wasn’t a place, memories was in the mind’: the Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.Mississippi Quarterly vol. 68, no. 3-4 (2015): 511-530.


Awards

  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, Spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • The Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholarship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

MA, Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies, The University of Alabama

BA, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature, medicine, and culture. She completed her master’s thesis, “‘They are gone to read upon me’: The Donnean Body-Text”, with the Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies in 2013. After graduating, she worked as an editor and writer for the Institute for Rural Health Research. Her recent work has focused on physician-patient exchanges and early modern treatment of the corpse.


Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica is a PhD student in Comparative Literature and teaching assistant in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. She focuses on 19th and 20th century Russian and Eastern European literature. Her MA thesis (2013)  explored the role of death in Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Her current research interests include animal studies, atrocity, utopias/dystopias, revolutions, and the concept of death.

 

 


Awards

  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)