Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Erin Piemont

October 30, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

Erin Piemont studies postwar American poetry with special attention to poets of the New York School. Her research interests include lyric theory, the poetics of space, and relationships between postmodern poetry and contemporary critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA, Dartmouth College, English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emma Duvall

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Emma is a Comparative Literature student interested in ancient Greek philosophy.  Her work explores the relationship between philosophy and poetry in Plato and Aristotle.  She is also interested in language, specifically metaphor and simile.


Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Articles

  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading,” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (forthcoming)
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 47: Issue 3, 317-332, 2018.
  • “Reformatted / Re-fleshed: Gender, the Internet and New Configurations for Embodiment.” Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism: Vol. 7: No. 1, 2014.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Ruth Richardson Award for Outstanding Academic Performance in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2018

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Taras Vladimirovich Mikhailiuk

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2011, B. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

2013, M. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

Bio

My research focuses on the unsayable in British Romantic poetry, particularly in the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. I am interested in examining how philosophical, social, and political concerns underscore uses of the unsayable at the level of grammar and poetic diction. I also serve as an Assistant Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal.


Publications:

  • David Biespiel, The Education of a Young Poet (Berkeley: Counterpoint Press, 2017), reviewed for Carolina Quarterly. May 10, 2018
  • Audrey Wasser, The Work of Difference: Modernism, Romanticism, and the Production of Literary Form (New York: Fordham University Press, 2016), reviewed for Comparative Literature Studies, (forthcoming)
  • A Short Story: Interspersed with Poetry; What You Please, Or, Memoirs of Modern Characters; The Forest of St. Bernardo; The Monk’s Daughter; Or, Hypocrisy Punished; The Maiden Wife; Or, Heiress of De Coursey, entries for The Cambridge Guide to Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660–1820,(forthcoming in 2020)

Teaching Awards

  • College of Education Outstanding Student Teacher, Middle Tennessee State University, 2011

Awards

  • The William R. Wolfe Graduate Writing Award (Honorable Mention), Middle Tennessee State University, 2012
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Graduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2011
  • ETS Recognition of Excellence (PRAXIS), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Martha Hixon Creative Expression Award (First Place, Poetry), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Undergraduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2009

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

Nikki Roulo’s research focuses primarily upon early modern literature. In particular, she is interested in the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, who bridges both genres, and ballads and music within early modern texts.


Publications:

  • “Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. 206 pp. $104.95 ISBN: 9781472458322.” In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018).
  • “Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. 385 pp. $40.00 ISBN: 9780226415970.” In Journal of Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018).

Awards

  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology

Anna Carson Levett

April 24, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA French and English (with emphasis in Creative Writing), University of Pennsylvania

Bio

Anna Levett is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature. Specializing in twentieth century French/Francophone and Arabic literature, her work primarily focuses on Mediterranean studies and global modernism, with a secondary focus on film studies. Her dissertation, Mediterranean Dream-Places: The Past and Future of Surrealism in Late 20th century Arab Literature, concerns the reception of French surrealism in the Arab world. From 2015-2016, she was a fellow at the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (CASA) in Cairo, Egypt. In Fall 2018 she will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She has published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.


Publications:

  • “‘Shouldn’t Love Be the One True Thing?’ Godard and the Legacy of Surrealist Ethics,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 34.8 (Summer 2017).


Awards

  • Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France (Fall 2018)
  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC Graduate School (2016-2017)
  • Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) Fellowship, American University in Cairo (2015-2016)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (2012-2013)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, Qasid Institute, Amman, Jordan (Summer 2012)
  • FLAS – Beginning Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (Summer 2011)
  • Best Graduate Essay in Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2010-2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume