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Audrey J. Gibson

September 16, 2021

Degrees

2021, BA English, Centenary College of Louisiana

2021, BA French, Centenary College of Louisiana

Bio

Audrey Gibson is a first-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. She is broadly interested in 20th century American literature, with particular emphasis on Southern and multiethnic writing. Her previous research has focused on French-language poetry, particularly Afro-Creole literature, situated in New Orleans during the Civil War and Reconstruction. This research explored the construction of identity and community through language, publication, education, religion, and political involvement.


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Karah Mitchell

July 13, 2020

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I am a PhD candidate studying American literature of the long nineteenth century with a focus on critical animal studies, histories of natural science, and poetics. In my dissertation project, “The Call of Kind”: Humanizing the Animal in American Literature, 1830-1918, I am exploring the connections between literary genres and the emergence of the modern pet industry from Sarah Josepha Hale’s 1830 poem “Mary’s Lamb” to the establishment of the Jack London Club by the Massachusetts SPCA in 1918. I consider how poetry, pet autobiographies, and fiction were all primary means through which writers humanized animals during this period, thereby influencing material changes that were made to improve animal welfare; I postulate that works now deemed “literary” accounted in large part for the rise in pet-keeping as an industry and in modern veterinary practices. With my focus on humanization and animal welfare, I wish to build upon and complicate recent posthumanist-driven arguments in the field of American literary studies as I investigate the poetics of domestic animal care.

In my future work, I am interested in exploring how we might connect the field of critical animal studies with modern veterinary science; I thus wish to connect theory with practice with respect to animal care. I would ultimately like to develop ways for placing literary studies and veterinary science into more direct conversation with one another in a manner that is similar to, yet different from, the medical humanities.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer Vol. 27, 2019 (roundtable article from MLA 2019)

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Bailey Fernandez

June 26, 2020
Photo of Bailey Fernandez, taken by Emily Youree

Degrees

2019: B.A. English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a literary critic and scholar primarily working within the British Romantic period, though he is interested in contemporary literature as well. His thematic interests consist primarily in aesthetics, the philosophy of language, and the formal interchanges between literature, art, and music.

In addition to his scholarship, he also engages in editorial work.  He is a project assistant at The William Blake Archive and an associate editor at the Carolina Quarterly. In his spare time, he writes music and poetry.


Publications:

Sun Cycle: A Review” Carolina Quarterly no. 69, vol. 4 (Summer 2020)


Awards

Digital Innovation Lab, 2019-20


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Colin Dekeersgieter

September 25, 2019

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, University of Vermont

2014, M.A. Modern Literature, CUNY, Graduate Center

2017, M.F.A. Creative Writing, Poetry, New York University

 

Bio

Colin Dekeersgieter is a poet and Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature invested in modern poetry, poetics, and (neuro)aesthetics. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the North American Review, Green Mountains Review, The Worcester Review, and elsewhere.


Awards

  • Goldwater Fellowship, New York University, 2017

Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Federis Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Federis Remetir is a doctoral candidate at UNC Chapel Hill who writes about transpacific migration, representations of water extractions, interspecies entanglements, coloniality, anglophone Filipinx and world literatures, and gender. In her research and teaching methods, she is committed to pushing the boundaries of literary, cultural, and media studies to examine questions of race, gender, and settler logics, while thinking about futures of care, transnational solidarity, and abolition with students.

Trisha’s dissertation, Unfamiliar Waters: Representations of Resource Extraction in the Philippines, 1970s to present, argues that extractive projects in waters in and around the Philippines have altered the composition of water, both on material and representational scales. By examining  examples of water in transnational Filipinx contemporary poetry, 1970s Filipino social realist film, historical archives, and other media, this project pushes against the assumption that the Philippines’ relationship to the Global North is solely defined by extraction of inanimate resources on land (such as oils and minerals)—in fact, this project argues that 20- and 21st century extractive water projects are focusing more on the management of renewable resources and regulating the movement of animate beings (such as human bodies and fish), to the detriment of all. The three chapters, entitled SaltwaterFreshwater, and Storms, each take on three  “types” of water as they were redefined by various moments of resource extraction, such as transnational migration patterns set into place during the Marcos authoritarian regime, movements to nationalize freshwater spaces for aquaculture, and tenuous responses to ever-increasing typhoons. This project makes significant contributions to the  Critical Filipino Studies, Feminist Science and Technology Studies (STS), and media and cultural studies by conversing with scientific archives and artists as they make sense of their changing relationships to water and aquatic life. And lastly, the project contends that Filipino/a/x water aesthetics also challenges extraction’s singular vision of water by uncovering manifold ways of living in relation to water.  In so doing, artists and cultural producers in this study alter water’s cultural and material makeup as well.

Trisha’s forthcoming work can be seen in the edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular culture, and in public digital humanities projects as a 2020 Imagining America PAGE fellow. She has taught courses in digital humanities, world literature, ocean literature, and film.


Publications:

2021                (Forthcoming) “Aquaculture Visions, Techno-Settler Hierarchies, and The Mysterious Milkfish (1982),” edited collection Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, ed. Paul Michael Atienza and Dr. Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez.

 

2020                (Forthcoming) “National Properties, National Ecologies: Postcolonial and ecocritical engagements with Mikhail Red’s Birdshot (2016),” edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular Culture, ed. Dr. Jason Telles and Dr. Charles Ryan.


Teaching Awards

2020

  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

Awards

2021

  • Digital Dissertation Fellowship

2020

  • Chancellor’s Doctoral Candidacy Award
  • Humanities for the Public Good Grant
  • UC Speculative Futures Collective grant
  • Southeast Asian Language Council Tuition Support Award
  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

2019

  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award
  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellow
  • Institute of the Arts and Humanities Travel Award
  • Representing Migrations Humanities Lab Fellowship (Duke)

2018

  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship

Curriculum Vitae / Resume