Emma Duvall

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Emma is a Comparative Literature student interested in ancient Greek philosophy.  Her work explores the relationship between philosophy and poetry in Plato and Aristotle.  She is also interested in language, specifically metaphor and simile.


Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Taras Vladimirovich Mikhailiuk

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2011, B. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

2013, M. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

Bio

My research focuses on the unsayable in British Romantic poetry, particularly in the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. I am interested in examining how philosophical, social, and political concerns underscore uses of the unsayable at the level of grammar and poetic diction. I also serve as an Assistant Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal.


Publications:

  • David Biespiel, The Education of a Young Poet (Berkeley: Counterpoint Press, 2017), reviewed for Carolina Quarterly. May 10, 2018
  • Audrey Wasser, The Work of Difference: Modernism, Romanticism, and the Production of Literary Form (New York: Fordham University Press, 2016), reviewed for Comparative Literature Studies, (forthcoming)
  • A Short Story: Interspersed with Poetry; What You Please, Or, Memoirs of Modern Characters; The Forest of St. Bernardo; The Monk’s Daughter; Or, Hypocrisy Punished; The Maiden Wife; Or, Heiress of De Coursey, entries for The Cambridge Guide to Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660–1820,(forthcoming in 2020)

Teaching Awards

  • College of Education Outstanding Student Teacher, Middle Tennessee State University, 2011

Awards

  • The William R. Wolfe Graduate Writing Award (Honorable Mention), Middle Tennessee State University, 2012
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Graduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2011
  • ETS Recognition of Excellence (PRAXIS), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Martha Hixon Creative Expression Award (First Place, Poetry), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Undergraduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2009

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Matthew Bradford Diem

April 23, 2018

Degrees

BA English and Classics with high distinction, University of Virginia, 2015

Bio

Originally from Allentown, PA, Matthew Diem completed a BA in English and Classics at the University of Virginia in 2015, and has been a PhD student in English at UNC since August of that year. His research interests include translations and adaptations of the Bible in Old and Middle English, and Latin and vernacular satire in the Middle Ages.


Awards

  • Joseph Breen Award for Outstanding Work in the Field of Medieval Studies, 2017

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Migrations Lab at Duke University Department of English. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of  the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Data Plus Project Fellow, Information Initiative, Duke University. $2500, 2018.
  • UNC/King’s College Fund, The Institute for Arts and the Humanities, UNC-CH, $1980. 2018.
  • Migrations Fellow, Dept. of English, Duke University. $750, 2017
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2017.

Tiffany Friedman

April 15, 2018

Degrees

2014, MA in Linguistics, University of Georgia

2011, BA in English and French, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Bio

My areas of interest include rhetoric of health and medicine, rhetoric of science and religion, food rhetorics, and writing in the disciplines. More specifically, my research focuses on alternative approaches to healthcare. My current project, titled “Science Falsely So Called: The Rhetorical Ecology of Christian Science and Biomedicine in the Late Nineteenth Century,” contextualizes the development of mainstream biomedical authority by tracing the rhetorical history of Christian Science.

As part of Carolina’s Digital Literacy Initiative, my courses incorporate multimodal research and composition.  In past semesters, my students have worked with Adobe InDesign to create popular science magazine articles and conference posters. I find that composing in this new medium invigorates students and allows them to discover skills and interests that they never knew they had.


Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2016-2017

Awards

  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume