Nicole Berland

October 15, 2018

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

While I mostly situate my research within the fields of post-45 American speculative fiction, comics, and television, my interest in seriality’s forms and functions occasionally direct my attention towards mathematics, music, and Victorian literature, among other areas. As a Teaching Fellow at UNC, I have taught several rhetoric and composition courses, including Writing Across the Disciplines and Writing in the Social Sciences, and in the Fall of 2016 I designed and taught a section of a course entitled Literature and Cultural Diversity. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice and science fiction also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018


Awards

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005


Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

Liz Shand is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, gender studies, and Victorian criticism. She is particularly interested in the dominant depictions of women’s reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through analyses of print culture, material studies, and the history of technology, she is interested in the way that women accessed and shared texts within and outside of dominant reading networks.

Aside from her research, Liz integrates design and digital writing in her research and pedagogy. She has developed design resources and guides for UNC’s Design Lab and for Wilson Special Collections Library and has worked in the Digital Innovation Lab.


Publications:

  • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

  • Guest editor, with Doreen Thierauf, of a special issue of Women’s Writing on “Generations” (forthcoming 2018)

Awards

  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

Bridget C. Donnelly

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, Lawrence University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and I specialize in British literature of the long eighteenth century and the history of the novel. My dissertation project considers shifting discourses surrounding accidental events throughout the eighteenth century, framing the analysis around fictional representations of carriage accidents in texts like Tobias Smollett’s Humphry Clinker, Frances Burney’s Evelina, Mary Hays’s Memoirs of Emma Courtney, and Jane Austen’s Love and Friendship. 


Publications:

  • “‘Chequer-Work[s] of Providence’: Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe’s Fiction.” Philosophy and Literature. Forthcoming.
  • Five entries in The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820. Ed. April London. Cambridge University Press. Forthcoming 2018.

Awards

  • W.M. Keck Foundation Fellowship for research at the Huntington Library, awarded March 2018
  • Huntington Library Travel Grant to the United Kingdom, awarded March 2018
  • Aubrey Williams Research Travel Grant, American Society for 18th-Century Studies, awarded March 2018
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Travel Award for archival research in England, awarded October 2017
  • Best Graduate Student Paper, International Society for the Study of Narrative, awarded June 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Edward Hyunsoo Yang

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Literature and Political Science, Loyola Marymount University

2015, MA English, Claremont Graduate University

Bio

My research interests include the history of the novel, narrative performance, and authenticity. Drawing from British novels of the Long Eighteenth Century and Twentieth Century American novels, I hope to produce a project that examines narrative interruptions: moments in a text when a voice, distinct from that of any other character, enters the narrative.

Some of my past research examines: the performance of authenticity in The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey, competing narrative frames in Frankenstein, a blending of genres in The Castle of Otranto, resistance to introspection in Mumblecore films, and the role of authenticity in Hip Hop.


Awards

  • Fulbright, English Teaching Assistantship (Germany), 2016-17

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on multiethnic literature and critical race theory. His current research focuses on the role of social criticism in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, drama, and performance theory.


Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Migrations Lab at Duke University Department of English. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of  the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Data Plus Project Fellow, Information Initiative, Duke University. $2500, 2018.
  • UNC/King’s College Fund, The Institute for Arts and the Humanities, UNC-CH, $1980. 2018.
  • Migrations Fellow, Dept. of English, Duke University. $750, 2017
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2017.