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Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten is a PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which she finds exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, she enjoys nurturing all forms of human and other life through her passion for plants, pets, and parenting.


Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)

Anna Broadwell-Gulde

July 28, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English, Hendrix College

2016, MA Social Sciences, University of Chicago

Bio

My work centers on questions of subjectivity, agency, and desire in twentieth-century American literature and global cinema. Most recently, I have become interested in the relationship between debt and desire as dual economic and psychological forces that structure contemporary experience. Living and teaching abroad (most recently, Brazil) has shaped my approach to literature and film and has enabled me to explore transatlantic cultural and aesthetic influences on literary and cinematic forms.


Publications:

  • “Pilar’s Turn Inward: Storytelling in Hemingway’s For Whom the Bell Tolls,” Teaching Hemingway and War, Kent State University Press, 2015.

Awards

  • Fulbright English Teaching Fellowship, Brazil, 2014
  • FLAS Fellowship, Brazil, 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rebecca Rae Garonzik

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2009, MA Comparative Literature, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2005, BA Spanish, Goucher College

Bio

Rebecca Garonzik is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. Her areas of specialization are twentieth and twenty-first century Latin American and Latinx literatures. She is currently completing her dissertation, “Eros Galvanized: Critical Intersections of Eroticism and Politics in Contemporary Latin American and Latina/o/x Literatures (1965-2011),” under the direction of Juan Carlos González Espitia. In addition to her research on socially committed literature, Rebecca has also published work on poetics and Foucauldian discourse analysis. She is the founding co-president of the Literatures of the Americas working group.


Publications:

  • “Beyond Marcuse: Guevara’s Influence on the Revolutionary Erotic in Julio Cortázar’s Libro de Manuel.” A Contracorriente 13.2 (Winter 2016): 1-24. Web. 8 March 2016.
  • “Deconstructing Psychiatric Discourse and Idealized Madness in Cristina Rivera Garza’s Nadie me verá llorar.” Chasqui: Revista de Literatura Latinoamericana 43.1 (May 2014): 3-14.
  • “‘To name that thing without a name’: Linking Poetry and the Child’s Voice in Sandra   Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street.” Letras Femeninas 37.2 (Winter 2011): 139-55.
  • “Queering Feminism: Cristina Rivera Garza’s La cresta de Ilión and the Feminine Sublime.” Cuaderno Internacional de Estudios Humanísticos y Literatura 14 (Fall 2010): 45-56.
  • “Permanencias de Juan Rulfo en la crítica contemporánea.” Rev. of Ecos y murmullos en la obra de Rulfo, Ed. Julio Moguel and Enrique Sáinz. Confluencia 24.2 (Spring 2009): 151-53.

Awards

  • Frankel Dissertation Fellowship
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Helen Carroll Shelley Prize in Romance Languages

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

  • 2017, BA Critical Studies in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2017, BA Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century hemispheric experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX exploration of the sonics and optics of our contemporary American Landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • Latina/o Studies Teaching Grant – 2020

Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Marcy Pedzwater

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA Literature, BA Spanish, University of North Carolina Asheville

Bio

Marcy Pedzwater studies twentieth and twenty-first century North and Latin American literature. Her current research focuses on the intersections of race, gender, and colonialism/imperialism in Post-dictatorship literature of the Americas. She is also interested in the function of memory, archive, and trauma in these texts. She teaches English 105, Spanish 105, and Spanish 203.


Publications:

  • Review of Forms of Dictatorship: Power, Narrative, and Authoritarianism in the Latina/o Novel, by Jennifer Harford Vargas, Chiricú, Fall 2019.
  • “Thinking with José Revueltas and Roberto Bolaño: Philosophical Literary Approaches to Latin America.” Review of José Revueltas y Roberto Bolaño: Formas genéricas de la experiencia by Alejandro Sánchez Lopera, A Contracorriente, vol. 15, no. 3, Spring 2018.
  •  “Not of this World: Divine Radical Inclusivity as a Foil to Worldly Wisdom in Flannery O’Connor’s The Violent Bear It Away,The Sigma Tau Delta Review, vol. 14, Sigma Tau Delta, Spring 2017.