Matthew Scott Duncan

August 8, 2018

Degrees

BA English, Clemson University

Bio

Matt Duncan is a second-year PhD student and teaching fellow at the UNC Chapel Hill. His research explores the unique role of digital tools in shaping the composition classroom, with an emphasis on a low-bridge approach to the application of technology in writing curriculum. He is also Co-Editor of Fiction for Carolina Quarterly and is a Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative Project Management Fellow.


Awards

  • CDHI Project Management Fellowship
  • CDHI Recruitment Fellowship
  • Fred W. Shilstone Memorial Award
  • Lucy K. Rollins Award

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Anneke Schwob

August 7, 2018

Degrees

2010, S.B. Literature (21L), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010, S.B. Science and Humanities (21S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate whose research interests include American literature and science, the birth of American conservation movements, periodical studies, and natural history. Archival portions of my research have been supported by fellowships from the Science Fiction Society, the Graduate School at UNC, and the Mary and David Harrison Institute at the University of Virginia. My dissertation, In Situ: Environmental Management and the American Literary Imagination, explores how popular, serialized narratives used the scientific project of wilderness exploration and conservation as a tool of literary nationalism in the decades immediately preceding the foundation of the National Parks Service. My research is informed by my background in the biological sciences and a deep personal interest in backpacking and mountaineering.


Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Dissertation Travel Fellowship, 2017
  • National Humanities Center “Humanities in Class” Internship, 2017
  • UVA Lillian Gary Taylor Visiting Fellowship in American Literature, 2017
  • SFS Mullen Research Fellowship, 2016
  • Robert A. Bain Award for Excellence in 19thCentury American Literature, 2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Sarah Ann Singer

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., magna cum laude, Women’s Studies and English Language and Literature. University of Maryland, May 2013. Phi Beta Kappa.

Bio

Sarah Singer is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies. Drawing on her experiences as a patient and peer health educator, Sarah’s research focuses on chronic illness in the medical and public spheres. Sarah’s dissertation, “Rhetorics of Patient Empowerment: Leveraging Lyme Disease and the Future of Chronic Illness,” examines how different stakeholders adopt the language of patient empowerment to make claims about the diagnosis, treatment, and recovery from Lyme Disease. For more information about her background and teaching philosophy, please see her personal website.


Publications:

  • Edwell, Jennifer, Singer, Sarah, and Jordynn Jack. “Healing Arts: Rhetorical Techne
    as Medical (Humanities) Intervention.” Technical Communication Quarterly, special
    issue on “Rhetoric of Health and Medicine,” 2018, pp. 1-14.
  • Singer, Sarah, Weed, Kym, Edwell, Jennifer, Jack, Jordynn, and Jane Thrailkill.
    “Advancing Pre-Health Humanities as Intensive Research Practice: Principles and
    Recommendations from a Cross-Disciplinary Baccalaureate Setting.” Journal of
    Medical Humanities, special issue on “Pre-Health Humanities Education,” vol. 38, no.
    4, 2017, pp. 373-384.
  • Singer, Sarah. “Beyond the Domestic Sphere: Home Economics and the Education
    of Women at Maryland State College, 1916–94.” Young Scholars in Writing:
    Undergraduate Research in Writing and Rhetoric, vol. 10, 2012, pp. 105-15.

Teaching Awards

  • Earl Hartsell Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition (2017)
  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition (2016)

Awards

  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship (2018)
  • Frankel Dissertation Fellowship (2017)
  • Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship (2017)
  • Eliason Summer Research Stipend (2014)

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Migrations Lab at Duke University Department of English. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of  the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Data Plus Project Fellow, Information Initiative, Duke University. $2500, 2018.
  • UNC/King’s College Fund, The Institute for Arts and the Humanities, UNC-CH, $1980. 2018.
  • Migrations Fellow, Dept. of English, Duke University. $750, 2017
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2017.

Sarah Anne Kuczynski

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English (Honors), The George Washington University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English who specializes in nineteenth-century American literature and poetry and poetics. I am currently completing a dissertation entitled “American Contentment (and Its Discontents),” which stages a claim for the recuperation of contentment within literary studies through an engagement with American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

 

At UNC, I have taught introductory composition courses and TA’d for Professor Thrailkill’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture course.


Publications:

• “ ‘There Is No Miracle More Cruel Than This’: Read, Relaxation, and Maternal Agency   in Plath’s Three Women” (Literature and Medicine 36.1: 2018)


Teaching Awards

• Hartsell Award for excellence in teaching first year composition, 2015


Awards

  • Mellon Graduate Five-Year Fellowship, 2013—2018
  • Robert Bain Award for outstanding achievement in nineteenth-century American literature, 2015
  • Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2018-2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Tiffany Friedman

April 15, 2018

Degrees

2014, MA in Linguistics, University of Georgia

2011, BA in English and French, University of North Carolina Wilmington

Bio

My areas of interest include rhetoric of health and medicine, rhetoric of science and religion, food rhetorics, and writing in the disciplines. More specifically, my research focuses on alternative approaches to healthcare. My current project, titled “Science Falsely So Called: The Rhetorical Ecology of Christian Science and Biomedicine in the Late Nineteenth Century,” contextualizes the development of mainstream biomedical authority by tracing the rhetorical history of Christian Science.

As part of Carolina’s Digital Literacy Initiative, my courses incorporate multimodal research and composition.  In past semesters, my students have worked with Adobe InDesign to create popular science magazine articles and conference posters. I find that composing in this new medium invigorates students and allows them to discover skills and interests that they never knew they had.


Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2016-2017

Awards

  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

  • Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry. (The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes, Issue 1, Winter 2016-17).
  • Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems. (Literature and Belief, Forthcoming, Spring 2018).
  • Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake. (The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel1660-1820, Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Ashley J. King

April 6, 2018

Degrees

BA in English & Political Science, University of California at Davis, 2007.

MA in English Literature, Purdue University, 2011.

Bio

Ashley J. King is a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation project titled, “The Calling: Embodiment, Religious Pluralism, And Vocation in The Mid-Victorian Popular Novel,” explores how Victorian novelists across the theological spectrum consider spiritual listening in relation to not only religious practice but also in the larger context of changing understandings regarding professional ethics and the professional ideal.


Awards

  • Recipient of the Frankel Dissertation Fellowship, Spring 2017.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD student in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania in 2015 with a BA in English and German, and creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My research interests are centered around the destabilization of nationalism and time in 19th century American literature.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume