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Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nora Katherine Augustine

September 9, 2019

Degrees

2011, B.A. in English Language and Literature (Honors), University of Chicago.

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature with a Graduate Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies (WGST), specializing in mental health rhetoric research (MHRR), feminist studies, and community literacy. In recent years, I have taught courses in WGST, health/medical rhetoric, popular culture, LGBTQ+ studies, and several variants of composition in/across the disciplines. I have also held research positions in public policy, developmental psychology, and urban education.

My current research tracks the circulation of “mad genius” rhetoric in contemporary American culture, investigating how popular media—especially auto/biographical narratives—imagine a link between mental illness and exceptional creativity, intelligence, and other gifts or talents. My dissertation, “Extra/Ordinary Minds: ‘Mad Genius’ Topoi and Memoirs of Mental Illness,” draws from MHRR and feminist studies to explore sociocultural factors (i.e., disability, gender, race, and class) that compel persons with mental illness to construct mad genius personae in life writing. Through case studies grounded in Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted, Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind, Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation, and Meri Nana-Ama Danquah’s Willow Weep for Me, I examine four basic mad genius topoi: 1) genius leads to madness, 2) madness confers genius, 3) madness and genius are both innate and indistinguishable, 4) madness and genius share a common source in external trauma. Reading these best-selling memoirs as individualized responses to systemic rhetorical exclusion, I argue mad genius topoi are apparently effective, yet ultimately unsustainable frameworks through which to cope with significant psychic pain.

Outside the walls of UNC, I strive to be an advocate for community literacy and the public humanities—especially initiatives that position personal writing as a source of healing. Since 2016, I have served as a volunteer support group facilitator at a women’s center in my community, designing and leading ~100 hours of writing/art/discussion-based support groups for survivors of domestic violence. As a 2019-2020 Maynard Adams Fellow for the Public Humanities, I am researching new methods for integrating MHRR and textual analysis into the para-therapeutic activity of support groups.


Publications:

  • “Facilitating Rhetoric: Paratherapeutic Activity in Community Support Groups.” In Mental Health Rhetoric Research: Toward Strategic Interventions, ed. Lisa Melonçon and Cathryn Molloy (Southern Illinois University Press, forthcoming).
  • “Broken Promise: Depression as Ex-Gifted Girl Identity in Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation.” In The Faces of Depression in Literature, ed. Josefa Ros Velasco (Peter Lang, 2020).

Teaching Awards

  • Professional Development Award, UNC Writing Program, 2020.
  • Krista Turner Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence (Inaugural Recipient), 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018.

Awards

  • Humanities Professional Pathway Award (Senior Fellow), UNC Humanities for the Public Good, 2020.
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, Carolina Public Humanities, 2019–2020.
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019.
  • Travel Award, American Comparative Literature Association, 2019.
  • Blyden Jackson and Roberta Jackson Graduate Fellowship, 2013–2014.

Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019
Photo of Savannah Foreman

Degrees

MA English (Rhetoric and Digital Humanities), Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Savannah Foreman is a first year PhD student at UNC at Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature department. Her research focuses on theories of communication dealing with emotions, mental illness, and the rhetoric of health and medicine through digital, rhetorical, and neurorhetorical lenses. She hopes to further investigate the ways that emotions are communicated and translated through the body, and how this affects the ways that digital tools are programmed to identify instances of affect.


Publications:

  • 2018, “Edgar Allan Poe and the Detective Character.” Pulse.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Matthew Scott Duncan

August 8, 2018

Degrees

BA English, Clemson University

Bio

Matt Duncan is a second-year PhD student and teaching fellow at the UNC Chapel Hill. His research explores the unique role of digital tools in shaping the composition classroom, with an emphasis on a low-bridge approach to the application of technology in writing curriculum. He is also Co-Editor of Fiction for Carolina Quarterly and is a Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative Project Management Fellow.


Awards

  • CDHI Project Management Fellowship
  • CDHI Recruitment Fellowship
  • Fred W. Shilstone Memorial Award
  • Lucy K. Rollins Award

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Sarah Anne Kuczynski

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English (Honors), The George Washington University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English who specializes in nineteenth-century American literature and poetry and poetics. I am currently completing a dissertation entitled “American Contentment (and Its Discontents),” which stages a claim for the recuperation of contentment within literary studies through an engagement with American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

 

At UNC, I have taught introductory composition courses and TA’d for Professor Thrailkill’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture course.


Publications:

• “ ‘There Is No Miracle More Cruel Than This’: Read, Relaxation, and Maternal Agency   in Plath’s Three Women” (Literature and Medicine 36.1: 2018)


Teaching Awards

• Hartsell Award for excellence in teaching first year composition, 2015


Awards

  • Mellon Graduate Five-Year Fellowship, 2013—2018
  • Robert Bain Award for outstanding achievement in nineteenth-century American literature, 2015
  • Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2018-2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

  • Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry. (The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes, Issue 1, Winter 2016-17).
  • Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems. (Literature and Belief, Forthcoming, Spring 2018).
  • Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake. (The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel1660-1820, Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD student in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania in 2015 with a BA in English and German, and creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My research interests are centered around the destabilization of nationalism and time in 19th century American literature.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume