Skip to main content

Anthony DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

Bio

Tony DiNardo is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Their main area of research deals with the value positionings of, and the cultural work performed by, the fantastic from the medieval romance to modern genre fantasy and science fiction. They have also done more conventional work in medieval and early modern theological and devotional thought from Wyclif to Donne. Other interests of theirs include Stuart historiography, faith and labor in the Victorian social novel, the poetry of the Irish literary revival, and video game narratives.


Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019
Photo of Savannah Foreman

Degrees

MA English (Rhetoric and Digital Humanities), Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Savannah Foreman is a third year PhD student at UNC at Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature department. Her research focuses on theories of communication concerning emotions, mental illness, and the rhetoric of health and medicine through digital, rhetorical, and neurorhetorical lenses. She hopes to further investigate the ways that emotions are communicated and translated through the body and how this affects the ways that digital tools are programmed to identify instances of affect.


Publications:

  • 2018, “Edgar Allan Poe and the Detective Character.” Pulse.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jane McGrail

April 25, 2019

Degrees

2017, BA English, College of the Holy Cross

Bio

Jane McGrail is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies. Her research interests include the public humanities, cultural rhetorics, feminisms and rhetorics, community literacy studies, and engaged pedagogy.


Matthew Scott Duncan

August 8, 2018

Degrees

BA English, Clemson University

Bio

Matt Duncan is a second-year PhD student and teaching fellow at the UNC Chapel Hill. His research explores the unique role of digital tools in shaping the composition classroom, with an emphasis on a low-bridge approach to the application of technology in writing curriculum. He is also Co-Editor of Fiction for Carolina Quarterly and is a Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative Project Management Fellow.


Awards

  • CDHI Project Management Fellowship
  • CDHI Recruitment Fellowship
  • Fred W. Shilstone Memorial Award
  • Lucy K. Rollins Award

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems,” Literature and Belief 37.2, 2017. 45-61.

“Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry,” The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes. Winter 2016-17.

Reference Article

“Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake,” in Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, ed. Professor April London (Cambridge University Press), forthcoming.


Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin J. Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania with a BA in English and German and a creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My dissertation, “Royal Democrats: American Dignity and the Aristocratic Impulse,” traces the nineteenth-century development of the concept of “dignity” from its origins in aristocratic exclusivity to its later association with democratic equality. I argue that a racialized logic of rank and status remains a central component of this process and underlies how many Americans conceptualize democracy. By recognizing the instability and uneven development of American ideas of dignity and democracy, we can better understand why they remain such important yet contested concepts in U.S. politics today.


Publications:

  • “‘To continue their illustrious breed’: Aristocracy, Democracy, and the Search for Dignity in The House of the Seven Gables.The Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, vol. 47 (Fall 2021). Forthcoming.
  • “Digging Up Emerson’s Garden: Competing Notions of Transcendentalist Temporality in The Dial,” American Notes and Queries (2021). Forthcoming in print. Online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0895769X.2021.1933372.
  • Review of The Introspective Art of Mark Twain by Douglas Anderson. American Literary Realism, vol. 51, no. 2 (Winter 2019), pp. 187-188.
  • “Nature in American Realism and Romanticism and the Problem with Genre.” Valley Humanities Review, vol. 6 (Spring 2015).

Awards

  • The Dr. Nancy C. Joyner Summer Research Fellowship, Graduate School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2021)
  • Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Professional Development Award, Writing Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Roy C. Moose Graduate Student Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2017, 2018)
  • Agnes Boyle O’Donnell Literature Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)
  • The Dr. George R. Struble Memorial Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume