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Ryan Carroll

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2016, BA English, George Washington University

Bio

Ryan Carroll is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. His research interests include Victorian literature, media studies, and comparative literature, with focus on how mediation was theorized and performed through literature and media technologies in Britain and Latin America. Additionally, he is interested in exploring how the 19th-century understanding of media can inform our approach to mediation in the present in the present.


Joshua Ripple

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2019, BAH English, Stanford University

2021, MA Philosophy, The New School for Social Research

Bio

I am primarily interested in 20th century Southern literature, but also have interests in philosophy, film, anthropology, science fiction, religion, comparative literature, and approximately everything else.


Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena is a PhD student, graduate research assistant with the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab, and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Additionally, Meleena is earning a certificate in Women and Gender Studies. Their research focuses on contemporary LatinX literature, queer theory, and the environmental humanities with special attention to rhetorics of advocacy. Meleena is a rare plant hobbyist, stray animal collector, and celebrator of quirks and kinks. Their aim is to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.


Sarah Schaefer Walton

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2012, BA English (Literature and Creative Writing), Virginia Tech

2015, MA English and Certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies, Virginia Tech

Bio

Sarah is a PhD candidate concentrating on the long 19th century. Her research interests include Victorian travel, British Romanticism, Austen studies, fan cultures and fandoms, and the public and digital humanities.


Teaching Awards

  • James R. Gaskin Award for Teaching Composition, 2018-2019.

Awards

  • Digital Dissertation Fellowship with Carolina Digital Humanities, 2021.
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology, 2019.
  • Humanities Professional Pathway Award with Carolina Humanities for the Public Good, 2019.

Nathan Andrew Quinn

January 21, 2021

Degrees

2016, BA English, Princeton University

Bio

Nathan possesses a strong interest in late 20th and 21st century American literature, with a particular focus on contemporary works with magical realist and “hysterical realist” elements. This interest has led him in the direction of postsecular theory and the philosophy of language.


Anthony DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

Bio

Tony DiNardo is a first-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. His research currently focuses on the theological and devotional writings of Britain from Wyclif to the Glorious Revolution, Stuart historiography, and applications of queer theory in the literature of the English Renaissance. An avid, lifelong reader of fantasy and science fiction literature, Tony also has an interest in the growing body of criticism surrounding those genres, particularly where it explores the medieval and early modern roots of the speculative and fantastic modes. Other interests of his include religion in the Victorian social novel, the poetry of the Irish literary revival, labor writing, and video game narratives.


Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rose Steptoe

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, BA English and History, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

Rose Steptoe is a first-year Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She is the graduate communications editor for the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab housed within UNC’s ECL Department. Her focus is in film studies, and she is interested in exploring questions of gender and sexuality, affect, authorship, and genre in audiovisual media. Her recent research has focused on women directors within the horror genre.


Ariannah Kubli

September 15, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, Georgia State University

Bio

Ariannah Kubli is a first-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where she specializes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. Her current scholarly interests include American literary realism and naturalism; literature and philosophy; intellectual history; and American war narratives. She’s especially interested in examining the philosophical ramifications of warfare as evidenced in the fiction of American realist and naturalist writers. More generally, Ariannah hopes that by exploring the philosophical substructures of texts, she can contribute to our understanding of the texts themselves and the historical moments from which they derive.


Awards

  • James E. Routh Outstanding English Major Award, Georgia State University, 2020

Adhy Kim

September 1, 2020

Degrees

B.A. Lawrence University

Bio

Adhy Kim is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. His research areas include speculative literature, colonialism and post-colonialism in Japan and Korea, race, and American Cold War empire. His dissertation examines literary intersections between Cold War memory and speculative natural histories.


Publications:

“Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan- Wook’s The Handmaiden,” The Journal of Global and Postcolonial Studies 7:2, special issue on postcolonial nostalgia, eds. Simon Lewis and Giusi Russo (2019)

“Japanese Melancholy and the Ethics of Concealment in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being,” Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 52:4 (Dec. 2019)