David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Katherine Stein

August 5, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature and History, Marquette University

Bio

Katherine Stein is a first-year graduate student absorbed in pursuing the lines between historical fact and fictional narrative.  Her interests include Victorian literature, Irish literature, children’s literature, reception studies, and contemporary historical fiction.


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Kimberly Burnett

October 11, 2018

Degrees

2001, BA English and Philosophy, Emory University

2004, MA English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English. My research interests include popular culture, African American performance, and black womanhood.  My dissertation examines how gospel music performance serves as both extension and projection of black feminist thought, suggesting ways that we might read the representations of black womanhood in twentieth century African American literature as a fluctuating, dynamic performances in response to contemporary noise.  I have taught composition and literature courses at UNC-Chapel Hill, Durham Technical Community College, and Saint Augustine’s University.


Publications:

  • Co-editor, The North Carolina Roots of African American Literature. General ed. William L. Andrews. University of North Carolina Press, 2005.

Awards

  • Dolores Zohrab Liebmann Fellow, 2003, 2005-2007

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature. His research focuses on exchanges among drama, philosophy, politics, and theology in pre- and post-reformation Europe. He is particularly interested in the ways reformation theology modified English theatrical tradition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Edward Hyunsoo Yang

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Literature and Political Science, Loyola Marymount University

2015, MA English, Claremont Graduate University

Bio

My research interests include the history of the novel, narrative performance, and authenticity. Drawing from British novels of the Long Eighteenth Century and Twentieth Century American novels, I hope to produce a project that examines narrative interruptions: moments in a text when a voice, distinct from that of any other character, enters the narrative.

Some of my past research examines: the performance of authenticity in The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey, competing narrative frames in Frankenstein, a blending of genres in The Castle of Otranto, resistance to introspection in Mumblecore films, and the role of authenticity in Hip Hop.


Awards

  • Fulbright, English Teaching Assistantship (Germany), 2016-17

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Lanier Walker

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Harvard University

2015, postgraduate study, History of Design, Royal College of Art/ Victoria & Albert Museum

Bio

Lanier’s research interests include early modern drama, material culture, and the history of the book. In her free time, she is an avid baker and printmaker.


Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow

Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA Critical Studies (in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film) & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire.

Bio

Emilio Taiveaho was born in Quito, Ecuador, to a Finnish Father and Ecuadorian Mother, and spent his childhood prehending—and being prehended by—the beatific and magnanimous Andes. A first-generation immigrant, Emilio moved to the United States to further his education, finishing his High School career in Winona, Minnesota, and graduating from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire in 2017. He is currently pursuing a PhD. in literature from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, where he specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century poetry and poetics across the Américas, and is interested in the intersection of aesthetics, biopolitics, performance, and visual art.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Laura Broom

April 17, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA, Davidson College

Bio

Laura Broom is currently working on her dissertation, which examines representations of trans identity in contemporary Anglophone novels.  She is also interested in body studies, particularly contested notions of gender, race, and personhood in literature and culture. Her teaching experience includes many composition courses, as well as literature classes focused on diversity, race, literary genres, and contemporary novels.  She is currently working on two pedagogy articles for publication, one on teaching trans texts and theories in the undergraduate classroom and the other on service-learning experiences at the university level.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2016
  • Earl Hartsell Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2014

Awards

  • Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life Summer Research Funding, 2017
  • Food for All: Local and Global Perspectives Micro-Grant, 2017
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Scholarship, 2012

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

María J. Durán

April 7, 2018

Degrees

  • 2013, M.A. English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill.
  • 2008, B.A. English, George Mason University.

Bio

María J. Durán is a PhD Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature and Graduate Assistant for the UNC Latina/o Studies Program. Her dissertation examines portrayals of pain in Latinx literature and the ways it can give birth to or elevate political consciousness to incite resistance and social protest in Latinx communities.

Durán has served as a guest blogger for UNC’s Institute for the Study of the Americas (ISA), and she has published in the leading Chicana/o Studies Journal, Aztlán. She has taught ENGL 105, ENGL 105i Business, ENGL 129, WGST 233, and ENGL 364.  As a theatre artist, Durán co-directed a sold-out production of In the Heights(Spring 2017), staged at The ArtsCenter in Carrboro, NC. She was invited to share her theatre work at the National Association of Latino Arts and Cultures (NALAC) Regional Arts Training in Charlotte, NC (Summer 2017). Recently, she directed a staged reading of Just Like Us, a play about undocumented youth by Karen Zacarías (March 2018). She currently serves on the PlayMakers Repertory Company Advisory Council.

Durán is an advocate for underrepresented minority education.  She has worked with The Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program (MURAP) at UNC-Chapel Hill to assist talented underrepresented undergraduate students from diverse backgrounds in their pursuit of doctoral degrees. In Summer 2015, she received the UNC Graduate School’s Richard Bland Fellowship and interned with Juntos, a North Carolina State University cooperative extension program that helps Latinx students achieve higher education. She is also a Carolina Firsts Advocate for undergraduate students and serves on the advisory board for the Carolina Grad Student F1RSTS. In her spare time, Durán enjoys visiting coffeeshops, hot yoga, traveling, and spending time with her two pet bunnies. Click here to read about Durán’s decision to pursue graduate studies and what advice she has for prospective graduate students.


Publications:

Refereed Journal Articles

  • “Bodies That Should Matter: Chicana/o Farmworkers, Slow Violence, and the Politics of (In)visibility in Cherríe Moraga’s Heroes and Saints.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol 42, no 1, 2017, pp. 45-71.

Other Publications (published under maiden name “Obando”)

  • “Harvesting Dignity: Remembering the Lives of Farmworkers.” Institute for the Study of the Americas, UNC-CH (December 2012).
  • “Latinos Reach New Highs in College Enrollment.” Institute for the Study of the Americas, UNC-CH (November 2012).

Awards

  • Ford Foundation Dissertation Fellowship, Honorable Mention (April 2018)
  • Diversity and Student Success Travel Award, The Graduate School, UNC-CH (April 2018)
  • Performing Arts Special Activities Fund Grant, Office of the Executive Vice Chancellor and Provost, UNC-CH (2017-2018)
  • Chancellor’s Doctoral Candidacy Award, Initiative for Minority Excellence, UNC-CH (Fall 2017).
  • Mellon Dissertation Grant, Institute for the Study of the Americas, UNC-CH (Summer 2017).
  • Hispanic Scholarship Fund Scholar (Spring 2017).
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNC-CH (Fall 2016).
  • Florence Brann Eble Summer Research Fellowship, The Graduate School, UNC-CH (Summer 2016).
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, The Graduate School, UNC-CH (Summer 2015).
  • Travel Grant, English and Comparative Literature, UNC-CH (Spring 2017, 2015, 2013, 2012).
  • Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program Fellowship (Summer 2008).