Savannah Bateman

September 16, 2019
Photo of Savannah Bateman

Degrees

BA English, Western Carolina University

Bio

Savannah is an M.A. student at UNC with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She is from the small town of Kitty Hawk, located on the Outer Banks, NC. She earned her B.A. in English Literature and two minors in biology and chemistry from Western Carolina University. As an undergraduate, she was primarily interested in interdisciplinary research in literature, science, and medicine. She has a work history in the Emergency Medical Services and medical transportation services, which primarily drives her research interests in the health humanities, focusing on bibliotherapy techniques in chaotic work environments, trauma theory, and rhetorical analysis of the metaphorical language and personal narratives of EMS providers.


Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019
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Degrees

MA English (Rhetoric and Digital Humanities), Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Savannah Foreman is a first year PhD student at UNC at Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature department. Her research focuses on theories of communication dealing with emotions, mental illness, and the rhetoric of health and medicine through digital, rhetorical, and neurorhetorical lenses. She hopes to further investigate the ways that emotions are communicated and translated through the body, and how this affects the ways that digital tools are programmed to identify instances of affect.


Publications:

  • 2018, “Edgar Allan Poe and the Detective Character.” Pulse.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jane McGrail

April 25, 2019

Degrees

2017, BA English, College of the Holy Cross

Bio

Jane McGrail is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research interests include historical rhetoric, the theory of knowledge, 19th Century British literature and culture, the Victorian novel, and women writers.


Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate teaching fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Matthew Scott Duncan

August 8, 2018

Degrees

BA English, Clemson University

Bio

Matt Duncan is a second-year PhD student and teaching fellow at the UNC Chapel Hill. His research explores the unique role of digital tools in shaping the composition classroom, with an emphasis on a low-bridge approach to the application of technology in writing curriculum. He is also Co-Editor of Fiction for Carolina Quarterly and is a Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative Project Management Fellow.


Awards

  • CDHI Project Management Fellowship
  • CDHI Recruitment Fellowship
  • Fred W. Shilstone Memorial Award
  • Lucy K. Rollins Award

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Tyler Bunzey

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English with Teaching Licensure, Liberty University

Bio

I study hip-hop and African-American literature post-1940, particularly how hip-hop’s compositional processes work within the spectrum of orality and literacy. I also write about religion and hip-hop inflected through post-secular theory with a focus on evangelicalism and contemporary mainstream hip-hop.


Publications:

  • “New Rhymes Over An Old Beat: A Review of Break Beats in the Bronx” (NewBlackMan In Exile, 2017, URL: http://www.newblackmaninexile.net/2017/11/new-rhymes-over-old-beat-review-of.html)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jennifer Edwell

April 23, 2018

Degrees

BA English, The Ohio State University

MTS Theology and Ethics, The Methodist Theological School in Ohio

Bio

While working on my masters at the Methodist Theological Shool in Ohio, I studied the role of narrative (especially autobiography) in religious ethics. My primary focus was on stories of marginalization; however, I became acutely aware of the theme of finitude in many personal narratives. When I came to UNC, I knew I wanted to explore these themes from a new angle. Rather than focusing on religious narratives, I investigate how people tell stories about health and the role of religion in medicine for patients, providers, and healthcare systems.

At UNC, I have studied the significance of chapels (particularly “interfaith” or psychospiritual spaces) within hospitals. Also, I was the Study Coordinator for the Writing Diabetes Study, and I have written (with my collaborators) about the impact of writing as an intervention for people with chronic illness. Finally, my dissertation investigates the rhetorical history of neonatal medicine in order to reveal the influence of antecedent religious rhetoric on the development of this subfield and to demonstrate the convergence of religion and science in contemporary accounts of premature infants.

I conceive of my research as appealing to three audiences: 1) scholars of rhetoric, 2) scholars of religion, and 3) scholars and practitioners of medicine. Thus, my research falls within the broad scope of the Medical/Health Humanities. Finally, I am exploring an interdisciplinary [or transdisciplinary] approach to rhetorical research that enacts my commitment to feminist, intersectional values.


Publications:

  • Edwell, Jennifer, Singer, Sarah, and Jordynn Jack. “Healing Arts: Rhetorical Techne as Medical (Humanities) Intervention.” Rhetoric of Health and Medicine, special issue of Technical Communication Quarterly. 27(1): 1-14. 2018.
  • Edwell, Jennifer. Medical Interiors: Materiality and Spatiality in Medical Rhetoric.” Methodologies in Rhetoric of Health and Medicine, edited by Lisa Meloncon and Blake Scott. (New York: Routledge, 2018).
  • Singer, Sarah, Weed, Kym, Edwell, Jennifer, Jack, Jordynn, and Jane Thrailkill. “Advancing Pre-Health Humanities as Intensive Research Practice: Principles and Recommendations from a Cross-Disciplinary Baccalaureate Setting.” Journal of Medical Humanities, special issue on “Pre-Health Humanities Education.” First online June 2017.
  • Edwell, Jennifer, and Jordynn Jack. “Gestational Diabetes Testing, Narrative, and Medical Distrust.” Bioethical Inquiry, symposium on “Public Trust in Expert Knowledge” edited by Silvia Camporesi, Mark Davis, and Maria Vaccarella. December 2016.

Sarah Anne Kuczynski

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English (Honors), The George Washington University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English who specializes in nineteenth-century American literature and poetry and poetics. I am currently completing a dissertation entitled “American Contentment (and Its Discontents),” which stages a claim for the recuperation of contentment within literary studies through an engagement with American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

 

At UNC, I have taught introductory composition courses and TA’d for Professor Thrailkill’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture course.


Publications:

• “ ‘There Is No Miracle More Cruel Than This’: Read, Relaxation, and Maternal Agency   in Plath’s Three Women” (Literature and Medicine 36.1: 2018)


Teaching Awards

• Hartsell Award for excellence in teaching first year composition, 2015


Awards

  • Mellon Graduate Five-Year Fellowship, 2013—2018
  • Robert Bain Award for outstanding achievement in nineteenth-century American literature, 2015
  • Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2018-2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume