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Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mindy Buchanan-King

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, MA English, College of Charleston

2001, BA Mass Communications, Emory & Henry College

Bio

Mindy Buchanan-King is a first-year Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research is focused on American literature of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century, particularly the work of female Americanists. Using archival research, she seeks to analyze how such authors as Edith Wharton, Sarah Jewett, Pauline Hopkins, and Willa Cather approached female health and her body—including sexuality, pregnancy, and menstruation—and how their conceptions may have been informed by transatlantic medical narratives. Ms. King is also keen to integrate health humanities perspectives into her work, including an understanding of how the female body is diagnosed and how literary female narratives may foster (or complicate) an empathetic understanding of the female body when administering and receiving health care.


Publications:

  • Buchanan-King, Mindy. “Joan Crawford: Problematizing the (Aging) Female Image and Sexuality in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2019): 1-23.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emily Long

September 9, 2019
Photo of Emily Long

Degrees

2019, B.S. Biology, Second Major in English with Highest Honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Emily is a Master’s student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She combines her dual interests in medicine and literature through her work in the medical humanities. Emily’s current research focuses on pre-trauma theory in nineteenth-century American literature.


Jillian Kern

August 19, 2019
Photo of Jillian Kern

Degrees

2017, MSt English 650-1550, University of Oxford

2014, BA English and Medieval/Early Modern Studies, University of California, Davis

Bio

Jillian is a first year PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. She is a medievalist with a focus on the post-conquest period ca.1100-1300. Her previous research projects have centered on the lais of Marie de France and other Anglo-French texts. Additionally, she is interested in exploring the transmission of medieval texts and medievalisms. Her research approaches include digital corpus linguistics and Natural Language Processing, feminist and gender theory, virginity studies, and queer theory.

Jillian is a recent transplant from rural Northern California to the Research Triangle, where she is working to rapidly fill her new living space with houseplants. In addition to research, she is passionate about teaching and providing student support.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Erica Sabelawski

August 12, 2019
Photo of Erica Sabelawski

Degrees

2012, BA English, Saint Michael’s College

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

Erica studies women’s literature from the Romantic era and the American Civil War with a focus on infrastructure, the history of the book, memory and trauma studies, and intellectual history.


Katherine Stein

August 5, 2019
Photo of Katherine Stein, taken by Emily Youree

Degrees

2019, Honors BA English Literature and History, Marquette University

Bio

Katherine Stein is a first-year PhD student absorbed in pursuing the lines between historical fact and fictional narrative.  She studies Victorian literature and contemporary historical fiction, with interests in British identity, reception studies, and children’s literature.


Jane McGrail

April 25, 2019

Degrees

2017, BA English, College of the Holy Cross

Bio

Jane McGrail is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research interests include historical rhetoric, the theory of knowledge, 19th Century British literature and culture, the Victorian novel, and women writers.


Don Holmes

March 11, 2019
Photo of Don Holmes

Degrees

2014, BA English (Magna Cum Luade), University of Southern Mississippi

Bio

Don Holmes is a 5th year PhD student in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests are in early African American literature, specifically the 18thand early 19thcenturies. His dissertation explores early black writers of their methods in critiquing and subverting systems of racial geographies (institutions of white supremacy). At Carolina, Don has taught English composition and currently teaches English 128: Major American Authors with a focus on lesser-known American women authors, including Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, and Grace Paley. Don has taught English composition at North Carolina Central University and will return there this summer.


Publications:

  • Holmes, Don. “a clever fellow”: The Subversive Trickster in The Narrative of Lunsford Lane (forthcoming in North Carolina Literary Review)
  • Holmes, Don and Ryan Luethje. A “charitable institution”: University of North Carolina in the Era of the Civil War” in “Persistence through Peril: Episodes of College Life and Academic Enduring in the Civil War South” (forthcoming, book chapter)
  • Holmes, Don. “Silent Sam: Geographic Marker of Violence, Politics, and the Racialized.” Lift Institute, https://www.liftinstitute.org/news/

Book Reviews:


Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

I am a PhD student studying social reform in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially in regards to gender and sexuality. I am interested in how literature of the period engages with the free love movement and utopianism. The Oneida Community and Brook Farm are two experimental utopian communities of great interest to me. Additional areas of interest include: women’s writing, sentimental fiction, gothic literature, African American literature, and the American Civil War.


Publications:

  • Matthew Teutsch and Katharine Henry, “‘Memories wasn’t a place, memories was in the mind’: the Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” Mississippi Quarterly vol. 68, no. 3-4 (2015): 511-530.

Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, Spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence in Southern Literature, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholar, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020