Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Erica Sabelawski

August 12, 2019

Degrees

2012, BA English, Saint Michael’s College

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

Erica studies women’s literature from the Romantic era and the American Civil War with a focus on infrastructure, the history of the book, memory and trauma studies, and intellectual history.


Katherine Stein

August 5, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature and History, Marquette University

Bio

Katherine Stein is a first-year graduate student absorbed in pursuing the lines between historical fact and fictional narrative.  Her interests include Victorian literature, Irish literature, children’s literature, reception studies, and contemporary historical fiction.


Bailey Fernandez

July 29, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a writer and scholar who works deeply with the poetics of British Romanticism (especially William Blake) and widely with literature’s intersection with philosophy, theology, and linguistics. He is also deeply interested with the history of the avant-garde up until the present day , which he believes begins in the Romantic period.


Awards

  • DLC Research Fellowship, UNC, 2019-20.
  • Digital Humanities Launch Program, UNC, 2019-20.

Ian Sawyer

July 29, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Ithaca College

Bio

I am a first-year PhD student in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. My interests include 20th and 21st century American literature, transatlantic modernism, and critical theory.


Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jane McGrail

April 25, 2019

Degrees

2017, BA English, College of the Holy Cross

Bio

Jane McGrail is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research interests include historical rhetoric, the theory of knowledge, 19th Century British literature and culture, the Victorian novel, and women writers.


Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

I am a PhD student studying social reform in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially in regards to gender and sexuality. I am interested in how literature of the period engages with the free love movement and utopianism. The Oneida Community and Brook Farm are two experimental utopian communities of great interest to me. Additional areas of interest include: women’s writing, sentimental fiction, gothic literature, cultural studies, and African American literature.


Publications:

Teutsch, Matthew and Katharine Henry. “‘Memories wasn’t a place, memories was in the mind’: the Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.Mississippi Quarterly vol. 68, no. 3-4 (2015): 511-530.


Awards

  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, Spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • The Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholarship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present

Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica is a PhD student in Comparative Literature and teaching assistant in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. She focuses on 19th and 20th century Russian and Eastern European literature. Her MA thesis (2013)  explored the role of death in Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Her current research interests include animal studies, atrocity, utopias/dystopias, revolutions, and the concept of death.

 

 


Awards

  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)

Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

Liz Shand is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, gender studies, and Victorian criticism. She is particularly interested in the dominant depictions of women’s reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through analyses of print culture, material studies, and the history of technology, she is interested in the way that women accessed and shared texts within and outside of dominant reading networks.

Aside from her research, Liz integrates design and digital writing in her research and pedagogy. She has developed design resources and guides for UNC’s Design Lab and for Wilson Special Collections Library and has worked in the Digital Innovation Lab.


Publications:

  • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume