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Timothy Gress

August 19, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA Philosophy and Religious Studies, Manhattan College

2021, MA English and American Literature, New York University

2021, MLIS Rare Books and Special Collections, Long Island University

Bio

Tim Gress is a PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the department of English & Comparative Literature. His research focuses primarily on the literary and cultural history of Britain during the 19th century, especially as it relates to the history of the book. Other interests include lesser-known woman writers of the late-Romantic and early-Victorian periods, the history and development of the novel in English, descriptive bibliography, and book collecting. Tim also works as a Graduate Assistant in the Rare Book Collection at Wilson Special Collections Library.


Publications:

  • A Collector’s Zeal: Treasures from the DeCoursey Fales Collection at Manhattan College. (Riverdale, New York: Manhattan College, 2020).

Awards

  • William T. Buice III Scholarship, Rare Book School, University of Virginia, 2020
  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Book School, University of Virginia, 2019
  • Edward Branigan Scholars Grant for Research in the Humanities, Manhattan College, 2018

Ryan Carroll

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2020, BA English, George Washington University

Bio

Ryan Carroll is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He is interested in media technologies and mediation as literary technology in Victorian and transatlantic literature, with focus on the way hybrid media forms serve as tools of self-theorization and possibility-making. His interests also include literary theory and form, hermeneutic phenomenology, studies of empire, and religion.

Outside of academia, Ryan writes on theology, particularly queer and liberation theology. His work has been published by theology publications and the Jesuit Conference of Canada and North America.


Publications:

Carroll, Ryan. “The Pilgrim’s Book.” The Jesuits, https://www.jesuits.org/stories/the-pilgrims-book/.

Carroll, Ryan. “Fragments of the Eschaton: Queer Christian Soteriology.” Macrina Magazine, https://macrinamagazine.com/issue-8-general/guest/2021/09/11/fragments-of-the-eschaton-queer-christian-soteriology/, September 11, 2021.


Joshua Ripple

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2019, BAH English, Stanford University

2021, MA Philosophy, The New School for Social Research

Bio

I am primarily interested in 20th century Southern literature, but also have interests in philosophy, film, anthropology, science fiction, religion, comparative literature, and approximately everything else.


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Nathan Andrew Quinn

January 21, 2021

Degrees

2016, BA English, Princeton University

Bio

Nathan possesses a strong interest in late 20th and 21st century American literature, with a particular focus on contemporary works with magical realist and “hysterical realist” elements. This interest has led him in the direction of postsecular theory and the philosophy of language.


Ariannah Kubli

September 15, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, Georgia State University

Bio

Ariannah Kubli is a second-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where she specializes in late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. Her scholarly interests include American literary realism and naturalism; Marxist theory; intellectual history; critical pedagogy; and the public humanities. Her current work explores the interplay between fiction, labor movements, and radical politics in the United States between 1880-1920. She’s particularly attentive to the ways literature encouraged and informed agitation for more equitable economic, political, and social systems, and the ways inequitable systems in turn inflected the period’s literary output.


Awards

  • James E. Routh Outstanding English Major Award, Georgia State University, 2020

Adhy Kim

September 1, 2020

Degrees

B.A. Lawrence University

Bio

Adhy Kim is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. His research areas include speculative literature, colonialism and post-colonialism in Japan and Korea, race, and American Cold War empire. His dissertation examines literary intersections between Cold War memory and speculative natural histories.


Publications:

“Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan- Wook’s The Handmaiden,” The Journal of Global and Postcolonial Studies 7:2, special issue on postcolonial nostalgia, eds. Simon Lewis and Giusi Russo (2019)

“Japanese Melancholy and the Ethics of Concealment in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being,” Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 52:4 (Dec. 2019)


Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten is a PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which she finds exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, she enjoys nurturing all forms of human and other life through her passion for plants and pets.


Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)