Christine Johns

November 13, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.A. Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University

2013, B.A. English, University of Central Florida

Bio

Christine is a doctoral student who studies critical theory, environmental literature, and science fiction. Her current research interests include literary and visual expressions of posthumanism, political theory, questions of community, and theories of space and/or place.


Jacob T. Watson

October 15, 2018

Degrees

PhD, English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Defending 2018

M.A. English, University of Georgia at Athens, 2011

B.A. English, Philosophy Minor, University of Georgia at Athens, 2009

magna cum laude

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate specializing in critical theory, film and media. I’m currently thinking about the discourses surrounding audiovisual technology in the mid-twentieth century as they pertain to the history and prehistory of American broadcast television. My other interests include graphics, speculative fiction after World War II, image theory, information theory, and screen archeology. I have taught courses on contemporary literature, digital literature, film and visual culture. I’m also an avid hiker and obsessive music lover.


Publications:

“The Suffusion of the Televisual in The Crying of Lot 49.” Style 51.2 (2017).


Teaching Awards

  • 2017-18           UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Distinguished Teaching Fellowship
  • 2015                UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Senior Teaching Fellowship

Awards

  • 2016-17           UNC Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship
  • 2016                The Eliason Dissertation Fellowship
  • 2015                The Carol and Edward Smithwick Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2015                The John R. Bittner Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Literature and Media

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nicole Berland

October 15, 2018

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

While I mostly situate my research within the fields of post-45 American speculative fiction, comics, and television, my interest in seriality’s forms and functions occasionally direct my attention towards mathematics, music, and Victorian literature, among other areas. As a Teaching Fellow at UNC, I have taught several rhetoric and composition courses, including Writing Across the Disciplines and Writing in the Social Sciences, and in the Fall of 2016 I designed and taught a section of a course entitled Literature and Cultural Diversity. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice and science fiction also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018


Awards

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005


Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

September 11, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Humanities & Writing, Houghton College, 2014

Bio

Ben Murphy is a PhD candidate in nineteenth-century American literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research draws on the history and philosophy of science (especially ecology, biology, medicine, and the social sciences), the environmental humanities, and American literature from antebellum to World War I (approx. 1830s – 1914). Writing on these topics and book reviews have appeared or are forthcoming in Mississippi Quarterly, Boundary2, symploke, and The Carolina Quarterly. His dissertation centers on vitalism, biopolitics, and discourses of crowd behavior and theory in literature of the long nineteenth century.

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, Ben teaches courses in composition and rhetoric. He has also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West. Additionally, Ben is a member of the department’s Peer Mentoring Committee, a Research Assistant in UNC’s Music Library, and the Book Review Editor at the The Carolina Quarterly.


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Travis Alexander

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English and Plan II Honors, The University of Texas at Austin

Bio

Travis is broadly invested in postwar American fiction, film, and visual art. His research specifically clusters around portrayals of the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the 1980s to the present in literary, filmic, and theoretical domains. Travis is particularly interested in the extent to which scripts governing racial representation inform these portrayals.


Publications:

PEER REVIEWED 

  • “Long Live the Old Flesh: AIDS and the Americans with Disabilities Act at Quarter Century,” symplokē (forthcoming December 2018)
  • “‘A hint of industrial espionage in the eye’: Orientalism, Essayism, and the Politics of Memory in Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video (forthcoming November 2018)

REFEREED REVIEWS

  • “Deregulating Grief: A Review of Dagmawi Woubshet’s The Calendar of Loss: Race Sexuality and Mourning in the Early Era of AIDS (Baltimore: The Johns Hopkins University Press, 2015),” boundary 2 (2017) (Web.)

Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, Spring 2017


Awards

Short Term Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2019

Summer Research Grant, Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Graduate Student Research Award, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Dean’s Distinguished Graduate, College of Liberal Arts (12 students chosen from 2,983 graduates), The University of Texas at Austin, 2013


Anneke Schwob

August 7, 2018

Degrees

2010, S.B. Literature (21L), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010, S.B. Science and Humanities (21S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate whose research interests include American literature and science, the birth of American conservation movements, periodical studies, and natural history. Archival portions of my research have been supported by fellowships from the Science Fiction Society, the Graduate School at UNC, and the Mary and David Harrison Institute at the University of Virginia. My dissertation, In Situ: Environmental Management and the American Literary Imagination, explores how popular, serialized narratives used the scientific project of wilderness exploration and conservation as a tool of literary nationalism in the decades immediately preceding the foundation of the National Parks Service. My research is informed by my background in the biological sciences and a deep personal interest in backpacking and mountaineering.


Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Dissertation Travel Fellowship, 2017
  • National Humanities Center “Humanities in Class” Internship, 2017
  • UVA Lillian Gary Taylor Visiting Fellowship in American Literature, 2017
  • SFS Mullen Research Fellowship, 2016
  • Robert A. Bain Award for Excellence in 19thCentury American Literature, 2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie Kinzinger is a third-year PhD student, who focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on multiethnic literature and critical race theory. His current research focuses on the role of social criticism in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, drama, and performance theory.


Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)