Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Remetir is a doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill writing about transpacific migration, coloniality, and gender.


Awards

  • Travel Award to attend El Mundo Zurdo Conference, 2018 (Initiative for Minority Excellence)
  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship recipient to attend summer intensive program in Filipino, 2018 (Department of U.S. Education)
  • Migration Fellow, Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, 2018 (Duke University)
  • Travel Award to attend UNC-KCL Configurations of Empire conference at King’s College London, 2017 (Institute for Arts and Humanities)
  • SEASSI Scholarship for language study, 2017 (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Future Faculty Fellow, 2017 (UNC)
  • Fulbright Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic, 2012-2013 (U.S. Department of Education)

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Moira Marquis

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2006, B.A. History, Boston College

2010, M.L.A. Literature and Philosophy, University of North Carolina at Asheville

Bio

Moira Marquis is an eco-critical decolonialist studying contemporary Anglophone novels. Her dissertation, The Dialectic of Myth: Creating Meaning in the Anthropocene, examines how contemporary Anglophone novelists are using traditional myths to tell stories about ecological destruction and climate change which offer alternatives to techno-fix futures or the apocalypse. She is also interested in the Irish language and other minor languages abilities to foster ecological understanding. Her interests are in decolonialism, eco-criticism and environmental humanities, eco-linguistics and myth.


Teaching Awards

2017  Senior Teaching Fellowship, Department of English, UNCCH
2016  Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNCCH
2015  Future Faculty Fellowship, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNCCH
2015  Professional Development Award, English Department, UNCCH
2014  Presidential Scholars Program Distinguished Teacher Award
2013-2017 UNC Chapel Hill Teaching Fellowship


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

While my interests are varied–from British Modernism to North African Cinema to RPG tabletop and videogames–my current research focuses on gender and sexuality in French and North African Film. While I usually teach French language classes, I also have a background in Women’s and Gender Studies, Global Cinema, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian Studies, and African Studies.


Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2018

Anna Carson Levett

April 24, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA French and English (with emphasis in Creative Writing), University of Pennsylvania

Bio

Anna Levett is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature. Specializing in twentieth century French/Francophone and Arabic literature, her work primarily focuses on Mediterranean studies and global modernism, with a secondary focus on film studies. Her dissertation, Mediterranean Dream-Places: The Past and Future of Surrealism in Late 20th century Arab Literature, concerns the reception of French surrealism in the Arab world. From 2015-2016, she was a fellow at the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (CASA) in Cairo, Egypt. In Fall 2018 she will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She has published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.


Publications:

  • “‘Shouldn’t Love Be the One True Thing?’ Godard and the Legacy of Surrealist Ethics,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 34.8 (Summer 2017).


Awards

  • Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France (Fall 2018)
  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC Graduate School (2016-2017)
  • Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) Fellowship, American University in Cairo (2015-2016)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (2012-2013)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, Qasid Institute, Amman, Jordan (Summer 2012)
  • FLAS – Beginning Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (Summer 2011)
  • Best Graduate Essay in Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2010-2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Palmer

April 23, 2018

Degrees

BA with Honors, English and Spanish, Samford University

Bio

Hannah is a Ph.D. candidate researching the intersections of gender and ethnicity in contemporary Mexican poetry, narrative, and film. Her dissertation examines how writers and artists deploy and/or subvert tropes of oral tradition in order to assert the centrality of Yucatec Maya women in shaping and sustaining a local indigenous culture. In addition to her regular teaching in the Romance Studies department, Hannah has developed courses incorporating Latin American and Latinx literatures, postcolonial literature and theory, and decolonial feminisms. During her time at UNC, she has served as a Lectora Visitante in the Departamento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana at the Universidad de Sevilla and as Resident Director for the UNC-Duke Consortium Yucatec Maya Summer Institute. She currently serves on the executive board of SECOLAS and is a Graduate Program Assistant at the Institute for the Study of the Americas.


Awards

  • Richmond Brown Award for Graduate Student Scholarship, Southeastern Conference of Latin American Studies, 2017
  • Summer Foreign Languages and Area Studies Grant (FLAS), Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA Critical Studies (in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film) & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire.

Bio

Emilio Taiveaho was born in Quito, Ecuador, to a Finnish Father and Ecuadorian Mother, and spent his childhood prehending—and being prehended by—the beatific and magnanimous Andes. A first-generation immigrant, Emilio moved to the United States to further his education, finishing his High School career in Winona, Minnesota, and graduating from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire in 2017. He is currently pursuing a PhD. in literature from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, where he specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century poetry and poetics across the Américas, and is interested in the intersection of aesthetics, biopolitics, performance, and visual art.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Curriculum Vitae / Resume