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Rose Steptoe

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, BA English and History, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

Rose Steptoe is a first-year English and Comparative Literature Ph.D. student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill. She is the graduate communications editor for the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab housed within UNC’s ECL Department. Her research interests include film studies, gender studies, and 20th century and contemporary American literature. Recently, her work has focused on gender and sexuality in horror films.


Adhy Kim

September 1, 2020

Degrees

B.A. Lawrence University

Bio

Adhy Kim is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. His research areas include speculative literature, colonialism and post-colonialism in Japan and Korea, race, and American Cold War empire. His dissertation examines literary intersections between Cold War memory and speculative natural histories.


Publications:

“Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan- Wook’s The Handmaiden,” The Journal of Global and Postcolonial Studies 7:2, special issue on postcolonial nostalgia, eds. Simon Lewis and Giusi Russo (2019)

“Japanese Melancholy and the Ethics of Concealment in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being,” Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 52:4 (Dec. 2019)


Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten is a PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which she finds exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, she enjoys nurturing all forms of human and other life through her passion for plants, pets, and parenting.


Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)

Rabab Husain

October 10, 2019

Degrees

2017, B.S. Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Rabab is a second-year M.A student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. Alongside her psychology degree she minored in English Literature, from which she developed an interest in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Her current research interests involve the intersection of religion, culture, and medicine via the narratives of Muslims and South Asians involved in medical humanitarianism.


Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Remetir is a doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill writing about transpacific migration, coloniality, and gender.


Awards

  • Travel Award to attend El Mundo Zurdo Conference, 2018 (Initiative for Minority Excellence)
  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship recipient to attend summer intensive program in Filipino, 2018 (Department of U.S. Education)
  • Migration Fellow, Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, 2018 (Duke University)
  • Travel Award to attend UNC-KCL Configurations of Empire conference at King’s College London, 2017 (Institute for Arts and Humanities)
  • SEASSI Scholarship for language study, 2017 (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Future Faculty Fellow, 2017 (UNC)
  • Fulbright Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic, 2012-2013 (U.S. Department of Education)

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

While my interests are varied–from British Modernism to North African Cinema to RPG tabletop and videogames–my current research focuses on gender and sexuality in French and North African Film. While I usually teach French language classes, I also have a background in Women’s and Gender Studies, Global Cinema, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian Studies, and African Studies.


Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2018