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Carson Watlington

September 20, 2021

Degrees

2020, BA English and Visual Arts, University of Richmond

Bio

Carson Watlington is a PhD student in the department of English & Comparative Literature and the Graduate Assistant for Film Studies. Her work is rooted in 20th/21st century American Literature, with a particular attention to minority and ethnic texts.


Joshua Ripple

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2019, BAH English, Stanford University

2021, MA Philosophy, The New School for Social Research

Bio

I am primarily interested in 20th century Southern literature, but also have interests in philosophy, film, anthropology, science fiction, religion, comparative literature, and approximately everything else.


Karah Mitchell

July 13, 2020

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I am a PhD candidate studying American literature of the long nineteenth century with a focus on critical animal studies, histories of natural science, and poetics. In my dissertation project, “The Call of Kind”: Humanizing the Animal in American Literature, 1830-1918, I am exploring the connections between literary genres and the emergence of the modern pet industry from Sarah Josepha Hale’s 1830 poem “Mary’s Lamb” to the establishment of the Jack London Club by the Massachusetts SPCA in 1918. I consider how poetry, pet autobiographies, and fiction were all primary means through which writers humanized animals during this period, thereby influencing material changes that were made to improve animal welfare; I postulate that works now deemed “literary” accounted in large part for the rise in pet-keeping as an industry and in modern veterinary practices. With my focus on humanization and animal welfare, I wish to build upon and complicate recent posthumanist-driven arguments in the field of American literary studies as I investigate the poetics of domestic animal care.

In my future work, I am interested in exploring how we might connect the field of critical animal studies with modern veterinary science; I thus wish to connect theory with practice with respect to animal care. I would ultimately like to develop ways for placing literary studies and veterinary science into more direct conversation with one another in a manner that is similar to, yet different from, the medical humanities.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer Vol. 27, 2019 (roundtable article from MLA 2019)

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Bailey Fernandez

June 26, 2020
Photo of Bailey Fernandez, taken by Emily Youree

Degrees

2019: B.A. English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a literary critic and scholar primarily working within the British Romantic period, though he is interested in contemporary literature as well. His thematic interests consist primarily in aesthetics, the philosophy of language, and the formal interchanges between literature, art, and music.

In addition to his scholarship, he also engages in editorial work.  He is a project assistant at The William Blake Archive and an associate editor at the Carolina Quarterly. In his spare time, he writes music and poetry.


Publications:

Sun Cycle: A Review” Carolina Quarterly no. 69, vol. 4 (Summer 2020)


Awards

Digital Innovation Lab, 2019-20


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Brendan Chambers

September 11, 2019
Photo of Brendan Chambers

Degrees

2019, BA English, Boston College

Bio

Brendan is a PhD student studying 20th century American literature.  His interests lie at the nexus of literature and phenomenology, exploring how writers across genres represent consciousness and perception in their writing.


Publications:

  • “Phenomenological Reproduction in Thompson and Mailer’s New Journalism.” Dianoia. (Spring 2019)

Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Boston College, 2019

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a PhD student and teaching fellow studying the intersections of experimental poetics, labor practices, and digital infrastructures.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emma Duvall

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Emma is a Comparative Literature student interested in ancient Greek philosophy.  Her work explores the relationship between philosophy and poetry in Plato and Aristotle.  She is also interested in language, specifically metaphor and simile.


Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

I am I fourth-year Ph.D. student studying the overlap of friendship, loyalty, and virtue in Late Medieval Romance. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. I like to write, craft, sing, travel, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, and bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”).


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Taras Vladimirovich Mikhailiuk

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2011, B. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

2013, M. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

Bio

My research focuses on the unsayable in British Romantic poetry, particularly in the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. I am interested in examining how philosophical, social, and political concerns underscore uses of the unsayable at the level of grammar and poetic diction. I also serve as an Assistant Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal.


Publications:

  • David Biespiel, The Education of a Young Poet (Berkeley: Counterpoint Press, 2017), reviewed for Carolina Quarterly. May 10, 2018
  • Audrey Wasser, The Work of Difference: Modernism, Romanticism, and the Production of Literary Form (New York: Fordham University Press, 2016), reviewed for Comparative Literature Studies, (forthcoming)
  • A Short Story: Interspersed with Poetry; What You Please, Or, Memoirs of Modern Characters; The Forest of St. Bernardo; The Monk’s Daughter; Or, Hypocrisy Punished; The Maiden Wife; Or, Heiress of De Coursey, entries for The Cambridge Guide to Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660–1820,(forthcoming in 2020)

Teaching Awards

  • College of Education Outstanding Student Teacher, Middle Tennessee State University, 2011

Awards

  • The William R. Wolfe Graduate Writing Award (Honorable Mention), Middle Tennessee State University, 2012
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Graduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2011
  • ETS Recognition of Excellence (PRAXIS), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Martha Hixon Creative Expression Award (First Place, Poetry), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Undergraduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2009

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.