Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:


Awards

  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, MEMS UNC, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Elizabeth Shand

October 10, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA in English and Correlate in Art History, Vassar College

Bio

Liz Shand is a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Her research stitches together questions from media studies, book history, gender studies, and Victorian criticism. She is particularly interested in the dominant depictions of women’s reading in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Through analyses of print culture, material studies, and the history of technology, she is interested in the way that women accessed and shared texts within and outside of dominant reading networks.

Aside from her research, Liz integrates design and digital writing in her research and pedagogy. She has developed design resources and guides for UNC’s Design Lab and for Wilson Special Collections Library and has worked in the Digital Innovation Lab.


Publications:

  • “Enfolded Narrative in The Tenant of Wildfell Hall: Refusing ‘a perfect work of art’, Brontë Studies (forthcoming)
  • “Women’s Reading as Protest in Gissing’s The Odd Women: ‘I’ll see how I like this first,’” English Literature in Transition, 1880-1920 62:1 (2019): 53-71.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2017-2018

Awards

  • Elsie Van Dyck Dewitt Scholarship Fund Fellowship (2018/2019)
  • Rare Book School Director’s Fellowship (2018)
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Course Fellowship (2018)
  • North American Victorian Studies Association Travel Grant (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Initiative Fellow (2017)
  • Digital Literacy Curricular Development Fellowship (2017)
  • The Robert M. and Janet Lumiansky Graduate Student Excellence Fund in English (2016)
  • W. Bruce Lea Jr. Graduate Fund in English (2016)
  • Ford Scholar, Vassar College (2010)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature. His research focuses on exchanges among drama, philosophy, politics, and theology in pre- and post-reformation Europe. He is particularly interested in the ways reformation theology modified English theatrical tradition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Erik Maloney

July 27, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA in English and Comparative Literature, summa cum laude, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

My research focuses on exchanges among literature, science, philosophy, and theology in early modern Europe.


Awards

  • 2016-17, North Carolina Native American Incentive Grant
  • 2016-17, Ruth Rose Richardson award for the outstanding record in the first year of graduate study

Ashley Werlinich

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA in English Literature, University of Pittsburgh

Bio

Ashley Werlinich is an English Literature doctoral student and teaching fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is interested in the intersections between 17th century natural philosophy, medicine, and drama—primarily in considering how these intersections can help us understand questions of body and embodiment in early modern literature. In addition to her work as a graduate teaching fellow, Ashley also works as a rare books and special collections instructor with Wilson Library Special Collections.


Publications:

  • David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Katharine Landers, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich, “‘Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance,” Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: emcIMPRINT, forthcoming).

Awards

  • Triangle University Internship Program, Spring 2018

Lanier Walker

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Harvard University

2015, postgraduate study, History of Design, Royal College of Art/ Victoria & Albert Museum

Bio

Lanier’s research interests include early modern drama, material culture, and the history of the book. In her free time, she is an avid baker and printmaker.


Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Migrations Lab at Duke University Department of English. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of  the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Data Plus Project Fellow, Information Initiative, Duke University. $2500, 2018.
  • UNC/King’s College Fund, The Institute for Arts and the Humanities, UNC-CH, $1980. 2018.
  • Migrations Fellow, Dept. of English, Duke University. $750, 2017
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2017.

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemologial mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies, but are also foundational to early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Awards

  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow at the Huntington Library, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Shakespeare Association of America Graduate Student Travel Award, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass. 2017
  • Bibliographical Society of America Scholarship for travel to “Bibliography Among the Disciplines,” 2017
  • Association for Computers and the Humanities Travel Bursary to Digital Humanities Summer Institute, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI: Critical Documentary and Genetic Editing taught by Elena Pierazzo and Peter Stokes, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish and Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, 2017
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, 2016
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book: Technology and Texts, 2016
  • Pre-Dissertation Travel Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume