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Kara Rush

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2022, MA English, Virginia Tech

2019, BA English, Virginia Commonwealth University

Bio

Kara Rush is a first-year Ph.D. student specializing in early modern literature. In particular, Rush is interested in how early modern English authors use  threatening nature and femininity to mediate anxieties concerning the preservation and contamination of English national identity. Other interests include adaptation studies and late medieval literature.


Publications:

  • “Nobility, Interrupted: The Queer Poetics of Vandana Kataria’s Noblemen.Borrowers and Lenders. Forthcoming Fall 2024.

Awards

  • Caroline Pace Chermside Award for Best Master’s Thesis: Virginia Tech, 2022.
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in aid, “An Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas,” taught by Marcy North, Claire M. L. Bourne, and Whitney Trettien, 2023.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andreley Bjelland

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2020, MA English, Texas Christian University

2019, BA English, Texas Christian University

Bio

Andreley Bjelland is a PhD student and teaching fellow. Her research interests include crime, gender, and religion in the early modern period.


Awards

  • Druscilla French Graduate Student Excellence Award, 2021

Krista Wiese Telford

August 3, 2022

Degrees

2022, BA English, Meredith College

Bio

Krista Telford is a second-year PhD student at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Her research examines forms of prayer in medieval and early modern literature as well as the impact of form on medieval depictions of the afterlife. She aims to take an interdisciplinary approach in her research, considering the performative aspect of many poems and prayers and drawing on musicological research. Krista’s recent and ongoing work includes a project exploring resistance to transcendence in the ending of Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde, which examines Chaucer’s reading of Boethius, and a paper exploring the polyphonic and dialogic nature of Francesco Suriano’s underexamined 15th century treatise on the Holy Land, Il trattato di Terra Santa e dell’Oriente.


Awards

  • Fall 2022-Present Graduate Teaching Fellow, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2024 Breen Award for Outstanding Work in Medieval Studies, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature
  • 2024 Donald R. Howard Travel Scholarship, The New Chaucer Society
  • 2024 LSP Teaching Fellowship, UNC Chapel Hill Latina/o Studies Program
  • 2023 Travel Grant, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature
  • 2023 Ruth Rose Richardson Award for outstanding performance in the first year of graduate
    study, UNC Chapel Hill, Department of English & Comparative Literature

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Cate Rivers

September 24, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, North Carolina State University

Bio

Cate Rivers is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. She graduated from North Carolina State University in 2019 with a BA in English and minors in history and Japan studies. Her main area focuses are the Southern United States and Japan. Her interests span trauma studies, nationalism, memory, gender and critical race theories, modernism, cultural representations of mental illness, mysticism, and Buddhist literature. Her ongoing research project frames 20th century Japanese novels and novels from the Southern Renaissance as social histories, with particular attention to war memory, family history, culpability, the construction of “family,” and the relation between national identity and self-conception.


Everett Lang

September 20, 2021

Degrees

2010, B.A. (Hons) Literae Humaniores, University of Oxford

2018, M.A. Ancient Greek and Latin, Boston College

Bio

Everett Lang studies Ancient Greek and Latin literature, primarily from the Roman Imperial period, and its later reception in Early Modern Britain and northern Europe.


Sarah Lofstrom

August 9, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, Mount Holyoke College

Bio

My scholarly interests naturally converge around questions of trauma, ethics, affect, and divergent subjectivities in narratives of resistance and reconciliation. My work is grounded in an intersectional feminist hermeneutic lens to explore the role of gender, sexuality, and settler colonialism in texts by contemporary American multiethnic women writers. I am also interested in speculative imagery and it’s significance in illuminating historically silenced facets of subjectivity. Psychoanalytic criticisms surrounding haunting and trauma, in conjunction with an exploration of queer women’s psyches as sites for potential violence or intimacy are also uniquely compelling to me. My work asks how/why ‘deviant affects’ are labeled as such, and why the burden of silencing those affects largely falls on “marginalized” folks, i.e. queer and trans women of color?


Amy Yue-Yin Chan

August 5, 2021

Degrees

2018, BA Classics, minors French & English, summa cum laude, University of Pennsylvania

Bio

I study classics and US poetry from the mid-19th to the mid-20th centuries. One of the central concepts that I explore for my dissertation is the influence of Platonism on ideas of originality and individuality in the American poetic tradition. My study ranges from the Transcendentalists Ralph Waldo Emerson and Margaret Fuller to Walt Whitman to the belated Harlem Renaissance poet Melvin B. Tolson. An earlier version of this concept, entitled “Du Bois as the American Poet,” won the Graduate Student Conference Paper Award from the R. W. Emerson Society in 2023.
My interest in classical reception in US poetry first began in a modernism seminar that I took as a senior at Penn, and my interest in Plato began upon reading the Meno during a semester abroad at Cambridge.

Publications:

Scholarship:

  • “Review of The Oxford Handbook of Emily Dickinson.” Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin 35.1 (2023), 19-20.

Poems et al.:

  • “On Hudson River.” Bayou (forthcoming).
  • My Mother Says.” Rattle 83 (2024).
  • Flux. BlazeVOX: Fall 2021, 412-18.
  • Lai-jee.” Indiana Review 43.1 (2021), 85-92.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2023

Awards

External:

  • Graduate Student Conference Paper Award, Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, 2023
  • Dickinson Critical Institute Grant, Emily Dickinson International Society, 2022

Internal:

  • Bain Award (Excellence in Pre-1900 American Lit.), UNC-CH DOECL, 2023
  • Travel Grant, UNC-CH DOECL, 2023
  • Transportation Grant, UNC-CH Graduate School, 2022
  • Travel Award, UNC-CH Graduate & Professional Student Government, 2022
  • Booker Fellowship, UNC-CH DOECL, 2021
  • Inclusive Excellence Top-Up, UNC-CH Graduate School, 2021

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena (they/she) is a first-generation US-American and college graduate now working towards a doctoral degree in English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill. Meleena has vested interests in queer theory and gender studies, environmental humanities, and disability studies. Drawing from a reproductive justice framework, Meleena specializes in the representations of children in contemporary Latinx literature. 
 
Meleena is a teaching fellow in DOECL and in Women’s and Gender Studies. They serve as the program coordinator for the Latina/o Studies Program, the administrative assistant for UndocuCarolina, and the senior writing coordinator for the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprenticeship Program. Meleena hopes to unite their service work and their research by partnering with various organizations on and off campus to invigorate their pedagogy and foster more formidable local ties. They aim to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.

Teaching Awards

Fall 2021 Latina/o Studies Graduate Teaching Affiliate Fellowship


Antonia DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

Bio

Toni DiNardo is a fourth year PhD student in the department of English and Comparative literature. Once described by a colleague as a “medievalismist,” her work is predominantly concerned with the mediation of medieval thought and constructions of the middle ages in modern genre fantasy. She is particularly interested in the use of what Umberto Eco called “the Middle Ages as pretext” as a backdrop for the construction and sustenance of socio-political identities, from bucolic queer medievalisms to white nationalist idealization of a putatively ethno-nationalist Middle Ages. Toni has given talks on the fraught intersection of fantasy and conceptions of “historical accuracy” and on the co-opting of popular fantasy franchises as recruiting tools by far-right groups, and in 2023 she held the Hanes Graduate Fellowship, studying the annotations and marginalia of C. S. Lewis’ personal collection of medieval and early modern texts.


Awards

  • Hanes Graduate Fellowship, Rare Book Collection, Louis Round Wilson Library, 2023

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jonathan Albrite

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2008, BA English, James Madison University

2020, MA English, James Madison University

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature at UNC. I am currently at work on my dissertation, tentatively titled “No Judgment: The Aesthetics of Neutrality in the Postwar American Novel,” which examines the productive tension that arises between neutral narrators and snobby characters in the decades immediately following the Second World War. More broadly, my research concerns expressions of taste and aesthetic judgment in American literature and film as they relate to discourses on race, gender, sexuality, and class. I also work on topics, including climate change and posthumanist aesthetics, related to the environmental humanities, and have taught courses on contemporary literature, film, and composition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume