Rebecca Rae Garonzik

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2009, MA Comparative Literature, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2005, BA Spanish, Goucher College

Bio

Rebecca Garonzik is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. Her areas of specialization are twentieth and twenty-first century Latin American and Latinx literatures. She is currently completing her dissertation, “Eros Galvanized: Critical Intersections of Eroticism and Politics in Contemporary Latin American and Latina/o/x Literatures (1965-2011),” under the direction of Juan Carlos González Espitia. In addition to her research on socially committed literature, Rebecca has also published work on poetics and Foucauldian discourse analysis. She is the founding co-president of the Literatures of the Americas working group.


Publications:

  • “Beyond Marcuse: Guevara’s Influence on the Revolutionary Erotic in Julio Cortázar’s Libro de Manuel.” A Contracorriente 13.2 (Winter 2016): 1-24. Web. 8 March 2016.
  • “Deconstructing Psychiatric Discourse and Idealized Madness in Cristina Rivera Garza’s Nadie me verá llorar.” Chasqui: Revista de Literatura Latinoamericana 43.1 (May 2014): 3-14.
  • “‘To name that thing without a name’: Linking Poetry and the Child’s Voice in Sandra   Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street.” Letras Femeninas 37.2 (Winter 2011): 139-55.
  • “Queering Feminism: Cristina Rivera Garza’s La cresta de Ilión and the Feminine Sublime.” Cuaderno Internacional de Estudios Humanísticos y Literatura 14 (Fall 2010): 45-56.
  • “Permanencias de Juan Rulfo en la crítica contemporánea.” Rev. of Ecos y murmullos en la obra de Rulfo, Ed. Julio Moguel and Enrique Sáinz. Confluencia 24.2 (Spring 2009): 151-53.

Awards

  • Frankel Dissertation Fellowship
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Helen Carroll Shelley Prize in Romance Languages

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a doctoral student in English and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her work lies at the intersection of queer and transgender studies, poststructuralist feminist theorizing, and American culture studies. She is particularly interested in representations of non-normative gendered embodiments and transgressive sexualities in 20th century multiethnic American literature. In May of 2017, Rachel received the Winchester Fellowship from her alma mater to prepare for comprehensive exams and conduct preliminary research for her prospectus. She has also worked in the emerging field of health humanities by helping convene the 2016 Health Humanities Exchange conference at UNC-CH and serving as director of the of Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium for the 2016-2017 academic year.

 


Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA Critical Studies (in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film) & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire.

Bio

Emilio Taiveaho was born in Quito, Ecuador, to a Finnish Father and Ecuadorian Mother, and spent his childhood prehending—and being prehended by—the beatific and magnanimous Andes. A first-generation immigrant, Emilio moved to the United States to further his education, finishing his High School career in Winona, Minnesota, and graduating from the University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire in 2017. He is currently pursuing a PhD. in literature from the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill, where he specializes in twentieth- and twenty-first-century poetry and poetics across the Américas, and is interested in the intersection of aesthetics, biopolitics, performance, and visual art.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Marcy Pedzwater

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA Literature, BA Spanish, University of North Carolina Asheville

Bio

Marcy Pedzwater studies twentieth-century North and Latin American literature. Her current research interests include the intersections of race, gender, and colonialism/imperialism in the Americas. She is also interested in the function of memory, archive, and trauma in twentieth-century texts. She currently teaches Spanish 105.


Caroline Porter

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Language and Literature, University of South Carolina

2015, MA English Literary and Literary Theory, University of Kansas

Bio

I work on Contemporary Multi-Ethnic American Literature, critical race theory, space and place/human geography, and feminist theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rachael Isom

April 22, 2018

Degrees

  • 2013, MA English, Murray State University
  • 2011, BA English, Murray State University

Bio

Rachael Isom is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She studies the intersections of religious and poetic identity in nineteenth-century British women’s writing, with particular interest in Romantic-era discourses of enthusiasm, reflection, and feminine restraint. Her dissertation project, “Enthusiastic Poetics and the Woman Writer, 1806-1856,” traces the development of the female enthusiast from Mary Shelley to Elizabeth Barrett Browning. Isom’s work has recently appeared or is forthcoming in Essays in RomanticismThe Journal of Commonwealth LiteratureStudies in Romanticism, and the Keats-Shelley Review. Currently, she serves as Managing Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal and works as a Project Assistant for the William Blake Archive.


Publications:

  • “Prophetic Poetics and Enthusiasm in Mary Shelley’s Valperga,” Studies in Romanticism, forthcoming.
  • “John Watson Dalby’s Poetic Reception of Mary Shelley’s Valperga,” Keats-Shelley Review, forthcoming.
  • “‘With Faithful Pencil’: Pastoral and Picturesque Composition in Beachy Head,” in Placing Charlotte Smith, ed. Jacqueline M. Labbe and Elizabeth A. Dolan (Lehigh University Press, forthcoming).
  • “‘Do you think I can’t read between the lines?’: Discourse of the Unsaid in J. M. Coetzee’s Diary of a Bad Year,” The Journal of Commonwealth Literature 53.1 (2018): 7-20.
  • “‘Habituat[ing] to Reflection’: Hannah More’s Romantic Novel,” Essays in Romanticism 23.1 (2016): 95-112.
  • “Caroline Fry’s Death, and Other Poems in Conversation with the Night Thoughts of Edward Young,” New Perspectives on the Eighteenth Century 2.1 (2014): 63-74.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching First-Year Composition, 2015

Awards

  • W. M. Keck Foundation Short-Term Research Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2018-2019
  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts & Sciences, University of North Carolina, 2018-2019
  • Evan Frankel Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina, 2017
  • NAVSA Travel Grant, North American Victorian Studies Association, 2017
  • DHSI Tuition Scholarship, “XML: Applications for Historical and Literary Research,” Digital Humanities Summer Institute, University of Victoria, 2017
  • Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, University of North Carolina, 2016
  • Graduate Innovation Assistantship, Committee for Institutional Studies and Research, Office of the Provost, Murray State University, 2012-2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemologial mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies, but are also foundational to early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Awards

  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow at the Huntington Library, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Shakespeare Association of America Graduate Student Travel Award, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass. 2017
  • Bibliographical Society of America Scholarship for travel to “Bibliography Among the Disciplines,” 2017
  • Association for Computers and the Humanities Travel Bursary to Digital Humanities Summer Institute, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI: Critical Documentary and Genetic Editing taught by Elena Pierazzo and Peter Stokes, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish and Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, 2017
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, 2016
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book: Technology and Texts, 2016
  • Pre-Dissertation Travel Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mark Collins

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2011, B.A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

2012, M.A. History, Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Mark Collins is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in the fields of contemporary American and multi-ethnic literature and women’s and gender studies. His academic interests include: feminist theory, science and technology studies, critical race theory, and cultural studies. Mark is currently working on his dissertation project, called “Nuclear Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Reproductive Control in US Cold War Speculative Fiction,” which explores the relationship between the discourses of nuclear warfare and reproduction in literary and cultural texts from the decades spanning the Cold War period.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume