David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Jillian Kern

August 19, 2019

Degrees

2017, MSt English 650-1550, University of Oxford

2014, BA English and Medieval/Early Modern Studies, University of California, Davis

Bio

Jillian is a first year PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. She is a medievalist with a focus on the post-conquest period ca.1100-1300. Her previous research projects have centered on the lais of Marie de France and other Anglo-French texts. Additionally, she is interested in exploring the transmission of medieval texts and medievalisms. Her research approaches include digital corpus linguistics and Natural Language Processing, feminist and gender theory, virginity studies, and queer theory.

Jillian is a recent transplant from rural Northern California to the Research Triangle, where she is working to rapidly fill her new living space with houseplants. In addition to research, she is passionate about teaching and providing student support.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emily Youree

August 12, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Samford University

Bio

Emily Youree is a PhD student studying medieval British literature. She is especially interested in reception and adaptations of Roman texts and traditions in medieval works.


Katherine Stein

August 5, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature and History, Marquette University

Bio

Katherine Stein is a first-year graduate student absorbed in pursuing the lines between historical fact and fictional narrative.  Her interests include Victorian literature, Irish literature, children’s literature, reception studies, and contemporary historical fiction.


Bailey Fernandez

July 29, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a writer and scholar who works deeply with the poetics of British Romanticism (especially William Blake) and widely with literature’s intersection with philosophy, theology, and linguistics. He is also deeply interested with the history of the avant-garde up until the present day , which he believes begins in the Romantic period.


Awards

  • DLC Research Fellowship, UNC, 2019-20.
  • Digital Humanities Launch Program, UNC, 2019-20.

Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019

Degrees

MA English, Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Hello, my name is Savannah Foreman. I’m a current PhD student in the English department at UNC. I’m passionate about teaching, reading, and writing.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

Bio

Doug Stark is a PhD student in the English program at UNC, Chapel Hill. His research appraises the role of play and experimentation across literature, film, video games, and new media. Drawing on his background in game studies, Germanophone media theory, and continental philosophy, Doug’s thinking concerns the conditions of possibilities for forms of play transhistorically and transculturally. He asks: what are the epistemic, cultural, and technical preconditions for the emergence of forms of play? For example, why do we have computer game play as we know it today? Why the ostentatious play of baroque wigs in the late eighteenth century? Across time and space, Doug contends, we can see a complex enmeshment of cultural values, forms of knowledge, and technical development refracted through the medium of play. Currently focusing on post-war aleatory aesthetics, Doug is particularly interested in forms of play that seem to operate in excess of epistemic paradigms of thought.

Doug also has forthcoming work on video game literature and Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the content of the course will engage in some way with games and play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Extrapolation. (Forthcoming)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, Second Edition, edited by Mark J. P. Wolf. (Forthcoming)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nicole Berland

May 23, 2019

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

Although I came to UNC to study later-Victorian monster fiction, my obsessive Star Trek fandom redirected my research interests toward science fiction television seriality. As an educator, I likewise encourage my students to leverage their passions toward their academic work. I have taught several composition courses at UNC, including Writing Across the Disciplines and Writing in the Social Sciences, and in the Fall of 2016 I designed and taught a section of a course entitled Literature and Cultural Diversity. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice, music, and tae kwon do also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018


Awards

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005


Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:


Awards

  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, MEMS UNC, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.