Emily Long

September 9, 2019
Photo of Emily Long

Degrees

2019, B.S. Biology, Second Major in English with Highest Honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Emily is a Master’s student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She combines her dual interests in medicine and literature through her work in the medical humanities. Emily’s current research focuses on pre-trauma theory in nineteenth-century American literature.


Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Erica Sabelawski

August 12, 2019

Degrees

2012, BA English, Saint Michael’s College

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

Erica studies women’s literature from the Romantic era and the American Civil War with a focus on infrastructure, the history of the book, memory and trauma studies, and intellectual history.


Don Holmes

March 11, 2019

Degrees

2014, BA English (Magna Cum Luade), University of Southern Mississippi

Bio

Don Holmes is a 5th year PhD student in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests are in early African American literature, specifically the 18thand early 19thcenturies. His dissertation explores early black writers of their methods in critiquing and subverting systems of racial geographies (institutions of white supremacy). At Carolina, Don has taught English composition and currently teaches English 128: Major American Authors with a focus on lesser-known American women authors, including Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, and Grace Paley. Don has taught English composition at North Carolina Central University and will return there this summer.


Publications:

  • Holmes, Don. “a clever fellow”: The Subversive Trickster in The Narrative of Lunsford Lane (forthcoming in North Carolina Literary Review)
  • Holmes, Don and Ryan Luethje. A “charitable institution”: University of North Carolina in the Era of the Civil War” in “Persistence through Peril: Episodes of College Life and Academic Enduring in the Civil War South” (forthcoming, book chapter)
  • Holmes, Don. “Silent Sam: Geographic Marker of Violence, Politics, and the Racialized.” Lift Institute, https://www.liftinstitute.org/news/

Book Reviews:


Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

I am a PhD student studying social reform in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially in regards to gender and sexuality. I am interested in how literature of the period engages with the free love movement and utopianism. The Oneida Community and Brook Farm are two experimental utopian communities of great interest to me. Additional areas of interest include: women’s writing, sentimental fiction, gothic literature, cultural studies, and African American literature.


Publications:

Teutsch, Matthew and Katharine Henry. “‘Memories wasn’t a place, memories was in the mind’: the Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman.Mississippi Quarterly vol. 68, no. 3-4 (2015): 511-530.


Awards

  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, Spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • The Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholarship, UNC Graduate School, 2015-Present

Karah Marie Mitchell

February 4, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I focus on nineteenth-century American poetry with special attention to critical animal studies, transatlantic language theories, historical poetics, Native American poetry, and the history of science.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Leslie Rowen

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA English, Bellarmine University

Bio

Leslie Rowen’s focuses her research on 19th & 20th Century American Literature, with a particular interest in war and legacy. Other topics include crime, violence, trauma studies, and memory.


Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Articles

  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading,” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (forthcoming)
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 47: Issue 3, 317-332, 2018.
  • “Reformatted / Re-fleshed: Gender, the Internet and New Configurations for Embodiment.” Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism: Vol. 7: No. 1, 2014.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Ruth Richardson Award for Outstanding Academic Performance in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2018

Anneke Schwob

August 7, 2018

Degrees

2010, S.B. Literature (21L), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

2010, S.B. Science and Humanities (21S), Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Bio

I am a doctoral candidate whose research interests include American literature and science, the birth of American conservation movements, periodical studies, and natural history. Archival portions of my research have been supported by fellowships from the Science Fiction Society, the Graduate School at UNC, and the Mary and David Harrison Institute at the University of Virginia. My dissertation, In Situ: Environmental Management and the American Literary Imagination, explores how popular, serialized narratives used the scientific project of wilderness exploration and conservation as a tool of literary nationalism in the decades immediately preceding the foundation of the National Parks Service. My research is informed by my background in the biological sciences and a deep personal interest in backpacking and mountaineering.


Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Dissertation Travel Fellowship, 2017
  • National Humanities Center “Humanities in Class” Internship, 2017
  • UVA Lillian Gary Taylor Visiting Fellowship in American Literature, 2017
  • SFS Mullen Research Fellowship, 2016
  • Robert A. Bain Award for Excellence in 19thCentury American Literature, 2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie Kinzinger is a third-year PhD student, who focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.