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Madison Storrs

July 24, 2023

Degrees

2017, BA English, Florida State University

2021, MA English, North Carolina State University

 

Bio

Madison Storrs is a first-year PhD student and Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. Her research focuses on the intersections of literature, botany, and art of the long 19th century in Britain. In particular, she considers how women incorporated botanical studies into their writing and art practices. She is also interested in British Romanticism, ecocriticism, ontology, aesthetics, design, and visual culture.


Awards

Teaching Assistantship, First-Year Writing, North Carolina State University, 2020–2021.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Satoshi Ohnishi

July 20, 2023

Degrees

2018, BA Literature, the representative of the graduates, Waseda University

2020, MA Education, Waseda University

Bio

Satoshi Ohnishi is a first year Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature.  His research focuses on the relationship between 19th-century American literature and visual media, including the camera obscura and the daguerreotype. Also, he is currently interested in the representation of aging in American literature and African American literature.


Awards

  • Okuma Memorial Scholarship, Waseda University, 2018
  • Fulbright Foreign Student Program, the Japan-United States Educational Commission, 2023-2024

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Celeste Seifert

October 5, 2022

Degrees

2018, MA English, New York University

2016, BA English, University of California, Los Angeles

Bio

Celeste is a graduate student in UNC’s English and Comparative Literature Department. They work as a teaching fellow for the department, an assistant at The William Blake Archive, and for the Jane Austen Summer Program. Celeste is currently interested in exploring ideas of apocalypse and ruin in the Long Nineteenth-Century.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Joshua Cody Ward

September 8, 2022

Degrees

2022, MA English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

2016, BA Religious Studies, Wingate University

Bio

A North Carolina native, Joshua Cody Ward joined the program in Fall 2022. His field is Modern and Contemporary American literature broadly (1900-Present), and specifically Literature of the American South, the Appalachian South, and African American Literature. His research interests include the archive, textual studies, editorial scholarship, intertextuality, and the Novel, though he is also an avid scholar of Cormac McCarthy and of Thomas Wolfe. His prospective dissertation will engage with Articulations of Appalachia, both scholarly and literary, centering on the political and aesthetic stakes of defining the Southern Appalachian range across the 20th century into the contemporary.

He is currently a Digital Content Coordinator for the Latina/o Studies Program, a Junior Coordinator for the Critical Speakers Series, a Graduate Lecture Series coordinator, and a Board Member (2023-2026) for the Thomas Wolfe Society. He is also on the committee for the 2024 Durham, NC conference for the Thomas Wolfe Society, and is an occasional Reviewer for the The Cormac McCarthy Journal. As a junior scholar, his work has been accepted or published in several journals and essay collections, and he has presented his work at over 20 academic conferences.


Publications:

  • “Darkness on the Edge of Town: Beat Subject Formation, Black Ontology, and Fugitivity as Gnosis in Cormac McCarthy’s Suttree.” In This Country’s Hard on People: Cormac McCarthy and American Identity, edited by Vernon Cisney. Forthcoming.
  • “Weird Object Relations, Ecology, and Apocalypse in Cormac McCarthy’s The Passenger and Stella Maris.” In New Perspectives on Cormac McCarthy: Encountering The Passenger and Stella Maris, edited by Jonathan Elmore and Rick Elmore. Forthcoming.
  • “Publishing the Black Arts Movement: Editors, Anthologies, and Canonization.” South Atlantic Review, vol. 88, no. 2-3, 2023, pp. 157-170.
  • “From Commas to Cosmos: The Pervading Influence of Thomas Wolfe on Cormac McCarthy.” The Thomas Wolfe Review, vols. 44 & 45, nos. 1 & 2, 2020 & 2021, pp. 8-25.
  • [album] The Boron Heist. Ridin’ Rough. Mystery School Records, April 6 2019.
  • “Light and Darkness, Sight and Blindness: Religious Knowledge in Cormac McCarthy’s Outer Dark.Wingate Research Review, issue 8, Fall 2016, pp. 87-106.
  • “Raison d’être.” Wingate University Counterpoint, Spring 2013, p. 9.
  • “On Testing.” Wingate University Counterpoint, Spring 2013, p. 23.

Awards

  • Graduate Teaching Fellow, Fall 2022-Present, UNC Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature Department.
  • Travel Grant, Fall 2023, UNC Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature Department.
  • Emerging Scholar Award, Summer 2023, UNC Chapel Hill, Southern Futures program.
  • John R. Bittner Student Literary Prize, May 27th 2023, Thomas Wolfe Society Conference.
  • LSP Teaching Fellowship, Spring 2023, UNC Chapel Hill Latina/o Studies Program.
  • Graduate Student Transportation Grant, Spring 2023, UNC Chapel Hill, Graduate School.
  • Languages & Literatures Graduate Student Paper Award Recipient, February 23rd 2023, 44th Annual SWPACA Conference.
  • 2021 Graduate Student Essay Award Recipient, November 12th 2022, SAMLA 94.
  • Travel Grant, Fall 2022, UNC Chapel Hill, English and Comparative Literature Department.
  • The Julian D. Mason Award for Excellence in Graduate Studies, April 29th 2022, UNC Charlotte, English Department.
  • Graduate Teaching Assistantship, Fall 2020-Spring 2022, UNC Charlotte, English Department.
  • Wittliff Collections William Hill Research Award, 2021-2022, Texas State University, For archival research conducted July 2021 in the Cormac McCarthy Papers and Woolmer Collections.
  • Anne Newman Graduate Student Travel Grant, Fall 2021, UNC Charlotte.
  • Excellence in Philosophy Award, April 24th 2016, Wingate University, Religious Studies Department.
  • G. Byrns Coleman Award for Excellence in Religious Studies, April 24th 2016, Wingate University, Religious Studies Department.
  • University Honors, April 24th, 2016, Wingate University.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Angelique Bassard

August 22, 2022

Degrees

2013, BA English, Wake Forest University

2020, MEd Curriculum and Instruction, Virginia Commonwealth University

Bio

Angelique Bassard is a second-year PhD student and Teaching Fellow in the English and Comparative Literature program at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She received her Bachelor of Arts degrees in English from Wake Forest University and a Master of Education from Virginia Commonwealth University. Her research area is American Literature throughout the Long Nineteenth Century, with special interest in Postbellum African American Literature, Southern Writers, Reconstruction, the memory and haunting of the slave past, and Southern realism and romanticism.

Currently, she is researching NC-born black writer Jack Thorne, pseudonym of David Bryant Fulton, and his use and subversion of Southern romance in his 1901 novel, Hanover; or the Persecution of the Lowly: A Story of the Wilmington Massacre. 


Awards

  • Lee Green Award, UNC Chapel Hill Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2023
  • Hanes Graduate Fellowship, Wilson Special Collections Library at UNC Chapel Hill, 2023

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Brennan Jones

August 15, 2022

Degrees

2021, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Doctoral student and Teaching Fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill who studies late nineteenth- and twentieth-century American literature.


Beverley Catlett

September 22, 2021

Degrees

2018, MA English, Georgetown University

2016, BA English, Sewanee: The University of the South

Bio

I am a first-year PhD candidate and TA in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill. Prior to entering the program, I earned my MA in English from Georgetown (2018), and my BA in English from Sewanee: The University of the South (2016). From 2017 to 2019, I pursued a long-term archival research project at Yale University, supported by grants from The Cosmos Club Foundation and Georgetown University. My current research interests include 19th century American literature; literature of the sea; ecocriticism; literary theory; and philosophy.


Publications:

  • Catlett, Beverley. “WH Auden’s On This Island: The Phenomenology of Apocalyptic Revelation at the Point of Epiphany.” Interdisciplinary Literary Studies 22.3 (2020): 185-205.
  • Catlett, Beverley. “Madness as Prophecy in Dystopia: Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Nietzsche’s Philosophy, and Heller’s Satire of Wartime Insanity.” Janus Head 16.1 (2018): 173-225.

Awards

  • 2017 Cosmos Scholar Grant Recipient, The Cosmos Club Foundation (Washington, DC)
  • The Andrew Nelson Lytle Prize for Excellence in English and Southern Studies, Sewanee: The University of the South (2016)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Timothy Gress

August 19, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA Philosophy and Religious Studies, Manhattan College

2021, MA English and American Literature, New York University

2021, MLIS Rare Books and Special Collections, Long Island University

Bio

Tim Gress is a PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the department of English & Comparative Literature. His research focuses primarily on the literary and cultural history of Britain during the 19th century, especially as it relates to the history of the book. Other interests include lesser-known woman writers of the late-Romantic and early-Victorian periods, the history and development of the novel in English, descriptive bibliography, and book collecting. Tim also works as a Graduate Assistant in the Rare Book Collection at Wilson Special Collections Library.


Publications:

  • A Collector’s Zeal: Treasures from the DeCoursey Fales Collection at Manhattan College. (Riverdale, New York: Manhattan College, 2020).

Awards

  • William T. Buice III Scholarship, Rare Book School, University of Virginia, 2020
  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Book School, University of Virginia, 2019
  • Edward Branigan Scholars Grant for Research in the Humanities, Manhattan College, 2018

Amy Yue-Yin Chan

August 5, 2021

Degrees

2018, BA Classics, minors French & English, summa cum laude, University of Pennsylvania

Bio

I research 19th and 20th century US poetry and poetics. My dissertation seeks to answer what it means to be an American poet by examining the use of classics in the US tradition. In studying the ways in which classical culture is adapted by US poets, I trace the emergence of ideas of Americanness, as projected against the backdrop of a standardized cultural inheritance.

An earlier version of my dissertation idea, “Du Bois as the American Poet,” won the Graduate Student Conference Paper Award from the Ralph Waldo Emerson Society in 2023.


Publications:

Scholarship:

  • “Review of The Oxford Handbook of Emily Dickinson.” Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin 35.1 (2023), 19-20.

Poems et al.:

  • “On Hudson River.” Bayou (forthcoming).
  • “My Mother Says.” Rattle 83 (2024).
  • Flux. BlazeVOX: Fall 2021, 412-18.
  • Lai-jee.” Indiana Review 43.1 (2021), 85-92.

Teaching Awards

  • Doris Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2023

Awards

External:

  • Graduate Student Conference Paper Award, Ralph Waldo Emerson Society, 2023
  • Dickinson Critical Institute Grant, Emily Dickinson International Society, 2022

Internal:

  • Bain Award (Excellence in Pre-1900 American Lit.), UNC-CH DOECL, 2023
  • Travel Grant, UNC-CH DOECL, 2023
  • Transportation Grant, UNC-CH Graduate School, 2022
  • Travel Award, UNC-CH Graduate & Professional Student Government, 2022
  • Booker Fellowship, UNC-CH DOECL, 2021
  • Inclusive Excellence Top-Up, UNC-CH Graduate School, 2021

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Ryan Carroll

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2020, BA English, George Washington University

Bio

Ryan Carroll is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. He is interested in information systems, documentary storytelling, and truth-telling in 19th-century British, American, and Caribbean narrative. He considers these issues in relation to data overload, aesthetics, and epistemological crisis.

Ryan also writes in public outlets on contemporary literature, translation, sitcoms sidekicks, liberation theology, and more.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • 2022 Ruth Rose Richardson Award for First-Year Achievement
  • 2023 Earl Hartsell Award for Excellence in Teaching

Awards

  • North American Victorian Studies Association Sally Mitchell Prize
  • 2022 Ruth Rose Richardson Award for First-Year Achievement