Colin Dekeersgieter

September 25, 2019
Photo of Colin Deerkesgieter, taken by Emma Duvall

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, University of Vermont

2014, M.A. Modern Literature, CUNY, Graduate Center

2017, M.F.A. Creative Writing, Poetry, New York University

 

Bio

Colin Dekeersgieter is a poet and Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature invested in modern poetry, poetics, and (neuro)aesthetics. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the North American Review, Green Mountains Review, The Worcester Review, and elsewhere.


Awards

  • Goldwater Fellowship, New York University, 2017

Brendan Chambers

September 11, 2019
Photo of Brendan Chambers

Degrees

2019, BA English, Boston College

Bio

Brendan is a PhD student studying 20th century American literature.  His interests lie at the nexus of literature and phenomenology, exploring how writers across genres represent consciousness and perception in their writing.


Publications:

  • “Phenomenological Reproduction in Thompson and Mailer’s New Journalism.” Dianoia. (Spring 2019)

Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Boston College, 2019

Nora Augustine

September 9, 2019

Degrees

2011, B.A. in English Language and Literature (Honors), University of Chicago.

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature with interests across a wide range of academic disciplines. In the past, I have held research and/or teaching positions in literature, composition, women’s and gender studies, LGBTQ+ studies, popular culture, health/medical writing, public policy, developmental psychology, and urban education. My current research tracks the circulation of “Mad Genius” mythology in twentieth-century American culture to now, investigating how popular media—especially auto/biographical writing—has imagined a link between psychiatric disability and exceptional creativity, intelligence, and other gifts or talents. My dissertation, “Extra/Ordinary Minds: Confronting ‘Mad Genius’ Mythology in Contemporary Women’s Memoirs,” draws from feminist critiques of science and medicine to explore the sociocultural factors (i.e., systemic sexism and ableism, but also class privilege and white supremacy) that compel women writers with mental illness to construct romanticized Mad Genius personae in their best-selling memoirs. Through readings of Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted (1993), Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation (1994), and Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind (1995), I argue that women’s autobiographical literature depicts Mad Genius mythology as a deceptively effective, but ultimately unsustainable framework through which to cope with psychic pain.


Publications:

  • “Broken Promise: Depression as Ex-Gifted Girl Identity in Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation.” In The Faces of Depression in Literature, ed. Josefa Ros Velasco (Peter Lang, forthcoming).

Teaching Awards

  • Krista Turner Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018.

Awards

  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, 2019–2020.
  • Summer Research Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019.
  • Travel Award, American Comparative Literature Association, 2019.
  • Blyden Jackson and Roberta Jackson Graduate Fellowship, 2013–2014.

Ian Sawyer

July 29, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Ithaca College

Bio

I am a first-year PhD student in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. My interests include 20th and 21st century American literature, transatlantic modernism, and critical theory.


Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. student in the English and Comparative Literature Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Doug’s dissertation explores the epistemological pre-conditions for forms of play and game in both the post-war military-industrial complex and the post-war avant-garde: paradigms of thought that shaped not only the video game and so-called gamification as we know it today but also contemporary experimental artistic practices. Otherwise, his research concerns twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film, and new media always with an eye to questions of embodiment, mediation, and constructions of the human. He has publications/forthcoming work on the video game’s influence on the novel, neoliberalism’s concomitant relationship with ludic logics, and Octavia Butler’s troubling Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the course will be oriented around video games and other forms of play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Beyond Afrofuturism: A Special Issue of Extrapolation. (Forthcoming 2020)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2020)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Geovani Ramírez

May 23, 2019

Degrees

BA English, University of North Carolina at Wilmington (summa cum laude)

MA British and American Literature, North Carolina State University

Bio

Geovani Ramírez is a Ph.D candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he specializes in Multiethnic and Latinx literature. His dissertation explores the ways Mexican-heritage women writers use the topic of labor in their works to interrogate and re-shape notions of class, race, gender, culture, (trans)national identities, and citizenship.

While at UNC, Geovani has enjoyed working with UNC students in various capacities, including as a graduate research consultant for Latinx and Women’s and Gender Studies literature courses, sole instructor for ENGL 105 Composition and Rhetoric, ENGL 105i Writing in the Social Sciences, and courses in Women’s and Gender Studies and literature. From fall 2014 to spring 2018, Geovani worked as a writing coach at the UNC Writing Center, where he coached undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines on a wide range of writing genres and projects. He has also been an assistant writing coordinator for the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program since the summer of 2018.

Geovani was a graduate student fellow at the UNC Center for Faculty Excellence during the 2018-2019 academic year, and he joined the UNC Latina/o Studies Program as a graduate assistant in the spring of 2019.


Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Center for the Study of the American South Travel Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Lea/McLaurin Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018
  • George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Paul Blom

May 6, 2019

Degrees

2010, MA English, DePaul University

2008, BA English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Originally from LaGrange, GA, Paul is primarily interested in American literature from 1865 to the present and its intersection with medical humanities, especially trauma studies. He is primarily interested in the ethical and political implications of depictions of trauma in literature and other media. In addition to his scholarly work, he also teaches sections of ENGL105, tutors for the athletic department, and currently serves as the Fiction Editor for The Carolina Quarterly. He also writes original pieces of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and drama as well as scripts for promotional videos and short narrative or documentary films.


Publications:


Awards

Recipient of multiple grants for “Popular Narratives and the Experience of War,” UNC-Chapel Hill, from The Graduate School; Humanities for the Public Good; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Fine Arts & Humanities; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Social Sciences & Global Programs; Carolina Veterans Resource Center; Department of English and Comparative Literature; Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense; Department of History; and Center for the Study of the American South, 2019


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Trisha Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Remetir is a doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill writing about transpacific migration, coloniality, and gender.


Awards

  • Travel Award to attend El Mundo Zurdo Conference, 2018 (Initiative for Minority Excellence)
  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship recipient to attend summer intensive program in Filipino, 2018 (Department of U.S. Education)
  • Migration Fellow, Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, 2018 (Duke University)
  • Travel Award to attend UNC-KCL Configurations of Empire conference at King’s College London, 2017 (Institute for Arts and Humanities)
  • SEASSI Scholarship for language study, 2017 (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Future Faculty Fellow, 2017 (UNC)
  • Fulbright Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic, 2012-2013 (U.S. Department of Education)

Erin Piemont

October 30, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

Erin Piemont studies postwar American poetry with special attention to poets of the New York School. Her research interests include lyric theory, the poetics of space, and relationships between postmodern poetry and contemporary critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate teaching fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume