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Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mindy Buchanan-King

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, MA English, College of Charleston

2001, BA Mass Communications, Emory & Henry College

Bio

Mindy Buchanan-King is a first-year Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research is focused on American literature of the late-nineteenth and early twentieth century, particularly the work of female Americanists. Using archival research, she seeks to analyze how such authors as Edith Wharton, Sarah Jewett, Pauline Hopkins, and Willa Cather approached female health and her body—including sexuality, pregnancy, and menstruation—and how their conceptions may have been informed by transatlantic medical narratives. Ms. King is also keen to integrate health humanities perspectives into her work, including an understanding of how the female body is diagnosed and how literary female narratives may foster (or complicate) an empathetic understanding of the female body when administering and receiving health care.


Publications:

  • Buchanan-King, Mindy. “Joan Crawford: Problematizing the (Aging) Female Image and Sexuality in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2019): 1-23.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Megan Swartzfager

August 7, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, University of Mississippi

Bio

Megan Swartzfager is enrolled in the MA program in Literature, Medicine and Culture and serves as a HHIVE Lab RA. She is interested in gendered rhetoric in medicine, the politicization of medical knowledge, and social determinants of health.


Rabab Husain

October 10, 2019

Degrees

2017, B.S. Psychology, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Rabab is a second-year M.A student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. Alongside her psychology degree she minored in English Literature, from which she developed an interest in the interdisciplinary field of medical humanities. Her current research interests involve the intersection of religion, culture, and medicine via the narratives of Muslims and South Asians involved in medical humanitarianism.


Colin Dekeersgieter

September 25, 2019

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, University of Vermont

2014, M.A. Modern Literature, CUNY, Graduate Center

2017, M.F.A. Creative Writing, Poetry, New York University

 

Bio

Colin Dekeersgieter is a poet and Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature invested in modern poetry, poetics, and (neuro)aesthetics. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the North American Review, Green Mountains Review, The Worcester Review, and elsewhere.


Awards

  • Goldwater Fellowship, New York University, 2017

Savannah Bateman

September 16, 2019
Photo of Savannah Bateman

Degrees

BA English, Western Carolina University

Bio

Savannah is an M.A. student at UNC with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She is from the small town of Kitty Hawk, located on the Outer Banks, NC. She earned her B.A. in English Literature and two minors in biology and chemistry from Western Carolina University. As an undergraduate, she was primarily interested in interdisciplinary research in literature, science, and medicine. She has a work history in the Emergency Medical Services and medical transportation services, which primarily drives her research interests in the health humanities, focusing on bibliotherapy techniques in chaotic work environments, trauma theory, and rhetorical analysis of the metaphorical language and personal narratives of EMS providers.


Emily Long

September 9, 2019
Photo of Emily Long

Degrees

2019, B.S. Biology, Second Major in English with Highest Honors, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Emily is a Master’s student in English with a concentration in Literature, Medicine, and Culture. She combines her dual interests in medicine and literature through her work in the medical humanities. Emily’s current research focuses on pre-trauma theory in nineteenth-century American literature.


Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019
Photo of Savannah Foreman

Degrees

MA English (Rhetoric and Digital Humanities), Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Savannah Foreman is a first year PhD student at UNC at Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature department. Her research focuses on theories of communication dealing with emotions, mental illness, and the rhetoric of health and medicine through digital, rhetorical, and neurorhetorical lenses. She hopes to further investigate the ways that emotions are communicated and translated through the body, and how this affects the ways that digital tools are programmed to identify instances of affect.


Publications:

  • 2018, “Edgar Allan Poe and the Detective Character.” Pulse.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nicole Berland

May 23, 2019

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

Although I came to UNC to study later-Victorian monster fiction, my obsessive Star Trek fandom redirected my research interests toward science fiction television seriality. As an educator, I likewise encourage my students to leverage their passions toward their academic work. I have taught several composition courses at UNC, including Writing Across the Disciplines, Writing in the Social Sciences, and Writing in the Humanities, in addition to designing and teaching sections of Literature & Cultural Diversity and Film & Culture. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice, music, and visual art also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2021

Undergraduate Teaching Award (SUTASA), UNC-Chapel Hill, 2020

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015


Awards

Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2021

UNC-King’s College London Global Partnership Grant, 2019

UNC-King’s College London Global Partnership Grant, 2017

Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005