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Madison (Madi) Hester

August 24, 2021

Degrees

2018, B.A. English Literature, Colorado Mesa University

2020, M.A. English, Colorado State University

Bio

I am a Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. I research recent contemporary American literature from 2000 to present, and am absorbed by questions about mixed-race identity, and how multiethnic and multicultural subjects “rightly” identify themselves and are identified. I also examine what makes writing literary, who creates literature, and how digital media challenges and expands those definitions.


Sarah Lofstrom

August 9, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, Mount Holyoke College

Bio

My scholarly interests naturally converge around questions of trauma, ethics, affect, and divergent subjectivities in narratives of resistance and reconciliation. My work is grounded in an intersectional feminist hermeneutic lens to explore the role of gender, sexuality, and settler colonialism in texts by contemporary American multiethnic women writers. I am also interested in speculative imagery and it’s significance in illuminating historically silenced facets of subjectivity. Psychoanalytic criticisms surrounding haunting and trauma, in conjunction with an exploration of queer women’s psyches as sites for potential violence or intimacy are also uniquely compelling to me. My work asks how/why ‘deviant affects’ are labeled as such, and why the burden of silencing those affects largely falls on “marginalized” folks, i.e. queer and trans women of color?


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Lindsay Ragle-Miller

September 22, 2020

Degrees

BA, English with Teacher’s Certification, Minor in Medieval Studies, Eastern Illinois University, 2009

MA, English, Wayne State University, 2020

Bio

I am currently a first-year PhD student at the University of North-Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I teach ENGL 105, the introductory composition course. My research is focused in Medieval Studies, particularly through the lenses of Disability Studies and Queer Studies.


Publications:

Miller, Lindsay, Sarah Chapman and Lynn Losh 2019. Going beyond Lear: Performance and Taming of the Shrew. Dividing the Kingdoms:Interdisciplinary Methods for Teaching King Lear to Undergraduates: Performance: Wayne State University.

Ragle-Miller, Lindsay et. Al. The Warrior Women Project: Wayne State University. https://s.wayne.edu/warriorwomen/

 


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mindy Buchanan-King

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, MA English, College of Charleston

2001, BA Mass Communications, Emory & Henry College

Bio

Mindy Buchanan-King is pursuing her Ph.D. in English Literature at UNC Chapel Hill and is a teaching fellow. Mindy is originally from Virginia and received her B.A. from Emory & Henry College and her M.A. from the College of Charleston. Her master’s thesis focused on Edith Wharton’s use of Romanticism in conceptualizing the artistic self in Hudson River Bracketed. Her graduate research is currently focused on questions of photography and medicine in late 19th-/early 20th-century U.S. literature, artistic conceptualizations and the history of “disfigurement,” and representations and interpretations of World War I les gueules cassées (“men with broken faces”) in wartime medical photography, illustrations, and narratives. She is pursuing the graduate certificate in Literature, Medicine, and Culture.

Mindy is a contributing editor for Iris: The Art and Literary Journal at UNC, is a co-coordinator of the Furst Forum, and is the recipient of a Latina/o Studies Teaching Award. She also volunteers as a transcriber on the original manuscript of Edith Wharton’s Hudson River Bracketed, for The Complete Works of Edith Wharton to be published by Oxford University Press.


Publications:

  • Buchanan-King, Mindy. “Joan Crawford: Problematizing the (Aging) Female Image and Sexuality in What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?Quarterly Review of Film and Video (2019): 1-23.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Colin Dekeersgieter

September 25, 2019

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, University of Vermont

2014, M.A. Modern Literature, CUNY, Graduate Center

2017, M.F.A. Creative Writing, Poetry, New York University

 

Bio

Colin Dekeersgieter is a poet and Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature invested in modern poetry, poetics, and (neuro)aesthetics. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the North American Review, Green Mountains Review, The Worcester Review, and elsewhere.


Awards

  • Goldwater Fellowship, New York University, 2017

Savannah Foreman

July 29, 2019
Photo of Savannah Foreman

Degrees

MA English (Rhetoric and Digital Humanities), Texas A&M University, 2019

BA English, Lamar University, 2017

 

Bio

Savannah Foreman is a third year PhD student at UNC at Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature department. Her research focuses on theories of communication concerning emotions, mental illness, and the rhetoric of health and medicine through digital, rhetorical, and neurorhetorical lenses. She hopes to further investigate the ways that emotions are communicated and translated through the body and how this affects the ways that digital tools are programmed to identify instances of affect.


Publications:

  • 2018, “Edgar Allan Poe and the Detective Character.” Pulse.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nicole Berland

May 23, 2019

Degrees

2005, BA English, Psychology, Plan II Honors, University of Texas

2008, MA Humanities, University of Chicago

Bio

Although I came to UNC to study later-Victorian monster fiction, my obsessive Star Trek fandom redirected my research interests toward science fiction television seriality. As an educator, I likewise encourage my students to leverage their passions toward their academic work. I have taught several composition courses at UNC, including Writing Across the Disciplines, Writing in the Social Sciences, and Writing in the Humanities, in addition to designing and teaching sections of Literature & Cultural Diversity and Film & Culture. I’ve also been afforded the opportunity to TA for Matthew Taylor’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture and Gregory Flaxman’s Film Analysis classes. My auxiliary interests in social justice, music, and visual art also keep me busy with a number of UNC-affiliated and community-based groups and projects.


Teaching Awards

Betts Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2021

Undergraduate Teaching Award (SUTASA), UNC-Chapel Hill, 2020

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015


Awards

Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2021

UNC-King’s College London Global Partnership Grant, 2019

UNC-King’s College London Global Partnership Grant, 2017

Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013-2014

M.A.P.H. Fellowship, University of Chicago, 2007-2008

Phi Beta Kappa, University of Texas, 2005


Paul Blom

May 6, 2019

Degrees

2010, MA English, DePaul University

2008, BA English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Originally from LaGrange, GA, Paul is primarily interested in American literature from 1865 to the present and its intersection with medical humanities, especially trauma studies. He is primarily interested in the ethical and political implications of depictions of trauma in literature and other media. In addition to his scholarly work, he also teaches sections of ENGL105, tutors for the athletic department, and currently serves as the Fiction Editor for The Carolina Quarterly. He also writes original pieces of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and drama as well as scripts for promotional videos and short narrative or documentary films.


Publications:


Awards

  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2021
  • Departmental Summer Fellowship Service Award to provide administrative support at the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab, 2020
  • Departmental Travel Grant Award Recipient for travel to present at annual MELUS Conference in New Orleans, LA, April 2020
  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2020
  • UNC-Chapel Hill Writing Program Professional Development Award Recipient, 2019
  • Recipient of multiple grants for “Popular Narratives and the Experience of War,” UNC-Chapel Hill, from The Graduate School; Humanities for the Public Good; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Fine Arts & Humanities; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Social Sciences & Global Programs; Carolina Veterans Resource Center; Department of English and Comparative Literature; Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense; Department of History; and Center for the Study of the American South, 2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

2015, MA English, The Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies at The University of Alabama

2013, BA English, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature and the history of medicine. Her research interests include patient-caregiver exchanges, performances of care, and the material experiences of illness. She is more broadly interested in early modern approaches to human bodies (“be they alive or dead”) and the senses.

Her most recent presentations explore the role of the physician in Donne’s Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions the relationship between of olfaction and practices of reading in the sixteenth century.

Fowler is also interested in the medical humanities more generally and has a background in health sciences writing from her time as an editor and writer with The University of Alabama’s Institute for Rural Health Research.

She completed her master’s thesis, “They are gone to read upon me:” The Donnean Body-Text, with the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance studies.