Paul Blom

May 6, 2019

Degrees

2010, MA English, DePaul University

2008, BA English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Originally from LaGrange, GA, Paul is primarily interested in American literature from 1865 to the present and its intersection with medical humanities, especially trauma studies. He is primarily interested in the ethical and political implications of depictions of trauma in literature and other media. In addition to his scholarly work, he also teaches sections of ENGL105, tutors for the athletic department, and currently serves as the Fiction Editor for The Carolina Quarterly. He also writes original pieces of fiction, creative non-fiction, poetry, and drama as well as scripts for promotional videos and short narrative or documentary films.


Publications:


Awards

Recipient of multiple grants for “Popular Narratives and the Experience of War,” UNC-Chapel Hill, from The Graduate School; Humanities for the Public Good; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Fine Arts & Humanities; The College of Arts & Sciences, Division of Social Sciences & Global Programs; Carolina Veterans Resource Center; Department of English and Comparative Literature; Curriculum in Peace, War and Defense; Department of History; and Center for the Study of the American South, 2019


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

MA, Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies, The University of Alabama

BA, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature, medicine, and culture. She completed her master’s thesis, “‘They are gone to read upon me’: The Donnean Body-Text”, with the Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies in 2013. After graduating, she worked as an editor and writer for the Institute for Rural Health Research. Her recent work has focused on physician-patient exchanges and early modern treatment of the corpse.


Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie Kinzinger is a third-year PhD student, who focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Ashley Werlinich

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA in English Literature, University of Pittsburgh

Bio

Ashley Werlinich is an English Literature doctoral student and teaching fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is interested in the intersections between 17th century natural philosophy, medicine, and drama—primarily in considering how these intersections can help us understand questions of body and embodiment in early modern literature. In addition to her work as a graduate teaching fellow, Ashley also works as a rare books and special collections instructor with Wilson Library Special Collections.


Publications:

  • David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Katharine Landers, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich, “‘Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance,” Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: emcIMPRINT, forthcoming).

Awards

  • Triangle University Internship Program, Spring 2018

Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a doctoral student in English and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her work lies at the intersection of queer and transgender studies, poststructuralist feminist theorizing, and American culture studies. She is particularly interested in representations of non-normative gendered embodiments and transgressive sexualities in 20th century multiethnic American literature. In May of 2017, Rachel received the Winchester Fellowship from her alma mater to prepare for comprehensive exams and conduct preliminary research for her prospectus. She has also worked in the emerging field of health humanities by helping convene the 2016 Health Humanities Exchange conference at UNC-CH and serving as director of the of Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium for the 2016-2017 academic year.

 


Christina Choon Ling Lee

April 23, 2018

Degrees

MA English, York University

BA English (Honors), University of Alberta

BA Music, University of Alberta

Bio

Christina Lee is a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation, tentatively titled “Towards a Language of Therapoetics” constructs a language of therapeutic recovery from trauma through investigations of the late nineteenth-century writings of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Herman Melville, and Emily Dickinson.


Jennifer Edwell

April 23, 2018

Degrees

BA English, The Ohio State University

MTS Theology and Ethics, The Methodist Theological School in Ohio

Bio

While working on my masters at the Methodist Theological Shool in Ohio, I studied the role of narrative (especially autobiography) in religious ethics. My primary focus was on stories of marginalization; however, I became acutely aware of the theme of finitude in many personal narratives. When I came to UNC, I knew I wanted to explore these themes from a new angle. Rather than focusing on religious narratives, I investigate how people tell stories about health and the role of religion in medicine for patients, providers, and healthcare systems.

At UNC, I have studied the significance of chapels (particularly “interfaith” or psychospiritual spaces) within hospitals. Also, I was the Study Coordinator for the Writing Diabetes Study, and I have written (with my collaborators) about the impact of writing as an intervention for people with chronic illness. Finally, my dissertation investigates the rhetorical history of neonatal medicine in order to reveal the influence of antecedent religious rhetoric on the development of this subfield and to demonstrate the convergence of religion and science in contemporary accounts of premature infants.

I conceive of my research as appealing to three audiences: 1) scholars of rhetoric, 2) scholars of religion, and 3) scholars and practitioners of medicine. Thus, my research falls within the broad scope of the Medical/Health Humanities. Finally, I am exploring an interdisciplinary [or transdisciplinary] approach to rhetorical research that enacts my commitment to feminist, intersectional values.


Publications:

  • Edwell, Jennifer, Singer, Sarah, and Jordynn Jack. “Healing Arts: Rhetorical Techne as Medical (Humanities) Intervention.” Rhetoric of Health and Medicine, special issue of Technical Communication Quarterly. 27(1): 1-14. 2018.
  • Edwell, Jennifer. Medical Interiors: Materiality and Spatiality in Medical Rhetoric.” Methodologies in Rhetoric of Health and Medicine, edited by Lisa Meloncon and Blake Scott. (New York: Routledge, 2018).
  • Singer, Sarah, Weed, Kym, Edwell, Jennifer, Jack, Jordynn, and Jane Thrailkill. “Advancing Pre-Health Humanities as Intensive Research Practice: Principles and Recommendations from a Cross-Disciplinary Baccalaureate Setting.” Journal of Medical Humanities, special issue on “Pre-Health Humanities Education.” First online June 2017.
  • Edwell, Jennifer, and Jordynn Jack. “Gestational Diabetes Testing, Narrative, and Medical Distrust.” Bioethical Inquiry, symposium on “Public Trust in Expert Knowledge” edited by Silvia Camporesi, Mark Davis, and Maria Vaccarella. December 2016.

Mark Collins

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2011, B.A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

2012, M.A. History, Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Mark Collins is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in the fields of contemporary American and multi-ethnic literature and women’s and gender studies. His academic interests include: feminist theory, science and technology studies, critical race theory, and cultural studies. Mark is currently working on his dissertation project, called “Nuclear Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Reproductive Control in US Cold War Speculative Fiction,” which explores the relationship between the discourses of nuclear warfare and reproduction in literary and cultural texts from the decades spanning the Cold War period.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sarah Anne Kuczynski

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English (Honors), The George Washington University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English who specializes in nineteenth-century American literature and poetry and poetics. I am currently completing a dissertation entitled “American Contentment (and Its Discontents),” which stages a claim for the recuperation of contentment within literary studies through an engagement with American literature from the late nineteenth and early twentieth century.

 

At UNC, I have taught introductory composition courses and TA’d for Professor Thrailkill’s Literature, Medicine, and Culture course.


Publications:

• “ ‘There Is No Miracle More Cruel Than This’: Read, Relaxation, and Maternal Agency   in Plath’s Three Women” (Literature and Medicine 36.1: 2018)


Teaching Awards

• Hartsell Award for excellence in teaching first year composition, 2015


Awards

  • Mellon Graduate Five-Year Fellowship, 2013—2018
  • Robert Bain Award for outstanding achievement in nineteenth-century American literature, 2015
  • Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2018-2019

Curriculum Vitae / Resume