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Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena is a PhD student, graduate research assistant with the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab, and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Additionally, Meleena is earning a certificate in Women and Gender Studies. Their research focuses on contemporary LatinX literature, queer theory, and the environmental humanities with special attention to rhetorics of advocacy. Meleena is a rare plant hobbyist, stray animal collector, and celebrator of quirks and kinks. Their aim is to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.


Jonathan Albrite

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2008, BA English, James Madison University

2020, MA English, James Madison University

Bio

Broadly interested in posthumanism, ecocriticism, and affect theory, John’s research explores how nonhuman agents have shaped the literature and film of America’s long twentieth century. At the same time, he studies the productive tension between posthumanism’s push to consider nonhuman lives and the ongoing work of critical race, gender, and disability scholars, who advocate for the human lives ignored by systems of power.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Ariannah Kubli

September 15, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, Georgia State University

Bio

Ariannah Kubli is a first-year PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill, where she specializes in nineteenth- and early twentieth-century American literature. Her current scholarly interests include American literary realism and naturalism; literature and philosophy; intellectual history; and American war narratives. She’s especially interested in examining the philosophical ramifications of warfare as evidenced in the fiction of American realist and naturalist writers. More generally, Ariannah hopes that by exploring the philosophical substructures of texts, she can contribute to our understanding of the texts themselves and the historical moments from which they derive.


Awards

  • James E. Routh Outstanding English Major Award, Georgia State University, 2020

Adhy Kim

September 1, 2020

Degrees

B.A. Lawrence University

Bio

Adhy Kim is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. His research areas include speculative literature, colonialism and post-colonialism in Japan and Korea, race, and American Cold War empire. His dissertation examines literary intersections between Cold War memory and speculative natural histories.


Publications:

“Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan- Wook’s The Handmaiden,” The Journal of Global and Postcolonial Studies 7:2, special issue on postcolonial nostalgia, eds. Simon Lewis and Giusi Russo (2019)

“Japanese Melancholy and the Ethics of Concealment in Ruth Ozeki’s A Tale for the Time Being,” Mosaic: An Interdisciplinary Critical Journal 52:4 (Dec. 2019)


Megan Swartzfager

August 7, 2020

Degrees

2020, BA English, University of Mississippi

Bio

Megan Swartzfager is enrolled in the MA program in Literature, Medicine and Culture and serves as a HHIVE Lab RA. She is interested in gendered rhetoric in medicine, the politicization of medical knowledge, and social determinants of health.


Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten is a PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which she finds exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, she enjoys nurturing all forms of human and other life through her passion for plants and pets.


Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)

Eddie A. Moore

October 21, 2019
Photo of Eddie Moore, taken by Sarah Boyd

Degrees

2008, BA English, North Carolina Central University

2011, MA English, North Carolina Central University

Bio

Eddie Moore is a passionate researcher and activist-teacher whose goals beyond teaching English curriculum include empowering students to think critically about the world they inhabit and the ways in which they might be actively in shaping it for greater diversity and inclusion.

Mr. Moore’s research interest include 20th Century African American Literature, Critical Theory and Cultural Studies (with specific emphasis on Masculinity Studies), Critical Race Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Medical Humanities. Primarily, his work is an interdisciplinary exploration of the utility of fictional representations of wellness outcomes among marginalized groups such as black queer men. Mr. Moore devotes a significant amount of his study to the work of James Baldwin, Samuel Delany, and other writers of black queer fiction. A crucial aim of his studies is to reclaim African American fiction from marginal positions among literary canons, as important theoretic and philosophical articulations of black and black queer experiences. These texts argue the connectedness of group body politics to politics of the national body.


Teaching Awards

2019 Innaugural J. Lee Greene Award for Outstanding Research in Race & Ethnicity

2017-2018 Erica Lindenmann Award for Teaching in Composition


Awards

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship finalist


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. candidate in the English Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His writing and teaching percolates through twentieth- and twenty-first-century philosophy, cultural theory, literature, film, art and new media – specializing in the history and theory of games. Doug’s dissertation – Askēsis Machines: Gaming, Training, and Habit in Digital Cultures – explores how digitally mediated exercise constitutes a primary means whereby perception, thought, movement and, ultimately, life has taken shape since, roughly, the mid-Twentieth Century. Taking games – including video games – as objects, the dissertation focuses on the repeated practice of play as a mode of cultivating the capacities, rhythms and habits of humans and non-humans in military, institutional, commercial, and artistic contexts. Doug has forthcoming and published work concerning media philosophy, futurity, self-cultivation, and games in Playing the Field (2019), Extrapolation (2020), Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds (2020), In Media Res (2020), Post-45 (2020), Encyclopedia of Video Games (est. 2021), Eludamos (est. 2021), and Que Parle (est. 2021).


Publications:

  • Stark, Doug. “Training for the Military? Some Historical Considerations Towards a Media Philosophical Computer Game Philosophy.” Eludamos. (Forthcoming est. 2021.)
  • Stark, Doug and Teresa O’ Rourke. “The Lost Futures of BoJack and Diane.” Post45, special cluster on Leaving Hollywoo: Essays After BoJack Horseman, 2020, https://post45.org/2020/11/the-lost-futures-of-bojack-and-diane/
  • Stark, Doug. “Reimagining Play with Lewis Carroll’s Croquet.” In Media Res, March 2020, http://mediacommons.org/imr/content/reimagining-play-lewis-carroll%E2%80%99s-croquet
  • Stark, Doug. “Unsettling Embodied Literacy in QWOP the Walking Simulator.” Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 49–67.
  • Stark, Doug. “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series,” Extrapolation, vol. 61, no. 1-2, 2020, pp. 151–171.
  • Stark, Doug. “Video Game Novels.” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2021)
  • Stark, Doug. “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and 2020 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality.

My research is published or forthcoming in American Literature, Configurations, and Mississippi Quarterly. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 128: Major American Authors, ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • “‘Multiplied without Number’: Lynching, Statistics, and Visualization in Ida B. Wells, Mark Twain, and WEB Du Bois” American Literature 92.3 (Spring 2021): forthcoming
  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2020-2021
  • Quarry Farm Short-Term Fellowship, Center for Mark Twain Studies, 2020
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, UNC Public Humanities 2019-2020
  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019
  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016


Curriculum Vitae / Resume