Eddie A. Moore

October 21, 2019
Photo of Eddie Moore, taken by Sarah Boyd

Degrees

2008, BA English, North Carolina Central University

2011, MA English, North Carolina Central University

Bio

Eddie Moore is a passionate researcher and activist-teacher whose goals beyond teaching English curriculum include empowering students to think critically about the world they inhabit and the ways in which they might be actively in shaping it for greater diversity and inclusion.

Mr. Moore’s research interest include 20th Century African American Literature, Critical Theory and Cultural Studies (with specific emphasis on Masculinity Studies), Critical Race Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies, and Medical Humanities. Primarily, his work is an interdisciplinary exploration of the utility of fictional representations of wellness outcomes among marginalized groups such as black queer men. Mr. Moore devotes a significant amount of his study to the work of James Baldwin, Samuel Delany, and other writers of black queer fiction. A crucial aim of his studies is to reclaim African American fiction from marginal positions among literary canons, as important theoretic and philosophical articulations of black and black queer experiences. These texts argue the connectedness of group body politics to politics of the national body.


Teaching Awards

2019 Innaugural J. Lee Greene Award for Outstanding Research in Race & Ethnicity

2017-2018 Erica Lindenmann Award for Teaching in Composition


Awards

2018 Ford Foundation Fellowship finalist


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


Nora Augustine

September 9, 2019

Degrees

2011, B.A. in English Language and Literature (Honors), University of Chicago.

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature with interests across a wide range of academic disciplines. In the past, I have held research and/or teaching positions in literature, composition, women’s and gender studies, LGBTQ+ studies, popular culture, health/medical writing, public policy, developmental psychology, and urban education. My current research tracks the circulation of “Mad Genius” mythology in twentieth-century American culture to now, investigating how popular media—especially auto/biographical writing—has imagined a link between psychiatric disability and exceptional creativity, intelligence, and other gifts or talents. My dissertation, “Extra/Ordinary Minds: Confronting ‘Mad Genius’ Mythology in Contemporary Women’s Memoirs,” draws from feminist critiques of science and medicine to explore the sociocultural factors (i.e., systemic sexism and ableism, but also class privilege and white supremacy) that compel women writers with mental illness to construct romanticized Mad Genius personae in their best-selling memoirs. Through readings of Susanna Kaysen’s Girl, Interrupted (1993), Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation (1994), and Kay Redfield Jamison’s An Unquiet Mind (1995), I argue that women’s autobiographical literature depicts Mad Genius mythology as a deceptively effective, but ultimately unsustainable framework through which to cope with psychic pain.


Publications:

  • “Broken Promise: Depression as Ex-Gifted Girl Identity in Elizabeth Wurtzel’s Prozac Nation.” In The Faces of Depression in Literature, ed. Josefa Ros Velasco (Peter Lang, forthcoming).

Teaching Awards

  • Krista Turner Memorial Award for Teaching Excellence, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019.
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018.

Awards

  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, 2019–2020.
  • Summer Research Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019.
  • Travel Award, American Comparative Literature Association, 2019.
  • Blyden Jackson and Roberta Jackson Graduate Fellowship, 2013–2014.

Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. student in the English and Comparative Literature Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Doug’s dissertation explores the epistemological pre-conditions for forms of play and game in both the post-war military-industrial complex and the post-war avant-garde: paradigms of thought that shaped not only the video game and so-called gamification as we know it today but also contemporary experimental artistic practices. Otherwise, his research concerns twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film, and new media always with an eye to questions of embodiment, mediation, and constructions of the human. He has publications/forthcoming work on the video game’s influence on the novel, neoliberalism’s concomitant relationship with ludic logics, and Octavia Butler’s troubling Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the course will be oriented around video games and other forms of play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Beyond Afrofuturism: A Special Issue of Extrapolation. (Forthcoming 2020)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2020)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Don Holmes

March 11, 2019
Photo of Don Holmes

Degrees

2014, BA English (Magna Cum Luade), University of Southern Mississippi

Bio

Don Holmes is a 5th year PhD student in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests are in early African American literature, specifically the 18thand early 19thcenturies. His dissertation explores early black writers of their methods in critiquing and subverting systems of racial geographies (institutions of white supremacy). At Carolina, Don has taught English composition and currently teaches English 128: Major American Authors with a focus on lesser-known American women authors, including Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, and Grace Paley. Don has taught English composition at North Carolina Central University and will return there this summer.


Publications:

  • Holmes, Don. “a clever fellow”: The Subversive Trickster in The Narrative of Lunsford Lane (forthcoming in North Carolina Literary Review)
  • Holmes, Don and Ryan Luethje. A “charitable institution”: University of North Carolina in the Era of the Civil War” in “Persistence through Peril: Episodes of College Life and Academic Enduring in the Civil War South” (forthcoming, book chapter)
  • Holmes, Don. “Silent Sam: Geographic Marker of Violence, Politics, and the Racialized.” Lift Institute, https://www.liftinstitute.org/news/

Book Reviews:


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Remetir is a doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill writing about transpacific migration, coloniality, and gender.


Awards

  • Travel Award to attend El Mundo Zurdo Conference, 2018 (Initiative for Minority Excellence)
  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship recipient to attend summer intensive program in Filipino, 2018 (Department of U.S. Education)
  • Migration Fellow, Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, 2018 (Duke University)
  • Travel Award to attend UNC-KCL Configurations of Empire conference at King’s College London, 2017 (Institute for Arts and Humanities)
  • SEASSI Scholarship for language study, 2017 (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Future Faculty Fellow, 2017 (UNC)
  • Fulbright Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic, 2012-2013 (U.S. Department of Education)

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Travis Townley Alexander

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English and Plan II Honors, The University of Texas at Austin

Bio

Travis is broadly invested in postwar American fiction, film, and visual art. His research specifically clusters around portrayals of the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the 1980s to the present in literary, filmic, and theoretical domains. Travis is particularly interested in the extent to which scripts governing racial representation inform these portrayals.


Publications:

  • “Immunity’s Racial Empire: Virality, Melancholy, Whiteness,” American Literature (revised and resubmitted)
  • “Speaking Fees: Capital, Colony, and Reference in China Mieville’s Embassytown.” LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory1 (forthcoming 2020)
  • “‘A hint of industrial espionage in the eye’: Orientalism, Essayism, and the Politics of Memory in Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video1 (2019): 42 – 61.
  • “Long Live the Old Flesh: AIDS and the Americans with Disabilities Act at Quarter Century.” symplokē1-2 (December 2018): 251 – 266.
  • “Deregulating Grief: A Review of Dagmawi Woubshet’s The Calendar of Loss: Race, Sexuality and Mourning in the Early Era of AIDS,” boundary 2, 2016

Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, Spring 2017


Awards

Short Term Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2019

Summer Research Grant, Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Graduate Student Research Award, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Dean’s Distinguished Graduate, College of Liberal Arts (12 students chosen from 2,983 graduates), The University of Texas at Austin, 2013