Summer School Coordinator:

Mike Gutierrez – mgutie@email.unc.edu


Summer 2019 Courses

Maymester

ENGL 121            L. LANGBAUER                M-F       9:00-12:15

British Literature, 19th and Early 20th Century

Seminar focusing on later British literature. Students learn methods of literary study and writing about literature.


 

Summer 1

 

ENGL 123            H. ROSS                          ONLINE COURSE WITH THE FRIDAY CENTER

Introduction to Fiction

Per Arts & Sciences policy, first-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses in the summer prior to matriculation.

Novels and shorter fiction by Defoe, Austen, Dickens, Faulkner, Wolfe, Fitzgerald, Joyce, and others.


ENGL 125            H. VEGGIAN                    ONLINE COURSE WITH THE FRIDAY CENTER

Introduction to Poetry

Per Arts & Sciences policy, first-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses in the summer prior to matriculation.

A course designed to develop basic skills in reading poems from all periods of English and American literature.


ENGL 130            A. LAWSON                       M-F       9:45-11:15

Introduction to Fiction Writing

A course in reading and writing fiction. Close study of a wide range of short stories; emphasis on technical problems. Class criticism and discussion of student exercises and stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 130 and ENGL 132H.


ENGL 131            R. WHITE                           M-F       11:30-1:00

Introduction to Poetry Writing

A course in reading and writing poems. Close study of a wide range of published poetry and of poetic terms and techniques. Composition, discussion, and revision of original student poems. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 131 and ENGL 133H.


ENGL 140            W. WEBER                         ONLINE

Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature

This course is cross-listed with WMST 140.

Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.


ENGL 143            J. LARSON                        ONLINE

Film and Culture

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.


ENGL 146            D. ROSS                             ONLINE

Science Fiction/Fantasy/Utopia

Readings in and theories of science fiction, utopian and dystopian literatures, and fantasy fiction.


 

ENGL 340            M. ROBINSON                   M/T/TR       3:15-5:50 AND ONLINE

Studies in Jane Austen

This course explores the history, social critique, and the political background of three of Austen’s novels. It covers some adaptation theory and at least two major Austen adaptations. Students will choose a Pride and Prejudice adaptation early in the course, write a conference proposal about it, and make a conference poster to present at the four-day Jane Austen Summer Program (JASP) that they will attend as part of the course. JASP includes talks by authors of major adaptations, context corners with short but detailed overviews of subjects that have ranged in the past from the history of pugs in England to an analysis of the Gothic, and small discussion groups to consider these weighty topics. Including dance lessons, a regency ball, and an amateur theatrical, JASP is an event that brings together everyday people—teachers, doctors, lawyers—and professors. Information about registering for the conference can be found at www.JaneAustenSummer.org


Summer 2

 

ENGL 100            See ConnectCarolina for more details.

Basic Writing


ENGL 105            See ConnectCarolina for more details.

English Comp and Rhetoric

This college-level course focuses on written and oral argumentation, composition, research, information literacy, and rhetorical analysis. The course introduces students to the specific disciplinary contexts for written work and oral presentations required in college courses. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 102 and ENGL 102I, 105, or 105I. Course utilizes computers.


ENGL 120            R. BARBOUR                       M-F       11:30-1:00

British Literature, Medieval to 18th Century

Survey of medieval, Renaissance, and neoclassical periods. Drama, poetry, and prose.


ENGL 121            E. GUALTIERI-REED          ONLINE COURSE WITH THE FRIDAY CENTER

British Literature, 19th and Early 20th Century

Per Arts & Sciences policy, first-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses in the summer prior to matriculation.

Seminar focusing on later British literature. Students learn methods of literary study and writing about literature.


ENGL 123            S. PALMER                            M-F       9:45-11:15

Introduction to Fiction

In English 123, we will look at how fiction is both crafted and understood with focus on the thematic of addiction. While writers are notorious for the more traditional means of substance abuse (drinking, drugs, drinking) addiction can also take behavioral forms such as power, sex and work. These psychological cravings and compulsions make for a compelling introduction into short stories and novels. In English 123, we’ll read the likes of James Baldwin, Leslie Marmon Silko, Dennis Johnson and Mary Gaitskill.  You’ll be responsible for some short writing assignments, in-class quizzes, two papers, and a final. My hope is that you’ll walk away with the tools to interpret literary fiction, while also gaining an understanding of how writers build stories from the ground up.


ENGL 128            P. HORN                                  M-F       1:15-2:45

Major American Authors

A study of approximately six major American authors drawn from Emerson, Thoreau, Hawthorne, Melville, Stowe, Whitman, Clemens, Dickinson, Chesnutt, James, Eliot, Stein, Hemingway, O’Neill, Faulkner, Hurston, or others.


ENGL 129            M. COHEN                             ONLINE

Literature and Cultural Diversity

Studies in African American, Asian American, Hispanic American, Native American, Anglo-Indian, Caribbean, gay-lesbian, and other literatures written in English.


ENGL 130            R. KRAWIEC                         ONLINE COURSE WITH THE FRIDAY CENTER

Introduction to Fiction Writing

Does not count towards Creative Writing Minor

Per Arts & Sciences policy, first-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses in the summer prior to matriculation.

A course in reading and writing fiction. Close study of a wide range of short stories; emphasis on technical problems. Class criticism and discussion of student exercises and stories. Students may not receive credit for both ENGL 130 and ENGL 132H.


ENGL 140            W. WEBER                             ONLINE

Introduction to Gay and Lesbian Culture and Literature

This course is cross-listed with WMST 140.

Introduces students to concepts in queer theory and recent sexuality studies. Topics include queer lit, AIDS, race and sexuality, representations of gays and lesbians in the media, political activism/literature.


ENGL 143            J. LARSON                        ONLINE

Film and Culture

Examines the ways culture shapes and is shaped by film. This course uses comparative methods to contrast films as historic or contemporary, mainstream or cutting-edge, in English or a foreign language, etc.


ENGL 144            S. BOYD                                   M-F       11:30-1:00

Popular Genres

From Hunger Games to Handmaid’s Tales: Dystopian Fictions & Futures

Dystopian fiction often imagines bleak, post-apocalyptic futures that are controlled by totalitarian regimes, subjugated by technology run amok, devastated by environmental disaster, or blighted by plague and all manner of contagion. As negative as these imagined worlds might be, however, they nevertheless manage to do productive, even positive, cultural work in our own. By focusing on and exaggerating contemporary problems (by making a space for them) dystopian fiction has the potential to open new frontiers in the real world. Our emphasis throughout this class will be how this potential manifests in a variety of literary texts and cultural objects including dystopian classics like Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” and George Orwell’s 1984, and more recent blockbusters like Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, and Suzanne Collins’s The Hunger Games.


ENGL 148            G. RODRIGUEZ                         M-TR       3:00-5:00

Horror

This course will explore how the visceral interplay between terror and horror lies at the heart of a genre that confronts its readers with the darker side of human nature. Primarily, we will focus on horror fiction that revolves around haunted spaces, from its origins in the Gothic novel to the contemporary work of Stephen King. Readings will include The Haunting of Hill House, Hell House, and excerpts from Mark Z. Danielewski’s House of Leaves. To enrich our discussion of the literature, we will also discuss horror films such as Alfred Hitchcock’s Rebecca, Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining, Halloween (and its 2018 sequel), episodes from the Netflix series The Haunting of Hill House, Suspiria (and its 2018 remake) and Hereditary.


ENGL 155            E. CRYSTALL                             ONLINE

Horror

This course examines a number of visual texts, including graphic novels and emerging narrative forms that include visuals as well as words. The course explores how meaning can be conveyed through the composition, juxtaposition, and framing of images as well as through the relationship between words and images.


ENGL 345            M. COHEN                                  ONLINE COURSE WITH THE FRIDAY CENTER

American Literature, 1900-2000

Per Arts & Sciences policy, first-semester, first-year students may not enroll in for-credit online courses in the summer prior to matriculation.

Instructors choose authors or topics from the period 1900 to 2000. The course may be organized chronologically or thematically but is not intended as a survey.