David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Bailey Fernandez

July 29, 2019

Degrees

2019, BA English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a writer and scholar who works deeply with the poetics of British Romanticism (especially William Blake) and widely with literature’s intersection with philosophy, theology, and linguistics. He is also deeply interested with the history of the avant-garde up until the present day , which he believes begins in the Romantic period.


Awards

  • DLC Research Fellowship, UNC, 2019-20.
  • Digital Humanities Launch Program, UNC, 2019-20.

Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

Bio

Doug Stark is a PhD student in the English program at UNC, Chapel Hill. His research appraises the role of play and experimentation across literature, film, video games, and new media. Drawing on his background in game studies, Germanophone media theory, and continental philosophy, Doug’s thinking concerns the conditions of possibilities for forms of play transhistorically and transculturally. He asks: what are the epistemic, cultural, and technical preconditions for the emergence of forms of play? For example, why do we have computer game play as we know it today? Why the ostentatious play of baroque wigs in the late eighteenth century? Across time and space, Doug contends, we can see a complex enmeshment of cultural values, forms of knowledge, and technical development refracted through the medium of play. Currently focusing on post-war aleatory aesthetics, Doug is particularly interested in forms of play that seem to operate in excess of epistemic paradigms of thought.

Doug also has forthcoming work on video game literature and Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the content of the course will engage in some way with games and play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Extrapolation. (Forthcoming)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, Second Edition, edited by Mark J. P. Wolf. (Forthcoming)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Karah Marie Mitchell

February 4, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I focus on nineteenth-century American poetry with special attention to critical animal studies, transatlantic language theories, historical poetics, Native American poetry, and the history of science.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a graduate teaching fellow in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on the compositional junctures between experimental contemporary American poetry and visual art and how they shape rhetorical uses of form and material, both physical and digital.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jacob T. Watson

October 15, 2018

Degrees

PhD, English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Defending 2018

M.A. English, University of Georgia at Athens, 2011

B.A. English, Philosophy Minor, University of Georgia at Athens, 2009

magna cum laude

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate specializing in critical theory, film and media. I’m currently thinking about the discourses surrounding audiovisual technology in the mid-twentieth century as they pertain to the history and prehistory of American broadcast television. My other interests include graphics, speculative fiction after World War II, image theory, information theory, and screen archeology. I have taught courses on contemporary literature, digital literature, film and visual culture. I’m also an avid hiker and obsessive music lover.


Publications:

“The Suffusion of the Televisual in The Crying of Lot 49.” Style 51.2 (2017).


Teaching Awards

  • 2017-18           UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Distinguished Teaching Fellowship
  • 2015                UNC-CH English and Comparative Literature Senior Teaching Fellowship

Awards

  • 2016-17           UNC Graduate School Dissertation Completion Fellowship
  • 2016                The Eliason Dissertation Fellowship
  • 2015                The Carol and Edward Smithwick Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2015                The John R. Bittner Award for Outstanding Dissertation in Literature and Media

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Articles

  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading,” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (forthcoming)
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 47: Issue 3, 317-332, 2018.
  • “Reformatted / Re-fleshed: Gender, the Internet and New Configurations for Embodiment.” Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism: Vol. 7: No. 1, 2014.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Ruth Richardson Award for Outstanding Academic Performance in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2018

Anna Carson Levett

April 24, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA French and English (with emphasis in Creative Writing), University of Pennsylvania

Bio

Anna Levett is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature. Specializing in twentieth century French/Francophone and Arabic literature, her work primarily focuses on Mediterranean studies and global modernism, with a secondary focus on film studies. Her dissertation, Mediterranean Dream-Places: The Past and Future of Surrealism in Late 20th century Arab Literature, concerns the reception of French surrealism in the Arab world. From 2015-2016, she was a fellow at the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (CASA) in Cairo, Egypt. In Fall 2018 she will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She has published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.


Publications:

  • “‘Shouldn’t Love Be the One True Thing?’ Godard and the Legacy of Surrealist Ethics,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 34.8 (Summer 2017).


Awards

  • Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France (Fall 2018)
  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC Graduate School (2016-2017)
  • Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) Fellowship, American University in Cairo (2015-2016)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (2012-2013)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, Qasid Institute, Amman, Jordan (Summer 2012)
  • FLAS – Beginning Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (Summer 2011)
  • Best Graduate Essay in Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2010-2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013