Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

MA, Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies, The University of Alabama

BA, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature, medicine, and culture. She completed her master’s thesis, “‘They are gone to read upon me’: The Donnean Body-Text”, with the Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies in 2013. After graduating, she worked as an editor and writer for the Institute for Rural Health Research. Her recent work has focused on physician-patient exchanges and early modern treatment of the corpse.


Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Writing Program Professional Development Award, Fall 2018 & Spring 2019

Awards

  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, MEMS UNC, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature. His research focuses on exchanges among drama, philosophy, politics, and theology in pre- and post-reformation Europe. He is particularly interested in the ways reformation theology modified English theatrical tradition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

Nikki Roulo’s research focuses primarily upon early modern literature. In particular, she is interested in the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, who bridges both genres, and ballads and music within early modern texts.


Publications:

  • “Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. 206 pp. $104.95 ISBN: 9781472458322.” In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018).
  • “Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. 385 pp. $40.00 ISBN: 9780226415970.” In Journal of Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018).

Awards

  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology

Erik Maloney

July 27, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA in English and Comparative Literature, summa cum laude, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

My research focuses on exchanges among literature, science, philosophy, and theology in early modern Europe.


Awards

  • 2016-17, North Carolina Native American Incentive Grant
  • 2016-17, Ruth Rose Richardson award for the outstanding record in the first year of graduate study