Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. student in the English and Comparative Literature Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. Doug’s dissertation explores the epistemological pre-conditions for forms of play and game in both the post-war military-industrial complex and the post-war avant-garde: paradigms of thought that shaped not only the video game and so-called gamification as we know it today but also contemporary experimental artistic practices. Otherwise, his research concerns twentieth and twenty-first century literature, film, and new media always with an eye to questions of embodiment, mediation, and constructions of the human. He has publications/forthcoming work on the video game’s influence on the novel, neoliberalism’s concomitant relationship with ludic logics, and Octavia Butler’s troubling Afrofuturism.

Prospective ENGL 105 students should know that the course will be oriented around video games and other forms of play.


Publications:

  • “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series.” Beyond Afrofuturism: A Special Issue of Extrapolation. (Forthcoming 2020)
  • “Video Game Novels” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2020)
  • “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Moira Marquis

April 2, 2019

Degrees

M.L.A.             Humanities, University of North Carolina Asheville, 2010

B.A.                  History, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, 2006

Bio

Moira Marquis is an eco-critical decolonialist studying contemporary Anglophone novels. Her dissertation, The Dialectic of Myth: Creating Meaning in the Anthropocene, examines how contemporary Anglophone novelists are using traditional myths to tell stories about ecological destruction and climate change which offer alternatives to techno-fix futures or the apocalypse. She is also interested in the Irish language and other minor languages abilities to foster ecological understanding. Her interests are in decolonialism, eco-criticism and environmental humanities, eco-linguistics and myth.


Teaching Awards

2017  Senior Teaching Fellowship, Department of English, UNCCH

2016  Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNCCH

2015  Future Faculty Fellowship, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNCCH

2015  Professional Development Award, English Department, UNCCH

2014  Presidential Scholars Program Distinguished Teacher Award

2013-2017 UNC Chapel Hill Teaching Fellowship


Karah M. Mitchell

February 4, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I focus on pre-1900 American literature and have a special interest in historical poetics, histories of natural science, critical animal studies, Native American literature, and transatlantic Romanticism.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer (forthcoming), roundtable article from MLA 2019

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Christine Johns

November 13, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.A. Critical and Cultural Theory, Cardiff University

2013, B.A. English, University of Central Florida

Bio

Christine is a doctoral student who studies critical theory, environmental literature, and science fiction. Her current research interests include literary and visual expressions of posthumanism, political theory, questions of community, and theories of space and/or place.


Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica is a PhD student in Comparative Literature and teaching assistant in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. She focuses on 19th and 20th century Russian and Eastern European literature. Her MA thesis (2013)  explored the role of death in Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Her current research interests include animal studies, atrocity, utopias/dystopias, revolutions, and the concept of death.

 

 


Awards

  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the recipient of a Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship for 2019-2020. Dwight works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on Ethnic Literatures and Critical Race Theory. His current research focuses on minoritarian identity and conceptions/rhetorics of change in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, speculative fiction, environmental humanism, and drama and performance theory.


Publications:

  • Refereed Journal Article
    • 2019  “‘She Forgot’: Obscuring White Privilege and Colorblindness in Harper Lee’s Novels” South Atlantic Review. 84.1 (March 2019): 54-71.
  • Book Review
    •  2020  Review of Beth Lew Williams. The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America. Harvard University Press,  2018. In Journal of Asian American Studies (2020). Forthcoming February 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)

Awards

  • 2019-20  Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
  • 2019   Graduate Tuition Incentive Scholarship, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019  Graduate Student International Travel Grant, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Kenan Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Summer Dissertation Research Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2018  Baxter Grant, American Studies Association
  • 2018  CSA Travel Grant, Center for the Study of the American South, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017  Institute for the Arts and Humanities Collaboration Grant, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
  • 2015  Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2013  Booker Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature