Skip to main content

Charlie Lee

September 23, 2021

Degrees

BA English, Andrews University

MA English, University of Oklahoma

 

Bio

I am currently interested in video game studies, digital rhetoric, and digitial composition pedagogy. My previous work looked at the horror video game Amnesia: The Dark Descent and its uses of virtual spaces to generate affects of fear and anxiety. Currently, I’m interested in studying competitive e-sports titles such as League of Legends and Starcraft II to understand how their fast-paced forms of gameplay require and generate new forms of literacies.


Publications:

Lee, Charles (2021), ‘Running scared: Fear and Space in Amnesia: The Dark
Descent’, Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, 13:1, pp. 93–112.


Sarah Lofstrom

August 9, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, Mount Holyoke College

Bio

My scholarly interests naturally converge around questions of trauma, ethics, affect, and divergent subjectivities in narratives of resistance and reconciliation. My work is grounded in an intersectional feminist hermeneutic lens to explore the role of gender, sexuality, and settler colonialism in texts by contemporary American multiethnic women writers. I am also interested in speculative imagery and it’s significance in illuminating historically silenced facets of subjectivity. Psychoanalytic criticisms surrounding haunting and trauma, in conjunction with an exploration of queer women’s psyches as sites for potential violence or intimacy are also uniquely compelling to me. My work asks how/why ‘deviant affects’ are labeled as such, and why the burden of silencing those affects largely falls on “marginalized” folks, i.e. queer and trans women of color?


Meleena Gil

July 12, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English Literature, University of Central Florida

Bio

Meleena (they/she) is a disruptor, PhD student, and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature also earning a graduate certificate in Women’s and Gender Studies. Meleena is the administrative research assistant for the Sexuality Studies Program and the co-director of Social Media in the Digital Literacy and Communications Lab. Additionally, Meleena was a recent recipient of the Fall 2021 Latina/o Studies Program teaching affiliate fellowship. Meleena’s research focuses on contemporary LatinX literature, queer theory and sexuality studies, and the environmental humanities. They are interested in botanical epistemologies, multispecies worldbuilding, and the impact of environmental degradation on at-risk communities, debility, and rhetorics of advocacy. Also within their scope is the evaluation of sadomasochistic paradigms in the construction and understanding of the sociopolitical subject. Meleena describes their apparently disparate interests as being the connective tissue of their larger project: healing; however, and wherever it can be created. Outside of academia, Meleena is a nature enthusiast, a friend of strays, and a celebrator of quirks and kinks. They aim to create a space for meaningful experiences and mutual acknowledgment.


Teaching Awards

Fall 2021 Latina/o Studies Graduate Teaching Affiliate Fellowship


Anthony DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

Bio

Tony DiNardo is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Their main area of research deals with the value positionings of, and the cultural work performed by, the fantastic from the medieval romance to modern genre fantasy and science fiction. They have also done more conventional work in medieval and early modern theological and devotional thought from Wyclif to Donne. Other interests of theirs include Stuart historiography, faith and labor in the Victorian social novel, the poetry of the Irish literary revival, and video game narratives.


Jonathan Albrite

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2008, BA English, James Madison University

2020, MA English, James Madison University

Bio

Broadly interested in posthumanism, ecocriticism, and affect theory, John’s research explores how nonhuman agents have shaped the literature and film of America’s long twentieth century. At the same time, he studies the productive tension between posthumanism’s push to consider nonhuman lives and the ongoing work of critical race, gender, and disability scholars, who advocate for the human lives ignored by systems of power.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rose Steptoe

September 22, 2020

Degrees

2019, BA English and History, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

Rose Steptoe is a second-year Ph.D. student and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her research focuses on examining gender, body horror, and women’s authorship in horror films.


Karah Mitchell

July 13, 2020

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Missouri at Columbia

2014, BA English (French minor), Louisiana State University at Baton Rouge

Bio

I am a PhD candidate studying American literature of the long nineteenth century with a focus on critical animal studies, histories of natural science, and poetics. In my dissertation project, “The Call of Kind”: Humanizing the Animal in American Literature, 1830-1918, I am exploring the connections between literary genres and the emergence of the modern pet industry from Sarah Josepha Hale’s 1830 poem “Mary’s Lamb” to the establishment of the Jack London Club by the Massachusetts SPCA in 1918. I consider how poetry, pet autobiographies, and fiction were all primary means through which writers humanized animals during this period, thereby influencing material changes that were made to improve animal welfare; I postulate that works now deemed “literary” accounted in large part for the rise in pet-keeping as an industry and in modern veterinary practices. With my focus on humanization and animal welfare, I wish to build upon and complicate recent posthumanist-driven arguments in the field of American literary studies as I investigate the poetics of domestic animal care.

In my future work, I am interested in exploring how we might connect the field of critical animal studies with modern veterinary science; I thus wish to connect theory with practice with respect to animal care. I would ultimately like to develop ways for placing literary studies and veterinary science into more direct conversation with one another in a manner that is similar to, yet different from, the medical humanities.


Publications:

“A Posthumous Life: Thoreau and the Possibilities of Posthuman Biography,” The Concord Saunterer Vol. 27, 2019 (roundtable article from MLA 2019)

Review of Laura Dassow Walls’s Henry David Thoreau: A Life for the Emerson Society Papers (Fall 2018, vol. 29, no. 2)

Online Review of LeAnne Howe’s Savage Conversations for The Carolina Quarterly (March 2019)

Online Review​ of Caleb Johnson’s ​Treeborne: A Novel f​or ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(September 2018)

Online Review​ of Filip Springer’s ​History of a Disappearance: The Story of a Forgotten Polish Town​ for ​The Carolina Quarterly ​(April 2018)


Awards

Robert Bain Award for Excellence Achieved by a Second-Year Student in Pre-1900 American Literature, 2018


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Krysten Voelkner

October 28, 2019

Degrees

2018, MA English, Wake Forest University

2016, BA English, Drexel University

Bio

Krysten is a PhD student and teaching fellow in the department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests reside at the intersection of environmental humanities and contemporary LatinX literature. Topics which she finds exciting relate to the rhetoric of environmental advocacy, the myriad of emotional responses to the threat of climate change, and the ways in which LatinX writers and artists create environmental epistemologies through their works. Outside of the academy, she enjoys nurturing all forms of human and other life through her passion for plants and pets.


Publications:

  • “Memory, Temporality, and Communal Realization: Reading the Nomadic Subject in Rivera’s ...And the Earth Did Not Devour Him.” Aztlán: A Journal of Chicano Studies, vol. 45, no. 2, 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • UNC Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award (Fall 2020)

Awards

  • H. Broadus Jones MA Student Award for Excellence in English (Spring 2018)

Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. candidate in the English Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His writing and teaching percolates through twentieth- and twenty-first-century philosophy, cultural theory, literature, film, art and new media – specializing in the history and theory of games. Doug’s dissertation – Askēsis Machines: Gaming, Training, and Habit in Digital Cultures – explores how digitally mediated exercise constitutes a primary means whereby perception, thought, movement and, ultimately, life has taken shape since, roughly, the mid-Twentieth Century. Taking games – including video games – as objects, the dissertation focuses on the repeated practice of play as a mode of cultivating the capacities, rhythms and habits of humans and non-humans in military, institutional, commercial, and artistic contexts. Doug has forthcoming and published work concerning media philosophy, futurity, self-cultivation, and games in Playing the Field (2019), Extrapolation (2020), Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds (2020), In Media Res (2020), Post-45 (2020), Encyclopedia of Video Games (est. 2021), Eludamos (est. 2021), and Que Parle (est. 2021).


Publications:

  • Stark, Doug. “Training for the Military? Some Historical Considerations Towards a Media Philosophical Computer Game Philosophy.” Eludamos. (Forthcoming est. 2021.)
  • Stark, Doug and Teresa O’ Rourke. “The Lost Futures of BoJack and Diane.” Post45, special cluster on Leaving Hollywoo: Essays After BoJack Horseman, 2020, https://post45.org/2020/11/the-lost-futures-of-bojack-and-diane/
  • Stark, Doug. “Reimagining Play with Lewis Carroll’s Croquet.” In Media Res, March 2020, http://mediacommons.org/imr/content/reimagining-play-lewis-carroll%E2%80%99s-croquet
  • Stark, Doug. “Unsettling Embodied Literacy in QWOP the Walking Simulator.” Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 49–67.
  • Stark, Doug. “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series,” Extrapolation, vol. 61, no. 1-2, 2020, pp. 151–171.
  • Stark, Doug. “Video Game Novels.” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2021)
  • Stark, Doug. “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and 2020 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality.

My research is published or forthcoming in American Literature, Configurations, and Mississippi Quarterly. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 128: Major American Authors, ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • “‘Multiplied without Number’: Lynching, Statistics, and Visualization in Ida B. Wells, Mark Twain, and WEB Du Bois” American Literature 92.3 (Spring 2021): forthcoming
  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2020-2021
  • Quarry Farm Short-Term Fellowship, Center for Mark Twain Studies, 2020
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, UNC Public Humanities 2019-2020
  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019
  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016


Curriculum Vitae / Resume