Brendan Chambers

September 11, 2019
Photo of Brendan Chambers

Degrees

2019, BA English, Boston College

Bio

Brendan is a PhD student studying 20th century American literature.  His interests lie at the nexus of literature and phenomenology, exploring how writers across genres represent consciousness and perception in their writing.


Publications:

  • “Phenomenological Reproduction in Thompson and Mailer’s New Journalism.” Dianoia. (Spring 2019)

Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Boston College, 2019

Elisabeth McClanahan

August 14, 2019
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

 

Bio

Elisabeth is a first year PhD student in English whose research focuses on intersections of trauma, race, and religion in the writings of nineteenth century American women. Drawing on her professional experience as a social worker, she also looks at ways that literature simultaneously gives voice to those who are unwell and offers the potential to become more well.


Awards

  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant

Geovani Ramírez

May 23, 2019

Degrees

BA English, University of North Carolina at Wilmington (summa cum laude)

MA British and American Literature, North Carolina State University

Bio

Geovani Ramírez is a Ph.D candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill, where he specializes in Multiethnic and Latinx literature. His dissertation explores the ways Mexican-heritage women writers use the topic of labor in their works to interrogate and re-shape notions of class, race, gender, culture, (trans)national identities, and citizenship.

While at UNC, Geovani has enjoyed working with UNC students in various capacities, including as a graduate research consultant for Latinx and Women’s and Gender Studies literature courses, sole instructor for ENGL 105 Composition and Rhetoric, ENGL 105i Writing in the Social Sciences, and courses in Women’s and Gender Studies and literature. From fall 2014 to spring 2018, Geovani worked as a writing coach at the UNC Writing Center, where he coached undergraduate and graduate students from all disciplines on a wide range of writing genres and projects. He has also been an assistant writing coordinator for the Moore Undergraduate Research Apprentice Program since the summer of 2018.

Geovani was a graduate student fellow at the UNC Center for Faculty Excellence during the 2018-2019 academic year, and he joined the UNC Latina/o Studies Program as a graduate assistant in the spring of 2019.


Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Center for the Study of the American South Travel Grant, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Lea/McLaurin Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018
  • George Hills Harper Summer Research Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sean DiLeonardi

April 10, 2018

Degrees

M.A. University of Colorado, Boulder

B.A. Illinois State University

Bio

Sean DiLeonardi teaches and writes broadly about contemporary American literature and its relationship to race, technology, science, and media. Drawing from an interdisciplinary mix of literary criticism, media theory, and science/technology studies, Sean’s research catalogues the effects of new technologies on literary form and, inversely, literary culture’s role in shaping American discourse on race, science, and digitality.

 

Sean is currently preparing a dissertation that traces an epistemological shift in scientific and literary ideas about probability in the American midcentury. The dissertation argues that an array of new media—from digital translators to the first major English translation of the I Ching—automates probability, thus inspiring a set of formal innovations in both scientific and literary narratives. 

 

Chair, 2017-18 Boundaries of Literature Symposium

Co-editor, Ethos Review (http://www.ethosreview.org/)

Co-organizer, the Americanist Speaker Series, in collaboration with Duke English


Publications:

  • “Cryptographic Reading: Machine Translation, the New Criticism, and Nabokov’s Pnin,” Post45: Peer-Reviewed (forthcoming)

Awards

  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship. Dean’s Office, College of Arts and Sciences, 2018-19.
  • Carl Hartsell Award for Teaching Excellence. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2018
  • Research Fellowship. The Graduate School, UNC, Spring 2018.
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship. Carolina Public Humanities, 2017-18.
  • Robert Bain Award. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2016.
  • Digital Media Internship. SITES Laboratory, UNC, 2015-16.
  • Travel Grant. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2014.
  • Travel Grant. United Gov. for Graduate Students, UC Boulder, 2013.
  • Brome Creative Writing Award. English Dept., ISU, 2007.
  • Associated Bank National Scholarship. 2003.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD student in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania in 2015 with a BA in English and German, and creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My research interests are centered around the destabilization of nationalism and time in 19th century American literature.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume