Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality. Whether claimed as the embodiment of democracy itself or shamed as a primitive resurgence, the crowd was for both white and black constituencies a pliable, powerful instrument.

My research on related topics has been published in Mississippi Quarterly and Configurations. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019

  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Erin Piemont

October 30, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

Erin Piemont studies postwar American poetry with special attention to poets of the New York School. Her research interests include lyric theory, the poetics of space, and relationships between postmodern poetry and contemporary critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.

Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica is a PhD student in Comparative Literature and teaching assistant in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures. She focuses on 19th and 20th century Russian and Eastern European literature. Her MA thesis (2013)  explored the role of death in Tolstoy’s War and Peace. Her current research interests include animal studies, atrocity, utopias/dystopias, revolutions, and the concept of death.

 

 


Awards

  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)

Anna Carson Levett

April 24, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA French and English (with emphasis in Creative Writing), University of Pennsylvania

Bio

Anna Levett is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature. Specializing in twentieth century French/Francophone and Arabic literature, her work primarily focuses on Mediterranean studies and global modernism, with a secondary focus on film studies. Her dissertation, Mediterranean Dream-Places: The Past and Future of Surrealism in Late 20th century Arab Literature, concerns the reception of French surrealism in the Arab world. From 2015-2016, she was a fellow at the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (CASA) in Cairo, Egypt. In Fall 2018 she will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She has published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.


Publications:

  • “‘Shouldn’t Love Be the One True Thing?’ Godard and the Legacy of Surrealist Ethics,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 34.8 (Summer 2017).


Awards

  • Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France (Fall 2018)
  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC Graduate School (2016-2017)
  • Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) Fellowship, American University in Cairo (2015-2016)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (2012-2013)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, Qasid Institute, Amman, Jordan (Summer 2012)
  • FLAS – Beginning Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (Summer 2011)
  • Best Graduate Essay in Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2010-2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

  • Guest editor, with Doreen Thierauf, of a special issue of Women’s Writing on “Generations” (forthcoming 2018)

Awards

  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a doctoral student in English and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her work lies at the intersection of queer and transgender studies, poststructuralist feminist theorizing, and American culture studies. She is particularly interested in representations of non-normative gendered embodiments and transgressive sexualities in 20th century multiethnic American literature. In May of 2017, Rachel received the Winchester Fellowship from her alma mater to prepare for comprehensive exams and conduct preliminary research for her prospectus. She has also worked in the emerging field of health humanities by helping convene the 2016 Health Humanities Exchange conference at UNC-CH and serving as director of the of Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium for the 2016-2017 academic year.