Moira Marquis

April 2, 2019

Degrees

M.L.A.             Humanities, University of North Carolina Asheville, 2010

B.A.                  History, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, MA, 2006

Bio

Moira Marquis is an eco-critical decolonialist studying contemporary Anglophone novels. Her dissertation, The Dialectic of Myth: Creating Meaning in the Anthropocene, examines how contemporary Anglophone novelists are using traditional myths to tell stories about ecological destruction and climate change which offer alternatives to techno-fix futures or the apocalypse. She is also interested in the Irish language and other minor languages abilities to foster ecological understanding. Her interests are in decolonialism, eco-criticism and environmental humanities, eco-linguistics and myth.


Teaching Awards

2017  Senior Teaching Fellowship, Department of English, UNCCH

2016  Erika Lindemann Award for Excellence in Teaching Literature, UNCCH

2015  Future Faculty Fellowship, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNCCH

2015  Professional Development Award, English Department, UNCCH

2014  Presidential Scholars Program Distinguished Teacher Award

2013-2017 UNC Chapel Hill Teaching Fellowship


Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

MA, Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies, The University of Alabama

BA, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature, medicine, and culture. She completed her master’s thesis, “‘They are gone to read upon me’: The Donnean Body-Text”, with the Hudson Strode Program for Shakespeare and Renaissance Studies in 2013. After graduating, she worked as an editor and writer for the Institute for Rural Health Research. Her recent work has focused on physician-patient exchanges and early modern treatment of the corpse.


Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael Fox

October 22, 2018

Degrees

M.A. English, University of Virginia

B.S. Computer Science (with a minor in Applied Mathematics), University of Virginia

Bio

As a doctoral candidate in English at UNC-Chapel Hill, I’m completing my dissertation entitled “The Aesthete’s Idea of History.” I’m the Assistant Editor and Software Architect at the William Blake Archive. And my interests include 19th-century British literature, Aestheticism, philosophy of history, poetry and poetics, literary theory, and the digital humanities.


Publications:

Humanities

Computer Science


Awards

  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2019.
  • Featured Project—The Redesign of the William Blake Archive, The Association for Documentary Editing (ADE), 2017.

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature. His research focuses on exchanges among drama, philosophy, politics, and theology in pre- and post-reformation Europe. He is particularly interested in the ways reformation theology modified English theatrical tradition.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jerrod Rosenbaum

August 15, 2018

Degrees

2009, BA English (magna cum laude with research distinction in English), The Ohio State University

2013, MA English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

Jerrod Rosenbaum’s interests include the English Bible, Christian Semitism, the Protestant Reformation, and the legacy of the Crusades. He writes on More, Spenser, Ariosto, and Tasso. His dissertation involves European interaction with the Near East in the sixteenth century, especially concerning Latin Christendom’s utilization of Semitic languages, literature, and religion for polemical purposes during the Protestant Reformation.


Publications:

“Spenser’s Merlin Rehabilitated,” Spenser Studies: A Renaissance Poetry Annual 29 (2014), 149-178.


Awards

Julius S. Hanner Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2010-2011).

Bruce Lea, Jr. Graduate Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of English and Comparative Literature (November, 2014).

Richardson Dissertation Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Department of English and Comparative Literature (Fall, 2017).

Howell-Voitle Award for outstanding work on a dissertation in the Early Modern Period (2016- 2017).


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Anna Carson Levett

April 24, 2018

Degrees

2007, BA French and English (with emphasis in Creative Writing), University of Pennsylvania

Bio

Anna Levett is a doctoral candidate in comparative literature. Specializing in twentieth century French/Francophone and Arabic literature, her work primarily focuses on Mediterranean studies and global modernism, with a secondary focus on film studies. Her dissertation, Mediterranean Dream-Places: The Past and Future of Surrealism in Late 20th century Arab Literature, concerns the reception of French surrealism in the Arab world. From 2015-2016, she was a fellow at the Center for Arabic Studies Abroad (CASA) in Cairo, Egypt. In Fall 2018 she will be a fellow at the Camargo Foundation in Cassis, France. She has published in Quarterly Review of Film and Video.


Publications:

  • “‘Shouldn’t Love Be the One True Thing?’ Godard and the Legacy of Surrealist Ethics,” Quarterly Review of Film and Video 34.8 (Summer 2017).


Awards

  • Camargo Foundation Residency, Cassis, France (Fall 2018)
  • Dissertation Completion Fellowship, UNC Graduate School (2016-2017)
  • Center for Arabic Study Abroad (CASA) Fellowship, American University in Cairo (2015-2016)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (2012-2013)
  • FLAS – Advanced Arabic, Qasid Institute, Amman, Jordan (Summer 2012)
  • FLAS – Beginning Arabic, UNC-Chapel Hill (Summer 2011)
  • Best Graduate Essay in Comparative Literature, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2010-2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume