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Catherine (Cate) Rivers

September 24, 2021

Degrees

2019, BA English, North Carolina State University

Bio

Cate Rivers is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. She graduated from North Carolina State University in 2019 with a BA in English and minors in history and Japan studies. Her main area focuses are the Southern United States and Japan. Her interests span trauma studies, nationalism, memory, gender and critical race theories, modernism, cultural representations of mental illness, mysticism, and Buddhist literature. Her ongoing research project frames 20th century Japanese novels and novels from the Southern Renaissance as social histories, with particular attention to war memory, family history, culpability, the construction of “family,” and the relation between national identity and self-conception.


Joshua Ripple

August 4, 2021

Degrees

2019, BAH English, Stanford University

2021, MA Philosophy, The New School for Social Research

Bio

I am primarily interested in 20th century Southern literature, but also have interests in philosophy, film, anthropology, science fiction, religion, comparative literature, and approximately everything else.


Elisabeth McClanahan Harris

June 15, 2021
Photo of Elisabeth McClanahan

Degrees

2019, MA English, George Washington University

2012, BA Humanities, Columbia International University

Bio

Elisabeth studies 19th century American literature and medicine, focusing on how changing theories of mental illness and its treatment were encoded in congregate care institutions over the course of the century. Her research, which draws on a varied archive of patient memoirs, journalistic exposes, and fictional depictions of congregate care, investigates entanglements of race, gender, and disability in questions of mental healthcare.


Publications:

“Conversion and Countermemory: Jarena Lee, Maria Stewart, and the Spiritual Motherhood of Mary Magdalene.” Nineteenth-Century American Women Writers and Theologies of the Afterlife: A Step Closer to Heaven, edited by Emily Hamilton-Honey and Jennifer McFarlane Harris, Routledge, 2021.


Awards

  • Robert Bain Award for scholarship in American Literature, UNC English Department, 2021
  • Southern Futures Graduate Award, 2020
  • McCandlish Endowment Fellowship, 2017-2019
  • PEO Continuing Education Grant, 2018

Nathan Andrew Quinn

January 21, 2021

Degrees

2016, BA English, Princeton University

Bio

Nathan possesses a strong interest in late 20th and 21st century American literature, with a particular focus on contemporary works with magical realist and “hysterical realist” elements. This interest has led him in the direction of postsecular theory and the philosophy of language.


Anthony DiNardo

September 28, 2020

Degrees

2018, AA Liberal Arts, Northern Virginia Community College

2020, BA English/History, Mary Baldwin University

Bio

Tony DiNardo is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Their main area of research deals with the value positionings of, and the cultural work performed by, the fantastic from the medieval romance to modern genre fantasy and science fiction. They have also done more conventional work in medieval and early modern theological and devotional thought from Wyclif to Donne. Other interests of theirs include Stuart historiography, faith and labor in the Victorian social novel, the poetry of the Irish literary revival, and video game narratives.


Bailey Fernandez

June 26, 2020
Photo of Bailey Fernandez, taken by Emily Youree

Degrees

2019: B.A. English, Hampshire College.

Bio

Bailey Fernandez is a literary critic and scholar primarily working within the British Romantic period, though he is interested in contemporary literature as well. His thematic interests consist primarily in aesthetics, the philosophy of language, and the formal interchanges between literature, art, and music.

In addition to his scholarship, he also engages in editorial work.  He is a project assistant at The William Blake Archive and an associate editor at the Carolina Quarterly. In his spare time, he writes music and poetry.


Publications:

Sun Cycle: A Review” Carolina Quarterly no. 69, vol. 4 (Summer 2020)


Awards

Digital Innovation Lab, 2019-20


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jared Powell

October 28, 2019
Photo of Jared Powell, taken by Emma Duvall

Degrees

2018, MA English, University of Alabama

2016, BA English and Religious Studies, University of Alabama

Bio

Jared Powell is a second-year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. His interests include British Romanticism, visual culture and arts, narrative and adaptation theory, and digital humanities. He is also a Project Assistant for the William Blake Archive.


Teaching Awards

C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, Humanities, 2019


Awards

  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2019
  • UNC Center for Global Initiatives REACH Fellow, Summer 2019

Colin Dekeersgieter

September 25, 2019

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, University of Vermont

2014, M.A. Modern Literature, CUNY, Graduate Center

2017, M.F.A. Creative Writing, Poetry, New York University

 

Bio

Colin Dekeersgieter is a poet and Ph.D. candidate in English and Comparative Literature invested in modern poetry, poetics, and (neuro)aesthetics. His work has appeared or is forthcoming in the North American Review, Green Mountains Review, The Worcester Review, and elsewhere.


Awards

  • Goldwater Fellowship, New York University, 2017

Katharine Henry

February 15, 2019

Degrees

2015, English MA, California State University Los Angeles

2013, English BA, University of California Berkeley

2013, Political Science BA, University of California Berkeley

Bio

I am a PhD student studying social reform in nineteenth-century American literature and culture, especially in regards to gender and sexuality. I am interested in how literature of the period engages with the free love movement and utopianism. The Oneida Community and Brook Farm are two experimental utopian communities of great interest to me. Additional areas of interest include: women’s writing, sentimental fiction, gothic literature, African American literature, and the American Civil War.


Publications:

  • Matthew Teutsch and Katharine Henry, “‘Memories wasn’t a place, memories was in the mind’: the Gothic in Ernest J. Gaines’s The Autobiography of Miss Jane Pittman,” Mississippi Quarterly vol. 68, no. 3-4 (2015): 511-530.

Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, UNC Center for Faculty Excellence, Spring 2018
  • Jamie Guilbeau and Thelma Guilbeau Collections Research Grant, University of Louisiana at Lafayette Department of History and Geography, 2017-2018
  • Robert Bain Award for Excellence in Southern Literature, UNC English Department, 2016-2017
  • Initiative for Minority Excellence Scholar, UNC Graduate School, 2015-2020

Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume