Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Leslie Rowen

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA English, Bellarmine University

Bio

Leslie Rowen’s focuses her research on 19th & 20th Century American Literature, with a particular interest in war and legacy. Other topics include crime, violence, trauma studies, and memory.


Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Mark Collins

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2011, B.A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

2012, M.A. History, Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Mark Collins is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in the fields of contemporary American and multi-ethnic literature and women’s and gender studies. His academic interests include: feminist theory, science and technology studies, critical race theory, and cultural studies. Mark is currently working on his dissertation project, called “Nuclear Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Reproductive Control in US Cold War Speculative Fiction,” which explores the relationship between the discourses of nuclear warfare and reproduction in literary and cultural texts from the decades spanning the Cold War period.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sarah George-Waterfield

April 13, 2018

Degrees

2010, BA English, History, Political Science, Vanderbilt University

2013, MA English, Southern Illinois Univerity

Bio

A Midwestern transplant to North Carolina, Sarah has taken a circuitous route to Chapel Hill. After graduating from Vanderbilt with too many majors, she joined the Peace Corps as an Environmental Extension in Mali where she helped build women’s gardens, drank a lot of tea, and made friends with goats. She is currently working on an alternative dissertation that highlights fabric, cloth, and textiles in contemporary multi-ethnic literature. She’s creating an art installation from texts and textiles, exploring how memory, gender, kinship, and labor get lodged in warps and wefts. She lives in Hillsborough with her husband, a dog and two cats rescued from the North Carolina wilderness, and nine chickens who do their own thing. She’s the current Editor-in-Chief for The Carolina Quarterly, and spends a lot of her time telling campus stories through her work with UNC Visitors Center.


Awards

  • UNC Royster Fellow