Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

Nikki Roulo’s research focuses primarily upon early modern literature. In particular, she is interested in the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, who bridges both genres, and ballads and music within early modern texts.


Publications:

  • “Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. 206 pp. $104.95 ISBN: 9781472458322.” In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018).
  • “Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. 385 pp. $40.00 ISBN: 9780226415970.” In Journal of Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018).

Awards

  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology

Erik Maloney

July 27, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA in English and Comparative Literature, summa cum laude, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

My research focuses on exchanges among literature, science, philosophy, and theology in early modern Europe.


Awards

  • 2016-17, North Carolina Native American Incentive Grant
  • 2016-17, Ruth Rose Richardson award for the outstanding record in the first year of graduate study

Ashley Werlinich

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA in English Literature, University of Pittsburgh

Bio

Ashley Werlinich is an English Literature doctoral student and teaching fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill.  She is interested in the intersections between 17th century natural philosophy, medicine, and drama—primarily in considering how these intersections can help us understand questions of body and embodiment in early modern literature. In addition to her work as a graduate teaching fellow, Ashley also works as a rare books and special collections instructor with Wilson Library Special Collections.


Publications:

  • David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Katharine Landers, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich, “‘Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance,” Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: emcIMPRINT, forthcoming).

Awards

  • Triangle University Internship Program, Spring 2018

Bridget C. Donnelly

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, Lawrence University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and I specialize in British literature of the long eighteenth century and the history of the novel. My dissertation project considers shifting discourses surrounding accidental events throughout the eighteenth century, framing the analysis around fictional representations of carriage accidents in texts like Tobias Smollett’s Humphry Clinker, Frances Burney’s Evelina, Mary Hays’s Memoirs of Emma Courtney, and Jane Austen’s Love and Friendship. 


Publications:

  • “‘Chequer-Work[s] of Providence’: Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe’s Fiction.” Philosophy and Literature. Forthcoming.
  • Five entries in The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820. Ed. April London. Cambridge University Press. Forthcoming 2018.

Awards

  • W.M. Keck Foundation Fellowship for research at the Huntington Library, awarded March 2018
  • Huntington Library Travel Grant to the United Kingdom, awarded March 2018
  • Aubrey Williams Research Travel Grant, American Society for 18th-Century Studies, awarded March 2018
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Travel Award for archival research in England, awarded October 2017
  • Best Graduate Student Paper, International Society for the Study of Narrative, awarded June 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Edward Hyunsoo Yang

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Literature and Political Science, Loyola Marymount University

2015, MA English, Claremont Graduate University

Bio

My research interests include the history of the novel, narrative performance, and authenticity. Drawing from British novels of the Long Eighteenth Century and Twentieth Century American novels, I hope to produce a project that examines narrative interruptions: moments in a text when a voice, distinct from that of any other character, enters the narrative.

Some of my past research examines: the performance of authenticity in The Catcher in the Rye and Franny and Zoey, competing narrative frames in Frankenstein, a blending of genres in The Castle of Otranto, resistance to introspection in Mumblecore films, and the role of authenticity in Hip Hop.


Awards

  • Fulbright, English Teaching Assistantship (Germany), 2016-17

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Anne Fertig

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2013, Honors BA English Literature, Rollins College
2014, MLitt Scottish History, University of Glasgow
2015, MPhil English Literature, University of Glasgow

Bio

Anne Fertig is currently a doctoral student in English Literature. Her research centers around history writing in the long eighteenth century, including historiography, historical fiction, and antiquarianism. With interest in the Scottish Enlightenment and Romanticism, her work uses English, Scots, and Scottish Gaelic to explore the intersections of culture and language in Scotland and Britain. She was a former Fulbright Postgraduate Scholar at the University of Glasgow (2013-2014) and the co-editor of A Song of Glasgow Town: The Collected Poems of Marion Bernstein (Association for Scottish Literary Studies, 2013).


Publications:

  • “Castle Howard”; “Conirdan”; “Julius Fitz-John,” The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, (Forthcoming).
  • “’Ancient, Hardy, Pugnacious, and Poor’: Margaret Oliphant’s Form and Conformation in ‘Scottish National Character’ and Kirsteen.” The Essay: Forms and Transformations. (Universitätsverlag Winter: Heidelburg, 2017)
  • Cohen,  Edward H. and Anne Fertig, “A Curious Exchange between Marion Bernstein and Mary Inglis,” Studies in Scottish Literature 41 (2016): 267-276.
  • Cohen,  Edward H. and Anne Fertig,  “Marion Bernstein and the Glasgow Weekly Mail in the 1870s,” Victorian Periodical Review 49.1 (2016): 9-27.
  • Cohen, Edward H., Anne Fertig, and Linda Fleming, eds. ‘A Song of Glasgow Town’: the Collected Works of Marion Bernstein. (Association of Scottish Literary Studies: Glasgow, 2013)

Awards

  • Merit Assistant Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2015-2016
  • Fulbright Postgraduate Scholarship, University of Glasgow, 2013-2014

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Migrations Lab at Duke University Department of English. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of  the Studio for Instructional Technology and English Studies.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Data Plus Project Fellow, Information Initiative, Duke University. $2500, 2018.
  • UNC/King’s College Fund, The Institute for Arts and the Humanities, UNC-CH, $1980. 2018.
  • Migrations Fellow, Dept. of English, Duke University. $750, 2017
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2017.

Morgan Souza

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2014, MA English, Florida Gulf Coast University

2011, BA English, Florida Gulf Coast University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at UNC Chapel Hill studying medieval and early modern literature. I’m specifically interested in early modern encyclopedias, epistemology, and the history of science. I’m also interested in insects, gastropods, gender and sexuality, power dynamics, amphibians and amphibiousness, fungi, and the confluence of natural philosophy/magic/religion.


Awards

  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in aid, After the Great Instauration taught by Reid Barbour, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in aid, Introduction to English Paleography taught by Heather Wolfe, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in aid, Scale of Catastrophe taught by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen, 2015

Curriculum Vitae / Resume