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Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, UNC Chancellor’s Awards, Spring 2021
  • Erika Lindemann Award for Demonstrated Excellence in Teaching, UNC English and Comparative Literature Department, Spring 2020
  • Professional Development Award, UNC Writing Program, Fall 2018-Spring 2021

Awards

  • Dean’s Fellowship, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Spring 2022
  • Off-Campus Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, Spring 2020
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Research Grant, UNC MEMS, Spring 2020
  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, Spring 2020
  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, UNC MEMS, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Trisha Federis Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Federis Remetir is a doctoral candidate at UNC Chapel Hill who writes about transpacific migration, representations of water extractions, interspecies entanglements, coloniality, anglophone Filipinx and world literatures, and gender. In her research and teaching methods, she is committed to pushing the boundaries of literary, cultural, and media studies to examine questions of race, gender, and settler logics, while thinking about futures of care, transnational solidarity, and abolition with students.

Trisha’s dissertation, Unfamiliar Waters: Representations of Resource Extraction in the Philippines, 1970s to present, argues that extractive projects in waters in and around the Philippines have altered the composition of water, both on material and representational scales. By examining  examples of water in transnational Filipinx contemporary poetry, 1970s Filipino social realist film, historical archives, and other media, this project pushes against the assumption that the Philippines’ relationship to the Global North is solely defined by extraction of inanimate resources on land (such as oils and minerals)—in fact, this project argues that 20- and 21st century extractive water projects are focusing more on the management of renewable resources and regulating the movement of animate beings (such as human bodies and fish), to the detriment of all. The three chapters, entitled SaltwaterFreshwater, and Storms, each take on three  “types” of water as they were redefined by various moments of resource extraction, such as transnational migration patterns set into place during the Marcos authoritarian regime, movements to nationalize freshwater spaces for aquaculture, and tenuous responses to ever-increasing typhoons. This project makes significant contributions to the  Critical Filipino Studies, Feminist Science and Technology Studies (STS), and media and cultural studies by conversing with scientific archives and artists as they make sense of their changing relationships to water and aquatic life. And lastly, the project contends that Filipino/a/x water aesthetics also challenges extraction’s singular vision of water by uncovering manifold ways of living in relation to water.  In so doing, artists and cultural producers in this study alter water’s cultural and material makeup as well.

Trisha’s forthcoming work can be seen in the edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular culture, and in public digital humanities projects as a 2020 Imagining America PAGE fellow. She has taught courses in digital humanities, world literature, ocean literature, and film.


Publications:

2021                (Forthcoming) “Aquaculture Visions, Techno-Settler Hierarchies, and The Mysterious Milkfish (1982),” edited collection Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, ed. Paul Michael Atienza and Dr. Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez.

 

2020                (Forthcoming) “National Properties, National Ecologies: Postcolonial and ecocritical engagements with Mikhail Red’s Birdshot (2016),” edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular Culture, ed. Dr. Jason Telles and Dr. Charles Ryan.


Teaching Awards

2020

  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

Awards

2021

  • Digital Dissertation Fellowship

2020

  • Chancellor’s Doctoral Candidacy Award
  • Humanities for the Public Good Grant
  • UC Speculative Futures Collective grant
  • Southeast Asian Language Council Tuition Support Award
  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

2019

  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award
  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellow
  • Institute of the Arts and Humanities Travel Award
  • Representing Migrations Humanities Lab Fellowship (Duke)

2018

  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a PhD student and teaching fellow studying the intersections of experimental poetics, labor practices, and digital infrastructures.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

My research focuses on environmental justice in the Anthropocene. I am interested in the convergences in the fields of ecocriticism, post-colonial theory and global socioeconomics, to examine how the effects of climate change, displacement, toxic and electronic waste, and resource extraction are differentially experienced across the Global North and South. I am also interested reading in environmental advocacy through the the intersections between art and activism in grassroots movements. I study gobal anglophone literature, with a focus on environmental justice movements in India and the U.S.A.


Teaching Awards

  • LSP Graduate Student Affiliate Teaching Award, Fall 2021

Awards

  • Centre for the Studies of the American South Summer Fellowship, 2021

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian S. Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature, primarily drama placed in its religiopolitical and material contexts. His research interests include the histories of religion and emotion, occult knowledge, and literary representations of the Devil. His most recent publication places William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in its contemporary religious and scientific contexts by exploring the toxicological roles of night, crypts, and demons in the play. He has previously delivered papers on the Devil and humor in Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass, Paracelsianism in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and medieval theories of predestination in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Smith’s current project interrogates the relationship between the reception of Calvinist doctrine and “horror” as an affect in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century tragedy, epic, and sermons.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Forthcoming. “‘No healthsome air breathes in’: Spiritual Poison in Romeo and Juliet,” Poison on the Early Modern Stage, edited by Lisa Hopkins and Kibrina Davey (Manchester University Press).

Media & Impact

Curatorial Work


Awards

  • ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Eating through the Archives: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Modern Foodways Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, December 2019
  • Sara Malone Conference Grant, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, May 2019
  • Florence Hoagland Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior English Major, Bethany College Department of Humanities, Spring 2015
  • W. F. Kennedy Prize for Outstanding Junior Man, Bethany College, Spring 2014
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Junior English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2014
  • Bettie Blanck Travel Award, BC Department of Humanities, Fall 2013
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Sophomore English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Eleanor Griggs

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and History, Grinnell College

Bio

Eleanor Griggs is a doctoral student studying Medieval Literature. Her work focuses on ecology, historiography, and time in Middle English poetry, romance, and encyclopedic writing.


Publications:

“The Orchard and the ‘Ympe Tre’: Gardening, Mastery, and Ecology in Sir Orfeo” Comitatus 50:1 (2019): 97-118.


Awards

2018 Joseph Breen Award for Outstanding Work in the Field of Medieval Studies


Ani Govjian

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, University of California Irvine
2007, BA English, Loyola Marymount University

Bio

I study medieval and early modern literature because it is wild, interesting, weird, and fun. My dissertation, “Tricks of Faith: Trickery as Jest, Test, Experiment, and Corrective in Early Modern English Literature,” focuses on the representation of scientific thinking as it intersects with religious experience on the English stage. As an educator, I bring a little bit of the magical, early modern past into the classroom by teaming up with UNC’s Wilson Rare Book Library and the Ackland Art museum for immersive student projects. I also work as a project assistant for the Blake Archive where I get to generate xml mark-up for some truly captivating William Blake illustrations.


Teaching Awards

  • James R. Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2016-2017
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2016-2017
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Faculty Excellence, Fall 2017
  • UNC Writing Program Professional Engagement & Pedagogy Award, 2015-2016

Awards

  • Off-Campus Dissertation Research Fellowship, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Paleography Seminar taught by Dr. Heather Wolfe, 2017
  • Department of English and Comparative Literature Departmental Research Fellowship, Summer 2017
  • Chi-Jung Chu Memorial Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Seminar Fellowship, “Researching the Archive,” taught by Dr. Keith Wrightson and Dr. James Siemon, 2016-2017
  • Medieval & Early Modern Studies Center travel Grant, Fall 2013, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017
  • Chapel Hill Medieval & Early Modern Studies Center Graduate Recruitment Award, 2012-2013
  • University of California Irvine – MA Thesis Distinction Award, 2012

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemological mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies but are also foundational to the printing of early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Specialized Composition, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019

Awards

  • Lindemann Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Spring 2020
  • Folger Shakespeare Library, Grant-in-aid, Book Theory Weekend Seminar, taught by Juliet Fleming, 2019
  • Huntington Library, Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow, 2018
  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Year-Long Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish & Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume