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Brendan Chambers

September 11, 2019
Photo of Brendan Chambers

Degrees

2019, BA English, Boston College

Bio

Brendan is a PhD student studying 20th century American literature.  His interests lie at the nexus of literature and phenomenology, exploring how writers across genres represent consciousness and perception in their writing.


Publications:

  • “Phenomenological Reproduction in Thompson and Mailer’s New Journalism.” Dianoia. (Spring 2019)

Awards

  • Phi Beta Kappa, Boston College, 2019

David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Doug Stark

July 1, 2019

Degrees

2016, MA English, Loughborough University

2014, BA English, Loughborough University

Bio

Doug Stark is a Ph.D. candidate in the English Department at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. His writing and teaching percolates through twentieth- and twenty-first-century philosophy, cultural theory, literature, film, art and new media – specializing in the history and theory of games. Doug’s dissertation – Askēsis Machines: Gaming, Training, and Habit in Digital Cultures – explores how digitally mediated exercise constitutes a primary means whereby perception, thought, movement and, ultimately, life has taken shape since, roughly, the mid-Twentieth Century. Taking games – including video games – as objects, the dissertation focuses on the repeated practice of play as a mode of cultivating the capacities, rhythms and habits of humans and non-humans in military, institutional, commercial, and artistic contexts. Doug has forthcoming and published work concerning media philosophy, futurity, self-cultivation, and games in Playing the Field (2019), Extrapolation (2020), Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds (2020), In Media Res (2020), Post-45 (2020), Encyclopedia of Video Games (est. 2021), Eludamos (est. 2021), and Que Parle (est. 2021).


Publications:

  • Stark, Doug. “Training for the Military? Some Historical Considerations Towards a Media Philosophical Computer Game Philosophy.” Eludamos. (Forthcoming est. 2021.)
  • Stark, Doug and Teresa O’ Rourke. “The Lost Futures of BoJack and Diane.” Post45, special cluster on Leaving Hollywoo: Essays After BoJack Horseman, 2020, https://post45.org/2020/11/the-lost-futures-of-bojack-and-diane/
  • Stark, Doug. “Reimagining Play with Lewis Carroll’s Croquet.” In Media Res, March 2020, http://mediacommons.org/imr/content/reimagining-play-lewis-carroll%E2%80%99s-croquet
  • Stark, Doug. “Unsettling Embodied Literacy in QWOP the Walking Simulator.” Journal of Gaming & Virtual Worlds, vol. 12, no. 1, 2020, pp. 49–67.
  • Stark, Doug. “‘A More Realistic View:’ Reimagining Sympoietic Practice in Octavia Butler’s Parable Series,” Extrapolation, vol. 61, no. 1-2, 2020, pp. 151–171.
  • Stark, Doug. “Video Game Novels.” Encyclopedia of Video Games: The Culture, Technology and Art of Gaming, 2nd. ed., edited by Mark J. P. Wolf, Greenwood Press. (Forthcoming est. 2021)
  • Stark, Doug. “Ludic Literature: Ready Player One as Didactic Fiction for the Neoliberal Subject.” Playing the Field: Video Games and American Studies, edited by Sascha Pöhlmann, De Gruyter, 2019, pp. 153-173.

Awards

Games and Cultures Humanities Lab Fellow, Duke University. 2019-2020.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Trisha Federis Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Federis Remetir is a doctoral candidate at UNC Chapel Hill who writes about transpacific migration, representations of water extractions, interspecies entanglements, coloniality, anglophone Filipinx and world literatures, and gender. In her research and teaching methods, she is committed to pushing the boundaries of literary, cultural, and media studies to examine questions of race, gender, and settler logics, while thinking about futures of care, transnational solidarity, and abolition with students.

Trisha’s dissertation, Unfamiliar Waters: Representations of Resource Extraction in the Philippines, 1970s to present, argues that extractive projects in waters in and around the Philippines have altered the composition of water, both on material and representational scales. By examining  examples of water in transnational Filipinx contemporary poetry, 1970s Filipino social realist film, historical archives, and other media, this project pushes against the assumption that the Philippines’ relationship to the Global North is solely defined by extraction of inanimate resources on land (such as oils and minerals)—in fact, this project argues that 20- and 21st century extractive water projects are focusing more on the management of renewable resources and regulating the movement of animate beings (such as human bodies and fish), to the detriment of all. The three chapters, entitled SaltwaterFreshwater, and Storms, each take on three  “types” of water as they were redefined by various moments of resource extraction, such as transnational migration patterns set into place during the Marcos authoritarian regime, movements to nationalize freshwater spaces for aquaculture, and tenuous responses to ever-increasing typhoons. This project makes significant contributions to the  Critical Filipino Studies, Feminist Science and Technology Studies (STS), and media and cultural studies by conversing with scientific archives and artists as they make sense of their changing relationships to water and aquatic life. And lastly, the project contends that Filipino/a/x water aesthetics also challenges extraction’s singular vision of water by uncovering manifold ways of living in relation to water.  In so doing, artists and cultural producers in this study alter water’s cultural and material makeup as well.

Trisha’s forthcoming work can be seen in the edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular culture, and in public digital humanities projects as a 2020 Imagining America PAGE fellow. She has taught courses in digital humanities, world literature, ocean literature, and film.


Publications:

2021                (Forthcoming) “Aquaculture Visions, Techno-Settler Hierarchies, and The Mysterious Milkfish (1982),” edited collection Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, ed. Paul Michael Atienza and Dr. Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez.

 

2020                (Forthcoming) “National Properties, National Ecologies: Postcolonial and ecocritical engagements with Mikhail Red’s Birdshot (2016),” edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular Culture, ed. Dr. Jason Telles and Dr. Charles Ryan.


Teaching Awards

2020

  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

Awards

2021

  • Digital Dissertation Fellowship

2020

  • Chancellor’s Doctoral Candidacy Award
  • Humanities for the Public Good Grant
  • UC Speculative Futures Collective grant
  • Southeast Asian Language Council Tuition Support Award
  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

2019

  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award
  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellow
  • Institute of the Arts and Humanities Travel Award
  • Representing Migrations Humanities Lab Fellowship (Duke)

2018

  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a PhD student and teaching fellow studying the intersections of experimental poetics, labor practices, and digital infrastructures.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

  • 2017, BA Critical Studies in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2017, BA Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century hemispheric experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX exploration of the sonics and optics of our contemporary American Landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • Latina/o Studies Teaching Grant – 2020

Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Kristján Hannesson

April 23, 2018

Degrees

MA in Comparative Literature, University of Iceland

BA in Comparative Literature, University of Iceland

Bio

Kristján studies problems of grace and cultural continuity in Renaissance literature.


Publications:

Hannesson, Kristján. “Making Sense of Form: The Semantic Implications of Structure in Petrarch’s Double Sestina.” MLN, vol. 135, no. 1, 2020, pp. 34-54.


Eric Bontempo

April 20, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and French, Harding University

2017, MA English, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Bio

Eric Bontempo is a third-year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. His interests include nineteenth-century poetics, British Romanticism, aesthetic theory, and postsecular studies.


Publications:

  • “In Memoriam:  Reader-Response and the Virtual Construction of Consolation.” The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, vol. 14. no. 4 (2016), pp. 11-18.

Awards

  • UNC Center for Global Initiatives REACH Fellow, Summer 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jewell Thomas

April 14, 2018

Degrees

2010, BA English, Washington University in St. Louis

Bio

At UNC-Chapel Hill, I study the development of Early Modern thought (roughly 1500 AD – 1700 AD) in England, France, and Italy with Reid Barbour and Jessica Wolfe. I combine traditional and computational research methods to try to understand how revolutionary changes in science and theology in this period were received and interpreted in the different national literary traditions.


Publications:

  • Ning, B., Ghoshal, S., Thomas, J.B. (2018). Bayesian Method for Causal Inference in High-Dimensional Time Series with Applications to Sales Data. Bayesian Analysis.
  • Chen, X., Irie, K., Banks, D., Haslinger, R., Thomas, J.B., West, M. (2017). Bayesian Dynamic Modeling and Analysis of Streaming Network Data. JASA.
  • Thomas, J.B., Brier, M.R., Ortega, M., Benzinger, T.L., Ances, B.M. (2015). Weighted brain networks in disease: centrality and entropy in human immunodeficiency virus and aging. Neurobiology of Aging.
  • Thomas, J.B.*, Brier, M.R.*, Bateman, R.J., Snyder, A.Z., etc. (2014). Functional connectivity in autosomal dominant and late-onset Alzheimer disease. JAMA Neurology. *Co-first authors
  • Thomas, J.B., Brier, M.R., Vaida, F.F., Snyder, AZ., Ances, BM. (2013). Pathways to Neurodegeneration: Effects of HIV and Aging on Resting State Functional Connectivity.
  • Duchek, J.*, Balota, D.*, Thomas, J.B.*, Morris, J., Ances, B.M. (2013). Loss of Intra-Network Resting State Functional Connections in the Default Mode Network Predicts Working Memory Performance Deficits. Neuropsychologia. *Co-first authors
  • Brier, M.R., Thomas, J.B., Ances, B.M. (2013). Functional connectivity and graph theory in preclinical Alzheimer’s Disease. Neurobiology of Aging.
  • Ances, B.M., Benzinger, T.L., Christensen J.J., Thomas, J.B., et al. (2012). C11 Imaging of Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Associated Neurocognitive Disorder. Archives of Neurology.
  • Wright, P.W., Heaps, J.M., Shimony, J.S., Thomas, J.B., Ances, B.M. (2012). The effects of HIV and combination antiretroviral therapy on white matter integrity. AIDS.
  • Wang, L., Roe, C., Snyder, A.Z., Brier, M.R., Thomas, J.B., Benzinger, T., Morris, J.C., Ances, B.M. (2012). Family History of Alzheimer’s Disease Impacts Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Cognitively Normal Individuals. Annals of Neurology, In Press.
  • Brier, M.R., Thomas, J.B., Snyder, A.Z., Benzinger, A.M., Zhang, D., Raichle, M., Holtzman, D.M., Morris, J.C., Ances, B.M. (2012). Loss of Intra- and Inter-Network Resting State Functional Connections with Alzheimer’s Disease Progression. Journal of Neuros
  • Wang, L., Brier, M.R., Snyder, A.Z., Thomas, J.B., Fagan, A.M., Xiong, C., Benzinger, T.L., Holtzman, D., Morris, J.C., Ances, B.M. (2013). Amyloid-β and Tau independently affect resting state functional connectivity in the default mode network of cognitively normal individuals. JAMA Neurology.
  • Arbelaez, A.M., Su, Y., Thomas, J.B., Ances, B.M., Hershey, T. (2013) Arterial Spin-Labeling Quantification of Cerebral Blood Flow in Euglycemia and Hypoglycemia.
  • Wang, L., Day, J., Roe, C.M., Brier, M.R., Thomas, J.B., Benzinger, T.L., Morris, J.C., Ances, B.M. (2013). The APOE ε4 Allele Modulates the Effect of Donepezil on Resting-State Functional Connectivity in Patients with AD. Alzheimer’s Disease and Associated Disorders.
  • Thomas, J.B., (2008). “Keble Rowing: A History,” in Keble: Past and Present. Third Millenium Publishing.

Awards

2017, PhD Merit Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill