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Don Holmes

March 11, 2019
Photo of Don Holmes

Degrees

2014, BA English (Magna Cum Luade), University of Southern Mississippi

Bio

Don Holmes is a 5th year PhD student in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. His research interests are in early African American literature, specifically the 18thand early 19thcenturies. His dissertation explores early black writers of their methods in critiquing and subverting systems of racial geographies (institutions of white supremacy). At Carolina, Don has taught English composition and currently teaches English 128: Major American Authors with a focus on lesser-known American women authors, including Lucy Terry, Phillis Wheatley, and Grace Paley. Don has taught English composition at North Carolina Central University and will return there this summer.


Publications:

  • Holmes, Don. A “charitable institution”: University of North Carolina in the Era of the Civil War” in Persistence through Peril: Episodes of College Life and Academic Endurance in the Civil War South. Ronald Eric Platt and Holly Foster, General Editors. University Press of Mississippi, Spring 2021
  • Holmes, Don. “a clever fellow”: The Subversive Trickster in The Narrative of Lunsford Lane (forthcoming in North Carolina Literary Review)
  • Holmes, Don. “Silent Sam: Geographic Marker of Violence, Politics, and the Racialized.” Lift Institute, https://www.liftinstitute.org/news/

Book Reviews:


Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

2015, MA English, The Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies at The University of Alabama

2013, BA English, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature and the history of medicine. Her research interests include patient-caregiver exchanges, performances of care, and the material experiences of illness. She is more broadly interested in early modern approaches to human bodies (“be they alive or dead”) and the senses.

Her most recent presentations explore the role of the physician in Donne’s Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions the relationship between of olfaction and practices of reading in the sixteenth century.

Fowler is also interested in the medical humanities more generally and has a background in health sciences writing from her time as an editor and writer with The University of Alabama’s Institute for Rural Health Research.

She completed her master’s thesis, “They are gone to read upon me:” The Donnean Body-Text, with the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance studies.


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Remetir is a doctoral student at UNC Chapel Hill writing about transpacific migration, coloniality, and gender.


Awards

  • Travel Award to attend El Mundo Zurdo Conference, 2018 (Initiative for Minority Excellence)
  • Foreign Language Area Studies Fellowship recipient to attend summer intensive program in Filipino, 2018 (Department of U.S. Education)
  • Migration Fellow, Representing Migrations Humanities Lab, 2018 (Duke University)
  • Travel Award to attend UNC-KCL Configurations of Empire conference at King’s College London, 2017 (Institute for Arts and Humanities)
  • SEASSI Scholarship for language study, 2017 (University of Wisconsin-Madison)
  • Future Faculty Fellow, 2017 (UNC)
  • Fulbright Teaching Assistant in the Czech Republic, 2012-2013 (U.S. Department of Education)

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

Sejal Mahendru is a Ph.D. student at UNC-Chapel Hill with an interest in postcolonial studies and ecocriticism. Her research focuses on the environmental and geopolitical implications of nuclear warfare and their representation in literature. She has also taught at the University of Delhi, and her MPhil dissertation was on contemporary American Theatre.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Travis Townley Alexander

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English and Plan II Honors, The University of Texas at Austin

Bio

Travis is broadly invested in postwar American fiction, film, and visual art. His research specifically clusters around portrayals of the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the 1980s to the present in literary, filmic, and theoretical domains. Travis is particularly interested in the extent to which scripts governing racial representation inform these portrayals.


Publications:

  • “Immunity’s Racial Empire: Virality, Melancholy, Whiteness,” American Literature (revised and resubmitted)
  • “Speaking Fees: Capital, Colony, and Reference in China Mieville’s Embassytown.” LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory1 (forthcoming 2020)
  • “‘A hint of industrial espionage in the eye’: Orientalism, Essayism, and the Politics of Memory in Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video1 (2019): 42 – 61.
  • “Long Live the Old Flesh: AIDS and the Americans with Disabilities Act at Quarter Century.” symplokē1-2 (December 2018): 251 – 266.
  • “Deregulating Grief: A Review of Dagmawi Woubshet’s The Calendar of Loss: Race, Sexuality and Mourning in the Early Era of AIDS,” boundary 2, 2016

Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, Spring 2017


Awards

Short Term Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2019

Summer Research Grant, Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Graduate Student Research Award, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Dean’s Distinguished Graduate, College of Liberal Arts (12 students chosen from 2,983 graduates), The University of Texas at Austin, 2013


Tyler Bunzey

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English with Teaching Licensure, Liberty University

Bio

I study hip-hop and African-American literature post-1940, particularly how hip-hop’s compositional processes work within the spectrum of orality and literacy. I also write about religion and hip-hop inflected through post-secular theory with a focus on evangelicalism and contemporary mainstream hip-hop.


Publications:

  • “New Rhymes Over An Old Beat: A Review of Break Beats in the Bronx” (NewBlackMan In Exile, 2017, URL: http://www.newblackmaninexile.net/2017/11/new-rhymes-over-old-beat-review-of.html)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests include twentieth-century American literature, women’s and gender studies, queer of color critique, and animal studies. She has completed two peer-reviewed publications: one explores Black feminist theories of embodiment and nature in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, forthcoming from Society & Animals; and the other offers an archival analysis of Zora Neale Hurston’s brief tenure at UNC and NCCU, published by North Carolina Literary Review in May 2020. Rachel also co-directs the graduate working group Literature, Medicine and Culture Colloquium (LMCC) which explores topics in health humanities. Finally, Rachel regularly teaches courses in rhetoric and composition, LGBTQIA+ literature and culture, and the history of horror literature and cinema. She is currently working on her dissertation, a literary and cultural history of female masculinity in American modernism.

 


Publications:

“Zora Neale Hurston in North Carolina: Drama, Education, and Contemporary Activism.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 29, August 2020.

“‘A Winged but Grounded Bird’: Morrison’s Mixed Treatment of Animality in The Bluest Eye.” Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies. (forthcoming spring 2021)

“A Crisis in (Female) Masculinity: My Ántonia & the Imaginative Recreation of the Western Frontier.” The Routledge Companion to Masculinity in American Literature and Culture, edited by Lydia Cooper and Joana Conings. (forthcoming spring 2021)

““The Poems and the Dances of the Shades’: Destabilizing Psychological Theories of Grief in The Year of Magical Thinking.” Death Within the Text: Social, Philosophical and Aesthetic Approaches to Literature, edited by Adriana Teodorescu (2018): 10-27.


Awards

Eliason Dissertation Summer Research Fellowship, 2020

MLA COVID-19 Emergency Grant, Modern Language Association, 2020

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2020

Paul Green Prize, North Carolina Literary Review, 2019

Student Learning Circle Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2019

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2018

Deborah W. Shelton Endowment for Graduate Travel Awards, ECL Department, 2018

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2017

Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Awards Fund, 2016

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2016


emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

  • 2017, BA Critical Studies in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2017, BA Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century hemispheric experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX exploration of the sonics and optics of our contemporary American Landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • Latina/o Studies Teaching Grant – 2020

Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow