Travis Townley Alexander

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2013, BA English and Plan II Honors, The University of Texas at Austin

Bio

Travis is broadly invested in postwar American fiction, film, and visual art. His research specifically clusters around portrayals of the HIV/AIDS epidemic from the 1980s to the present in literary, filmic, and theoretical domains. Travis is particularly interested in the extent to which scripts governing racial representation inform these portrayals.


Publications:

  • “Immunity’s Racial Empire: Virality, Melancholy, Whiteness,” American Literature (revised and resubmitted)
  • “Speaking Fees: Capital, Colony, and Reference in China Mieville’s Embassytown.” LIT: Literature, Interpretation, Theory1 (forthcoming 2020)
  • “‘A hint of industrial espionage in the eye’: Orientalism, Essayism, and the Politics of Memory in Chris Marker’s Sans Soleil.” Quarterly Review of Film and Video1 (2019): 42 – 61.
  • “Long Live the Old Flesh: AIDS and the Americans with Disabilities Act at Quarter Century.” symplokē1-2 (December 2018): 251 – 266.
  • “Deregulating Grief: A Review of Dagmawi Woubshet’s The Calendar of Loss: Race, Sexuality and Mourning in the Early Era of AIDS,” boundary 2, 2016

Teaching Awards

Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, Spring 2017


Awards

Short Term Fellowship, The Huntington Library, 2019

Summer Research Grant, Provost’s Committee on LGBTQ Life, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Graduate Student Research Award, Program in Sexuality Studies, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2018

Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, Department of English, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2015

Dean’s Distinguished Graduate, College of Liberal Arts (12 students chosen from 2,983 graduates), The University of Texas at Austin, 2013


Andrew Kim

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and Piano Performance, Lawrence University

Bio

Andrew Kim is a third-year doctoral student with interests in contemporary transnational literature and film, East Asian studies, critical race studies, and postcolonial studies.


Publications:

Looking Back on Colonial Korea: Nostalgia and Anti-Nostalgia in Park Chan-wook’s The Handmaiden, Journal of Commonwealth and Postcolonial Studies, forthcoming early 2019


Tyler Bunzey

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English with Teaching Licensure, Liberty University

Bio

I study hip-hop and African-American literature post-1940, particularly how hip-hop’s compositional processes work within the spectrum of orality and literacy. I also write about religion and hip-hop inflected through post-secular theory with a focus on evangelicalism and contemporary mainstream hip-hop.


Publications:

  • “New Rhymes Over An Old Beat: A Review of Break Beats in the Bronx” (NewBlackMan In Exile, 2017, URL: http://www.newblackmaninexile.net/2017/11/new-rhymes-over-old-beat-review-of.html)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017 BA English & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio jesús taiveaho peláez is a PhD. candidate through the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. Emilio’s dissertation, Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric, probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas as expressed in the work of figures such as José Martí, Federico García Lorca, Allen Ginsberg, and Nestor Perlongher. As a practicing poet, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the recipient of a Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship for 2019-2020. Dwight works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on Ethnic Literatures and Critical Race Theory. His current research focuses on minoritarian identity and conceptions/rhetorics of change in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, speculative fiction, environmental humanism, and drama and performance theory.


Publications:

  • Refereed Journal Article
    • 2019  “‘She Forgot’: Obscuring White Privilege and Colorblindness in Harper Lee’s Novels” South Atlantic Review. 84.1 (March 2019): 54-71.
  • Book Review
    •  2020  Review of Beth Lew Williams. The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America. Harvard University Press,  2018. In Journal of Asian American Studies (2020). Forthcoming February 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)

Awards

  • 2019-20  Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
  • 2019   Graduate Tuition Incentive Scholarship, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019  Graduate Student International Travel Grant, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Kenan Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Summer Dissertation Research Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2018  Baxter Grant, American Studies Association
  • 2018  CSA Travel Grant, Center for the Study of the American South, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017  Institute for the Arts and Humanities Collaboration Grant, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
  • 2015  Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2013  Booker Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature

Eric Meckley

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, M. Div., Duke University

2007, BA Fundamentals: Issues and Texts, University of Chicago

Bio

Eric studies 19th and early 20th Century American Literature with a particular focus on Civil War literature and its impact on American cultural identity. He is also interested in the intersections of race, religion, and empire.


Publications:

  • What’s in a name? Racial Transparency and the Jazz-Age in “Hills Like White Elephants”, The Hemingway Review, Fall 2018.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Caroline Porter

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English Language and Literature, University of South Carolina

2015, MA English Literary and Literary Theory, University of Kansas

Bio

I work on Contemporary Multi-Ethnic American Literature, critical race theory, space and place/human geography, and feminist theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mark Collins

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2011, B.A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

2012, M.A. History, Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Mark Collins is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in the fields of contemporary American and multi-ethnic literature and women’s and gender studies. His academic interests include: feminist theory, science and technology studies, critical race theory, and cultural studies. Mark is currently working on his dissertation project, called “Nuclear Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Reproductive Control in US Cold War Speculative Fiction,” which explores the relationship between the discourses of nuclear warfare and reproduction in literary and cultural texts from the decades spanning the Cold War period.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume