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Carly Schnitzler

October 21, 2018

Degrees

2016, B.A. English modified with Philosophy, minor in Ethics, Dartmouth College

Bio

Carly Schnitzler is a PhD student and teaching fellow studying the intersections of experimental poetics, labor practices, and digital infrastructures.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Emma Duvall

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Emma is a Comparative Literature student interested in ancient Greek philosophy.  Her work explores the relationship between philosophy and poetry in Plato and Aristotle.  She is also interested in language, specifically metaphor and simile.


Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth and twentieth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Books:

Articles:

  • “A ‘Correspondence of Eyes with Eyes’: Edwin Arlington Robinson, Empathy, and Literary Naturalism,” CR: The New Centennial Review, forthcoming.
  • “‘In Couples, In Small Companies’: On Robert Duncan and Sentimental Modernism.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, & Theory, vol. 76, no. 2, Summer 2020, pp. 87-113.
  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, vol. 21, no. 2, June 2019, pp. 83-103.
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I.” Women’s Studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2018, pp. 317-332.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Early Stages Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Summer 2021
  • Bain Award for outstanding academic performance in the second year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Ruth Richardson Award for outstanding academic performance in the first year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2018

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

I am I fourth-year Ph.D. student studying the overlap of friendship, loyalty, and virtue in Late Medieval Romance. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. I like to write, craft, sing, travel, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, and bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”).


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Taras Vladimirovich Mikhailiuk

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2011, B. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

2013, M. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

Bio

My research focuses on the unsayable in British Romantic poetry, particularly in the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. I am interested in examining how philosophical, social, and political concerns underscore uses of the unsayable at the level of grammar and poetic diction. I also serve as an Assistant Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal.


Publications:

  • David Biespiel, The Education of a Young Poet (Berkeley: Counterpoint Press, 2017), reviewed for Carolina Quarterly. May 10, 2018
  • Audrey Wasser, The Work of Difference: Modernism, Romanticism, and the Production of Literary Form (New York: Fordham University Press, 2016), reviewed for Comparative Literature Studies, (forthcoming)
  • A Short Story: Interspersed with Poetry; What You Please, Or, Memoirs of Modern Characters; The Forest of St. Bernardo; The Monk’s Daughter; Or, Hypocrisy Punished; The Maiden Wife; Or, Heiress of De Coursey, entries for The Cambridge Guide to Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660–1820,(forthcoming in 2020)

Teaching Awards

  • College of Education Outstanding Student Teacher, Middle Tennessee State University, 2011

Awards

  • The William R. Wolfe Graduate Writing Award (Honorable Mention), Middle Tennessee State University, 2012
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Graduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2011
  • ETS Recognition of Excellence (PRAXIS), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Martha Hixon Creative Expression Award (First Place, Poetry), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Undergraduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2009

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

  • 2017, BA Critical Studies in English Cultures, Literatures, and Film, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire
  • 2017, BA Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio Jesús Taiveaho Peláez is a first-generation migrant and a PhD. student—in that order—through the Department of English & Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. As both poet and scholar, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry. Focusing on 20th-century hemispheric experimental poetry, their dissertation (tentatively titled Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric) probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas through the lens of Neobaroque aesthetics, tracing dissonant and dissident relations in the life and work of figures such as Federico García Lorca, Langston Hughes, Allen Ginsberg, Néstor Perlongher, and Cecilia Vicuña. emilio’s first book of poetry, landskips (words are a hard look), a latinX exploration of the sonics and optics of our contemporary American Landscapes, is forthcoming through The Concern Newsstand.


Publications:


Teaching Awards

  • Latina/o Studies Teaching Grant – 2020

Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Eric Bontempo

April 20, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and French, Harding University

2017, MA English, University of Arkansas at Fayetteville

Bio

Eric Bontempo is a third-year PhD student and Graduate Teaching Fellow in the Department of English & Comparative Literature. His interests include nineteenth-century poetics, British Romanticism, aesthetic theory, and postsecular studies.


Publications:

  • “In Memoriam:  Reader-Response and the Virtual Construction of Consolation.” The International Journal of Critical Cultural Studies, vol. 14. no. 4 (2016), pp. 11-18.

Awards

  • UNC Center for Global Initiatives REACH Fellow, Summer 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems,” Literature and Belief 37.2, 2017. 45-61.

“Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry,” The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes. Winter 2016-17.

Reference Article

“Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake,” in Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, ed. Professor April London (Cambridge University Press), forthcoming.


Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin J. Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania with a BA in English and German and a creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My dissertation, “Royal Democrats: American Dignity and the Aristocratic Impulse,” traces the nineteenth-century development of the concept of “dignity” from its origins in aristocratic exclusivity to its later association with democratic equality. I argue that a racialized logic of rank and status remains a central component of this process and underlies how many Americans conceptualize democracy. By recognizing the instability and uneven development of American ideas of dignity and democracy, we can better understand why they remain such important yet contested concepts in U.S. politics today.


Publications:

  • “‘To continue their illustrious breed’: Aristocracy, Democracy, and the Search for Dignity in The House of the Seven Gables.The Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, vol. 47 (Fall 2021). Forthcoming.
  • “Digging Up Emerson’s Garden: Competing Notions of Transcendentalist Temporality in The Dial,” American Notes and Queries (2021). Forthcoming in print. Online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0895769X.2021.1933372.
  • Review of The Introspective Art of Mark Twain by Douglas Anderson. American Literary Realism, vol. 51, no. 2 (Winter 2019), pp. 187-188.
  • “Nature in American Realism and Romanticism and the Problem with Genre.” Valley Humanities Review, vol. 6 (Spring 2015).

Awards

  • The Dr. Nancy C. Joyner Summer Research Fellowship, Graduate School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2021)
  • Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Professional Development Award, Writing Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Roy C. Moose Graduate Student Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2017, 2018)
  • Agnes Boyle O’Donnell Literature Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)
  • The Dr. George R. Struble Memorial Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume