Emma Duvall

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA Liberal Arts, Sarah Lawrence College

Bio

Emma is a Comparative Literature student interested in ancient Greek philosophy.  Her work explores the relationship between philosophy and poetry in Plato and Aristotle.  She is also interested in language, specifically metaphor and simile.


Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Articles

  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading,” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies (forthcoming)
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I,” Women’s Studies, Vol. 47: Issue 3, 317-332, 2018.
  • “Reformatted / Re-fleshed: Gender, the Internet and New Configurations for Embodiment.” Criterion: A Journal of Literary Criticism: Vol. 7: No. 1, 2014.

Reviews

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Ruth Richardson Award for Outstanding Academic Performance in the First Year of Graduate Study, 2018

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

As a Ph.D. student, I study Medieval and Early Modern British literature, but my interests vary widely. I like the Classics, Romanticism, folklore, Gothic, Neo-Gothic, Dystopian, Fantasy, Sci-Fi, and fairytale retellings. I’m particularly interested in the overlap between cultures and time periods, such as Anglo-French interactions, medieval themes reflected in contemporary work, or the transitional periods between arbitrary temporal divisions. In past research projects, I have traced heroes, examined loyalty, and explored and experienced the sublime in literature and in real life, such as paragliding through clouds over the French Alps, where I worked this summer as an au pair. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. In my free time, I write, craft, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”), sing, and travel.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Taras Vladimirovich Mikhailiuk

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2011, B. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

2013, M. A. English, Middle Tennessee State University

Bio

My research focuses on the unsayable in British Romantic poetry, particularly in the works of Percy Bysshe Shelley. I am interested in examining how philosophical, social, and political concerns underscore uses of the unsayable at the level of grammar and poetic diction. I also serve as an Assistant Editor of the Keats-Shelley Journal.


Publications:

  • David Biespiel, The Education of a Young Poet (Berkeley: Counterpoint Press, 2017), reviewed for Carolina Quarterly. May 10, 2018
  • Audrey Wasser, The Work of Difference: Modernism, Romanticism, and the Production of Literary Form (New York: Fordham University Press, 2016), reviewed for Comparative Literature Studies, (forthcoming)
  • A Short Story: Interspersed with Poetry; What You Please, Or, Memoirs of Modern Characters; The Forest of St. Bernardo; The Monk’s Daughter; Or, Hypocrisy Punished; The Maiden Wife; Or, Heiress of De Coursey, entries for The Cambridge Guide to Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660–1820,(forthcoming in 2020)

Teaching Awards

  • College of Education Outstanding Student Teacher, Middle Tennessee State University, 2011

Awards

  • The William R. Wolfe Graduate Writing Award (Honorable Mention), Middle Tennessee State University, 2012
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Graduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2011
  • ETS Recognition of Excellence (PRAXIS), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Martha Hixon Creative Expression Award (First Place, Poetry), Middle Tennessee State University, 2010
  • Richard C. and Virginia Peck Award (Undergraduate), Middle Tennessee State University, 2009

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

Nikki Roulo’s research focuses primarily upon early modern literature. In particular, she is interested in the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, who bridges both genres, and ballads and music within early modern texts.


Publications:

  • “Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. 206 pp. $104.95 ISBN: 9781472458322.” In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018).
  • “Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. 385 pp. $40.00 ISBN: 9780226415970.” In Journal of Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018).

Awards

  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology

Tyler Bunzey

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English with Teaching Licensure, Liberty University

Bio

I study hip-hop and African-American literature post-1940, particularly how hip-hop’s compositional processes work within the spectrum of orality and literacy. I also write about religion and hip-hop inflected through post-secular theory with a focus on evangelicalism and contemporary mainstream hip-hop.


Publications:

  • “New Rhymes Over An Old Beat: A Review of Break Beats in the Bronx” (NewBlackMan In Exile, 2017, URL: http://www.newblackmaninexile.net/2017/11/new-rhymes-over-old-beat-review-of.html)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rebecca Rae Garonzik

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2009, MA Comparative Literature, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2005, BA Spanish, Goucher College

Bio

Rebecca Garonzik is a doctoral candidate in Comparative Literature. Her areas of specialization are twentieth and twenty-first century Latin American and Latinx literatures. She is currently completing her dissertation, “Eros Galvanized: Critical Intersections of Eroticism and Politics in Contemporary Latin American and Latina/o/x Literatures (1965-2011),” under the direction of Juan Carlos González Espitia. In addition to her research on socially committed literature, Rebecca has also published work on poetics and Foucauldian discourse analysis. She is the founding co-president of the Literatures of the Americas working group.


Publications:

  • “Beyond Marcuse: Guevara’s Influence on the Revolutionary Erotic in Julio Cortázar’s Libro de Manuel.” A Contracorriente 13.2 (Winter 2016): 1-24. Web. 8 March 2016.
  • “Deconstructing Psychiatric Discourse and Idealized Madness in Cristina Rivera Garza’s Nadie me verá llorar.” Chasqui: Revista de Literatura Latinoamericana 43.1 (May 2014): 3-14.
  • “‘To name that thing without a name’: Linking Poetry and the Child’s Voice in Sandra   Cisneros’s The House on Mango Street.” Letras Femeninas 37.2 (Winter 2011): 139-55.
  • “Queering Feminism: Cristina Rivera Garza’s La cresta de Ilión and the Feminine Sublime.” Cuaderno Internacional de Estudios Humanísticos y Literatura 14 (Fall 2010): 45-56.
  • “Permanencias de Juan Rulfo en la crítica contemporánea.” Rev. of Ecos y murmullos en la obra de Rulfo, Ed. Julio Moguel and Enrique Sáinz. Confluencia 24.2 (Spring 2009): 151-53.

Awards

  • Frankel Dissertation Fellowship
  • Phi Beta Kappa
  • Helen Carroll Shelley Prize in Romance Languages

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Christina Choon Ling Lee

April 23, 2018

Degrees

MA English, York University

BA English (Honors), University of Alberta

BA Music, University of Alberta

Bio

Christina Lee is a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation, tentatively titled “Towards a Language of Therapoetics” constructs a language of therapeutic recovery from trauma through investigations of the late nineteenth-century writings of Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Herman Melville, and Emily Dickinson.


Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017 BA English & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio jesús taiveaho peláez is a PhD. candidate through the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. Emilio’s dissertation, Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric, probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas as expressed in the work of figures such as José Martí, Federico García Lorca, Allen Ginsberg, and Nestor Perlongher. As a practicing poet, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Kristján Hannesson

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2011, MA Comparative Literature, University of Iceland

2008, BA Comparative Literature, University of Iceland

Bio

Kristjan studies Renaissance comic literature and its role in thinking through problems of grace and cultural continuity in the Renaissance.