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Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, UNC Chancellor’s Awards, Spring 2021
  • Erika Lindemann Award for Demonstrated Excellence in Teaching, UNC English and Comparative Literature Department, Spring 2020
  • Professional Development Award, UNC Writing Program, Fall 2018-Spring 2021

Awards

  • Dean’s Fellowship, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Spring 2022
  • Off-Campus Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, Spring 2020
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Research Grant, UNC MEMS, Spring 2020
  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, Spring 2020
  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, UNC MEMS, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian S. Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature, primarily drama placed in its religiopolitical and material contexts. His research interests include the histories of religion and emotion, occult knowledge, and literary representations of the Devil. His most recent publication places William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in its contemporary religious and scientific contexts by exploring the toxicological roles of night, crypts, and demons in the play. He has previously delivered papers on the Devil and humor in Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass, Paracelsianism in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and medieval theories of predestination in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Smith’s current project interrogates the relationship between the reception of Calvinist doctrine and “horror” as an affect in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century tragedy, epic, and sermons.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Forthcoming. “‘No healthsome air breathes in’: Spiritual Poison in Romeo and Juliet,” Poison on the Early Modern Stage, edited by Lisa Hopkins and Kibrina Davey (Manchester University Press).

Media & Impact

Curatorial Work


Awards

  • ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Eating through the Archives: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Modern Foodways Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, December 2019
  • Sara Malone Conference Grant, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, May 2019
  • Florence Hoagland Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior English Major, Bethany College Department of Humanities, Spring 2015
  • W. F. Kennedy Prize for Outstanding Junior Man, Bethany College, Spring 2014
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Junior English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2014
  • Bettie Blanck Travel Award, BC Department of Humanities, Fall 2013
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Sophomore English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Montgomery

September 11, 2018

Degrees

2018, BA English, University of Tulsa

Bio

I am I fourth-year Ph.D. student studying the overlap of friendship, loyalty, and virtue in Late Medieval Romance. I have studied French, Latin, some Old-English, and beginning Gaelic. I want to learn Italian, German, Norwegian, and possibly many more languages. I like to write, craft, sing, travel, watch and collect Disney and Marvel movies, and bake (my superlative in my undergraduate writing club was “most likely to be held hostage for her brownie recipe”).


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Erik Maloney

July 27, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA in English and Comparative Literature, summa cum laude, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

My research focuses on exchanges among literature, science, philosophy, and theology in early modern Europe.


Awards

  • 2016-17, North Carolina Native American Incentive Grant
  • 2016-17, Ruth Rose Richardson award for the outstanding record in the first year of graduate study

Lanier Walker

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Harvard University

2015, postgraduate study, History of Design, Royal College of Art/ Victoria & Albert Museum

Bio

Lanier’s research interests include early modern drama, material culture, and the history of the book. In her free time, she is an avid baker and printmaker.


Awards

  • Caroline H. and Thomas S. Royster Fellow

Katharine Landers

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My dissertation, entitled Dressing Authority: The Politics of Fashion in English Women’s Writing, 1616-1676, examines resistant discourses of dress in works by Margaret Cavendish, Anne Clifford, Mary Carleton, and others, situating their writings at the interdisciplinary nexus of the history of dress and seventeenth-century political theory. I argue that sartorial-political speech underscores the limits of Royalist/Stuart politics, responding with alternative sites of local, aristocratic, and non-legislative political power. I consider diverse representations of dress, from locally-produced textiles to spectacular widow ensembles to possibly-counterfeit jewels, showing how apparel advances loyal-but-resistant political agendas for seventeenth-century women.


Publications:

  • “Visualizing the Widow Self: Politics, Agency, and Androgyny in Lady Anne Clifford’s Great Picture.” Clio: a Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 48, no. 1. Forthcoming, 2020.
  • “‘A veil of obscure mourning’: Widowhood Dress and Political Authority in Margaret Cavendish’s Bell in Campo and True Relation.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 51, no. 2. Forthcoming, 2021.
  • “‘Political ‘Modes’: Resistant Fashion in Cavendish, Hutchinson, and Evelyn.” English Literary Renaissance. Special issue, ed. Julie Crawford. Expected 2023. (Under review)
  • “Women and Fashion in Print,” ed. Katherine Acheson, The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing, general editors Patricia Pender and Rosalind Smith. (London: Palgrave, under review).
  • “‘A Serving-Man to become a Queen’: Digitized Woodcuts and the Gender/Class Slide in ‘The Famous Flower of Serving-Men.’” Early Modern Criticism and Politics in a Time of Crisis, ed. Patricia Palmer and David Baker Santa Barbara: EMC Imprint. Forthcoming 2020.
  • Anne Clifford.” Coauthored with Megan Matchinske. In Oxford Bibliographies (obo), “Renaissance and Reformation,” (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020).
  • Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance.” Coauthored with David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich. Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: EMC Imprint, 2018).

Awards

  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Research Travel Grant, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Shakespeare Association of America Graduate Student Travel Grant (2019)
  • Dorothy Ford Wiley Visiting Professor Dissertation Workshop, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2018)
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid (2017)
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for the Outstanding Record in the First Year of Study, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2015)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Ani Govjian

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, University of California Irvine
2007, BA English, Loyola Marymount University

Bio

I study medieval and early modern literature because it is wild, interesting, weird, and fun. My dissertation, “Tricks of Faith: Trickery as Jest, Test, Experiment, and Corrective in Early Modern English Literature,” focuses on the representation of scientific thinking as it intersects with religious experience on the English stage. As an educator, I bring a little bit of the magical, early modern past into the classroom by teaming up with UNC’s Wilson Rare Book Library and the Ackland Art museum for immersive student projects. I also work as a project assistant for the Blake Archive where I get to generate xml mark-up for some truly captivating William Blake illustrations.


Teaching Awards

  • James R. Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching Composition, 2016-2017
  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2016-2017
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, Center for Faculty Excellence, Fall 2017
  • UNC Writing Program Professional Engagement & Pedagogy Award, 2015-2016

Awards

  • Off-Campus Dissertation Research Fellowship, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Paleography Seminar taught by Dr. Heather Wolfe, 2017
  • Department of English and Comparative Literature Departmental Research Fellowship, Summer 2017
  • Chi-Jung Chu Memorial Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Seminar Fellowship, “Researching the Archive,” taught by Dr. Keith Wrightson and Dr. James Siemon, 2016-2017
  • Medieval & Early Modern Studies Center travel Grant, Fall 2013, Fall 2016, Spring 2017, Fall 2017
  • Chapel Hill Medieval & Early Modern Studies Center Graduate Recruitment Award, 2012-2013
  • University of California Irvine – MA Thesis Distinction Award, 2012

Curriculum Vitae / Resume