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Thomas Eric Simonson

September 18, 2019

Degrees

2019, MA in English, Wake Forest University

2017, BA in English, University of North Carolina at Charlotte

Bio

Thomas Eric Simonson divides his time between literature of the early modern era, especially drama, and 20th century transatlantic studies and literary theory.


Theodore Nollert

September 11, 2019
Photo of Theodore Nollert

Degrees

2016, BA English, Rhodes College

2019, MA English, University of Alabama

Bio

I specialize in literature, religion, and politics from 1550-1640, with expertise in lyric, dramatic, and narrative poetry from Chaucer to Milton (including Shakespeare). In addition to secondary competency in literary prose from 1500-1800, and special familiarity with the work of Laurence Sterne, I have taught courses on literature for primary and secondary schools, universities, continuing education programs, and correctional education programs. 

My dissertation will evaluate the political gist of English literary depictions of Julius Caesar in the context of more radical political theory


Awards

Mellon Fellowship (2019-2024)
Ruth Rose Richardson Award (2020)


David Hall

August 23, 2019

Degrees

2018, BA English & Computer Science, University of Virginia

Bio

The focus of my studies in the English Department is on video games and understanding how stories get told in this new, developing medium. I am particularly interested in questions of agency, empathy, and virtuality in video game narratives, and how these questions provide interesting and useful lenses outside of the video game medium. I also work on questions of legitimacy and pedagogy surrounding games, and how the physical space of gameplay is important to the inclusion of video games into the academic sphere.


Awards

  • 2019 Center for Faculty Excellence – Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant

Emily Youree

August 12, 2019
Photo of Emily Youree, taken by Katherine Stein

Degrees

2019, BA English, Samford University

Bio

Emily is a PhD candidate focusing on late-medieval Middle English literature. She is especially interested in questions of authority, counter-authority, legality, and outlawry in late fourteenth and early fifteenth century political poetry and outlaw tales, including Piers Plowman, texts in the Piers Plowman tradition, and Robin Hood traditions.


Awards

  • 2022 Joseph Breen Award for Outstanding Work in the Field of Medieval Studies
  • 2021 ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant
  • 2020 Joseph Breen Award for Outstanding Work in the Field of Medieval Studies

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mandy L. Fowler

February 14, 2019

Degrees

2015, MA English, The Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance Studies at The University of Alabama

2013, BA English, Angelo State University

Bio

Mandy L. Fowler is a PhD student specializing in early modern literature and the history of medicine. Her research interests include patient-caregiver exchanges, performances of care, and the material experiences of illness. She is more broadly interested in early modern approaches to human bodies (“be they alive or dead”) and the senses.

Her most recent presentations explore the role of the physician in Donne’s Devotions Upon Emergent Occasions the relationship between of olfaction and practices of reading in the sixteenth century.

Fowler is also interested in the medical humanities more generally and has a background in health sciences writing from her time as an editor and writer with The University of Alabama’s Institute for Rural Health Research.

She completed her master’s thesis, “They are gone to read upon me:” The Donnean Body-Text, with the Hudson Strode Program in Renaissance studies.


Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, UNC Chancellor’s Awards, Spring 2021
  • Erika Lindemann Award for Demonstrated Excellence in Teaching, UNC English and Comparative Literature Department, Spring 2020
  • Professional Development Award, UNC Writing Program, Fall 2018-Spring 2021

Awards

  • Dean’s Fellowship, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Spring 2022
  • Off-Campus Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, Spring 2020
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Research Grant, UNC MEMS, Spring 2020
  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, Spring 2020
  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, UNC MEMS, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Khristian Smith

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English Literature, University of Virginia

2015, BA English Literature, Bethany College

Bio

Khristian S. Smith studies late medieval and early modern literature, primarily drama placed in its religiopolitical and material contexts. His research interests include the histories of religion and emotion, occult knowledge, and literary representations of the Devil. His most recent publication places William Shakespeare’s Romeo and Juliet in its contemporary religious and scientific contexts by exploring the toxicological roles of night, crypts, and demons in the play. He has previously delivered papers on the Devil and humor in Ben Jonson’s The Devil is an Ass, Paracelsianism in Shakespeare’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, and medieval theories of predestination in Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde. Smith’s current project interrogates the relationship between the reception of Calvinist doctrine and “horror” as an affect in sixteenth- and seventeenth-century tragedy, epic, and sermons.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Articles

  • Forthcoming. “‘No healthsome air breathes in’: Spiritual Poison in Romeo and Juliet,” Poison on the Early Modern Stage, edited by Lisa Hopkins and Kibrina Davey (Manchester University Press).

Media & Impact

Curatorial Work


Awards

  • ARPA Graduate Degree Completion Grant, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Eating through the Archives: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Early Modern Foodways Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, December 2019
  • Sara Malone Conference Grant, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, May 2019
  • Florence Hoagland Memorial Award for Outstanding Senior English Major, Bethany College Department of Humanities, Spring 2015
  • W. F. Kennedy Prize for Outstanding Junior Man, Bethany College, Spring 2014
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Junior English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2014
  • Bettie Blanck Travel Award, BC Department of Humanities, Fall 2013
  • Cammie Pendleton Award for Outstanding Sophomore English Major, BC Department of Humanities, Spring 2013

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Erik Maloney

July 27, 2018

Degrees

2016, BA in English and Comparative Literature, summa cum laude, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Bio

My research focuses on exchanges among literature, science, philosophy, and theology in early modern Europe.


Awards

  • 2016-17, North Carolina Native American Incentive Grant
  • 2016-17, Ruth Rose Richardson award for the outstanding record in the first year of graduate study