Journal Highlights Digital Pedagogy by Professor Daniel Anderson and English Minor Emily Shepherd

I Lit EPortfolio

The Journal of Interactive Technology & Pedagogy has highlighted Daniel Anderson and Emily Shepherd's ePortfolio, which curates student examples within a framework of theory and context, in its most recent issue. According to the editor, their submission I Lit: An E-Poetry, E-Portfolio Exhibit, "provides an example of the kind of scholarship we hope to see more of at JITP, i.e. scholarship that leverages the affordances of technology to present its theses, analyses and evidences more effectively."  For a full-screen experience, and more information about this exciting project, please see http://ilit.altscholarship.com/.

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Prof. Jessica Wolfe to discuss "Ironic epithets in Renaissance literature" at international colloquium in Rome

Jessica Wolfe is the sole American scholar to participate in an international colloquium, "Homer in Europe / Omero in Europa," to be held in Rome on 23-25 November 2016, at the Institut Nederlandais of Rome and at the Palazzo Spada. She will be speaking (in French) on "Ironic epithets in Renaissance literature," a paper drawn from materials related to her 2015 book on the reception of Homer in the European Renaissance. 

Program information is available here (in French and Italian).

Jessica Wolfe is a Professor in the English and Comparative Literature Department, the Director of the Program in Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS), and the Director of the Program in Comparative Literature.

Prof. Heidi Kim discusses "Taken from the Paradise Isle" at DENSHO

Heidi Kim, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature, was a participant in the inaugural Scholars’ Roundtable hosted by Densho: The Japanese American Legacy Project in Seattle, Washington. She and other prominent scholars of the Japanese American incarceration during World War II (including Prof. Eric Muller of UNC Law School) discussed their recently published works (including Kim’s Taken from the Paradise Isle, UP Colorado, 2015), current work, the challenges and opposition that this field of study faces, and future directions.

Heidi Kim, Associate Professor of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina, presents new work at the Densho Scholar Roundtable. Photo and caption provided by DENSHO.

“It was a privilege to participate in this roundtable,” said Prof. Kim. “I was energized by hearing about the amazing work of my fellow scholars, and we also learned a lot from the archivists’ meeting that ran simultaneously. I came away with new ideas for my own work and for teaching and public engagement, which we all agree is crucial for this major event in civil rights history.”

Densho, the hosting organization, is a grassroots public history nonprofit that maintains extensive digital collections and educational materials on the incarceration of Japanese Americans.

 

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SAMLA Awards Dr. Jennifer Ho the 2016 Monograph of the Year Award

 

 The South Atlantic Modern Language Association (SAMLA) awarded Dr. Jennifer Ho the 2016 Monograph of the Year award for her book Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture at their annual conference in Jacksonville, Florida last week.

The book explores "the sheer diversity of the Asian American populace [which] makes them an ambiguous racial category...Exploring a variety of subjects and cultural artifacts, Ho reveals how Asian American subjects evince a deep racial ambiguity that unmoors the concept of race from any fixed or finite understanding. For example, the book examines the racial ambiguity of Japanese American nisei Yoshiko Nakamura deLeon, who during World War II underwent an abrupt transition from being an enemy alien to an assimilating American, via the Mixed Marriage Policy of 1942. It looks at the blogs of Korean, Taiwanese, and Vietnamese Americans who were adopted as children by white American families and have conflicted feelings about their “honorary white” status. And it discusses Tiger Woods, the most famous mixed-race Asian American, whose description of himself as “Cablinasian”—reflecting his background as Black, Asian, Caucasian, and Native American—perfectly captures the ambiguity of racial classifications. Race is an abstraction that we treat as concrete, a construct that reflects only our desires, fears, and anxieties. Jennifer Ho demonstrates in Racial Ambiguity in Asian American Culture that seeing race as ambiguous puts us one step closer to a potential antidote to racism."

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