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Benjamin Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth and twentieth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Books:

Articles:

  • “A ‘Correspondence of Eyes with Eyes’: Edwin Arlington Robinson, Empathy, and Literary Naturalism,” CR: The New Centennial Review, vol. 20, no. 3, December 2020, pp. 179 – 205.
  • “‘In Couples, In Small Companies’: On Robert Duncan and Sentimental Modernism.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, & Theory, vol. 76, no. 2, Summer 2020, pp. 87-113.
  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, vol. 21, no. 2, June 2019, pp. 83-103.
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I.” Women’s Studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2018, pp. 317-332.

Reviews:

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Early Stages Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Summer 2021
  • Bain Award for outstanding academic performance in the second year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Ruth Richardson Award for outstanding academic performance in the first year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2018

Michele Robinson

June 13, 2018

Degrees

2009, BA English, Kenyon College

2011, MA Humanities with English focus, University of Chicago

Bio

Michele Robinson is pursuing a minor in Women’s and Gender studies and her dissertation focuses on the role of space and gender in nineteenth century literature. She has enjoyed teaching courses like English 105, 123 Into to Fiction: Gendered Politics of Madness and Mental Illness, and 129 Literature and Cultural Diversity.


Awards

  • Julius Sylvester Hanner Memorial Fellowship
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Prize

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

  • “Archiving Dracula: Knowledge Acquisition and Interdisciplinarity,” Nineteenth-Century Contexts (forthcoming)

Edited Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor, with Doreen Thierauf, Generational Exchange and Transition in Women’s Writing, special issue of Women’s Writing, vol. 26, no. 2, 2019.

Awards

  • Evan Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests include twentieth-century American literature, women’s and gender studies, queer of color critique, and animal studies. She has completed two peer-reviewed publications: one explores Black feminist theories of embodiment and nature in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, forthcoming from Society & Animals; and the other offers an archival analysis of Zora Neale Hurston’s brief tenure at UNC and NCCU, published by North Carolina Literary Review in May 2020. Rachel also co-directs the graduate working group Literature, Medicine and Culture Colloquium (LMCC) which explores topics in health humanities. Finally, Rachel regularly teaches courses in rhetoric and composition, LGBTQIA+ literature and culture, and the history of horror literature and cinema. She is currently working on her dissertation, a literary and cultural history of female masculinity in American modernism.

 


Publications:

“Zora Neale Hurston in North Carolina: Drama, Education, and Contemporary Activism.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 29, August 2020.

“‘A Winged but Grounded Bird’: Morrison’s Mixed Treatment of Animality in The Bluest Eye.” Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies. (forthcoming spring 2021)

“A Crisis in (Female) Masculinity: My Ántonia & the Imaginative Recreation of the Western Frontier.” The Routledge Companion to Masculinity in American Literature and Culture, edited by Lydia Cooper and Joana Conings. (forthcoming spring 2021)

““The Poems and the Dances of the Shades’: Destabilizing Psychological Theories of Grief in The Year of Magical Thinking.” Death Within the Text: Social, Philosophical and Aesthetic Approaches to Literature, edited by Adriana Teodorescu (2018): 10-27.


Awards

Eliason Dissertation Summer Research Fellowship, 2020

MLA COVID-19 Emergency Grant, Modern Language Association, 2020

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2020

Paul Green Prize, North Carolina Literary Review, 2019

Student Learning Circle Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2019

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2018

Deborah W. Shelton Endowment for Graduate Travel Awards, ECL Department, 2018

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2017

Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Awards Fund, 2016

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2016


Katharine Landers

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My dissertation, entitled Dressing Authority: The Politics of Fashion in English Women’s Writing, 1616-1676, examines resistant discourses of dress in works by Margaret Cavendish, Anne Clifford, Mary Carleton, and others, situating their writings at the interdisciplinary nexus of the history of dress and seventeenth-century political theory. I argue that sartorial-political speech underscores the limits of Royalist/Stuart politics, responding with alternative sites of local, aristocratic, and non-legislative political power. I consider diverse representations of dress, from locally-produced textiles to spectacular widow ensembles to possibly-counterfeit jewels, showing how apparel advances loyal-but-resistant political agendas for seventeenth-century women.


Publications:

  • “Visualizing the Widow Self: Politics, Agency, and Androgyny in Lady Anne Clifford’s Great Picture.” Clio: a Journal of Literature, History, and the Philosophy of History 48, no. 1. Forthcoming, 2020.
  • “‘A veil of obscure mourning’: Widowhood Dress and Political Authority in Margaret Cavendish’s Bell in Campo and True Relation.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal 51, no. 2. Forthcoming, 2021.
  • “‘Political ‘Modes’: Resistant Fashion in Cavendish, Hutchinson, and Evelyn.” English Literary Renaissance. Special issue, ed. Julie Crawford. Expected 2023. (Under review)
  • “Women and Fashion in Print,” ed. Katherine Acheson, The Palgrave Encyclopedia of Early Modern Women’s Writing, general editors Patricia Pender and Rosalind Smith. (London: Palgrave, under review).
  • “‘A Serving-Man to become a Queen’: Digitized Woodcuts and the Gender/Class Slide in ‘The Famous Flower of Serving-Men.’” Early Modern Criticism and Politics in a Time of Crisis, ed. Patricia Palmer and David Baker Santa Barbara: EMC Imprint. Forthcoming 2020.
  • Anne Clifford.” Coauthored with Megan Matchinske. In Oxford Bibliographies (obo), “Renaissance and Reformation,” (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2020).
  • Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance.” Coauthored with David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich. Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: EMC Imprint, 2018).

Awards

  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Research Travel Grant, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Shakespeare Association of America Graduate Student Travel Grant (2019)
  • Dorothy Ford Wiley Visiting Professor Dissertation Workshop, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2018)
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid (2017)
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for the Outstanding Record in the First Year of Study, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2015)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mallory Findlay

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2008, BA English, Emory University

2014, MA English, Georgetown University

Bio

Mallory’s research focuses on American women writers of the mid-nineteenth century, with an emphasis on the ways that romantic love and sexuality destabilize traditional marriage plots.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2016-2017

Contact

email |

Office: Greenlaw 528

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemological mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies but are also foundational to the printing of early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Specialized Composition, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019

Awards

  • Lindemann Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Spring 2020
  • Folger Shakespeare Library, Grant-in-aid, Book Theory Weekend Seminar, taught by Juliet Fleming, 2019
  • Huntington Library, Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow, 2018
  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Year-Long Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish & Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume