Michele Robinson

June 13, 2018

Degrees

2009, BA English, Kenyon College

2011, MA Humanities with English focus, University of Chicago

Bio

Michele Robinson is pursuing a minor in Women’s and Gender studies and her dissertation focuses on the role of space and gender in nineteenth century literature. She has enjoyed teaching courses like English 105, 123 Into to Fiction: Gendered Politics of Madness and Mental Illness, and 129 Literature and Cultural Diversity.


Awards

  • Julius Sylvester Hanner Memorial Fellowship
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Prize

Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

While my interests are varied–from British Modernism to North African Cinema to RPG tabletop and videogames–my current research focuses on gender and sexuality in French and North African Film. While I usually teach French language classes, I also have a background in Women’s and Gender Studies, Global Cinema, Middle Eastern Studies, and Arabic. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian Studies, and African Studies.


Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2018

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

  • Guest editor, with Doreen Thierauf, of a special issue of Women’s Writing on “Generations” (forthcoming 2018)

Awards

  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

Bridget C. Donnelly

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, B.A. English, Lawrence University

Bio

I am a PhD candidate at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, and I specialize in British literature of the long eighteenth century and the history of the novel. My dissertation project considers shifting discourses surrounding accidental events throughout the eighteenth century, framing the analysis around fictional representations of carriage accidents in texts like Tobias Smollett’s Humphry Clinker, Frances Burney’s Evelina, Mary Hays’s Memoirs of Emma Courtney, and Jane Austen’s Love and Friendship. 


Publications:

  • “‘Chequer-Work[s] of Providence’: Skeptical Providentialism in Daniel Defoe’s Fiction.” Philosophy and Literature. Forthcoming.
  • Five entries in The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820. Ed. April London. Cambridge University Press. Forthcoming 2018.

Awards

  • W.M. Keck Foundation Fellowship for research at the Huntington Library, awarded March 2018
  • Huntington Library Travel Grant to the United Kingdom, awarded March 2018
  • Aubrey Williams Research Travel Grant, American Society for 18th-Century Studies, awarded March 2018
  • Jerry Leath Mills/Studies in Philology Travel Award for archival research in England, awarded October 2017
  • Best Graduate Student Paper, International Society for the Study of Narrative, awarded June 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Hannah Palmer

April 23, 2018

Degrees

BA with Honors, English and Spanish, Samford University

Bio

Hannah is a Ph.D. candidate researching the intersections of gender and ethnicity in contemporary Mexican poetry, narrative, and film. Her dissertation examines how writers and artists deploy and/or subvert tropes of oral tradition in order to assert the centrality of Yucatec Maya women in shaping and sustaining a local indigenous culture. In addition to her regular teaching in the Romance Studies department, Hannah has developed courses incorporating Latin American and Latinx literatures, postcolonial literature and theory, and decolonial feminisms. During her time at UNC, she has served as a Lectora Visitante in the Departamento de Literatura Inglesa y Norteamericana at the Universidad de Sevilla and as Resident Director for the UNC-Duke Consortium Yucatec Maya Summer Institute. She currently serves on the executive board of SECOLAS and is a Graduate Program Assistant at the Institute for the Study of the Americas.


Awards

  • Richmond Brown Award for Graduate Student Scholarship, Southeastern Conference of Latin American Studies, 2017
  • Summer Foreign Languages and Area Studies Grant (FLAS), Institute for the Study of the Americas, 2012, 2013, 2014, 2016

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Katharine Landers

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Davidson College

Bio

I am a fourth year PhD student and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on the sartorial politics of women’s writing in England in the 1630’s-1680’s. I am interested in the ways that fashioned representations of clothed bodies, characters, and literary/non-fiction selves are rendered in works by Margaret Cavendish, Lucy Hutchinson, Anne Clifford, and others. I consider how these representations serve as sites for political work, which can include political theorizing, politico-social commentary, and even petitionary action. My most recent work on this project explores how Margaret Cavendish’s plays contrast various forms of fashionable and garment-driven “singularity” to put forth a political theory of right aristocratic and monarchical government after the tumult of the Restoration.

My teaching experience includes work as Teaching Assistant for Professor Mary Floyd-Wilson’s Shakespeare course, a Teaching Fellow for UNC’s English 105: Writing in the Disciplines, and three years of high school teaching experience at Emma Willard School.


Publications:

  • “‘A Serving-Man to become a Queen’: Digitized Woodcuts and the Gender/Class Slide in ‘The Famous Flower of Serving-Men.’” Early Modern Criticism and Politics in a Time of Crisis, ed. Patricia Palmer and David Baker (Santa Barbara: emcIMPRINT, forthcoming).
  • David J. Baker, Travis Alexander, Adam Engel, Katharine Landers, Mary Learner, and Ashley Werlinich, “Dangerous Conjectures’: Ophelia’s Ballad Performance,” Ballads and Performance: The Multi-Modal Stage in Early Modern England, ed. Patricia Fumerton (Santa Barbara: emcIMPRINT, forthcoming).

Awards

  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for the Outstanding Record in the First Year of Study, 2015
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Kenneth Jude Lota

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, University of Virginia

2010, BA English, Tulane University

Bio

Kenneth is a specialist in 20th- and 21st-century American fiction, with interests in genre, film, and the literary moment after postmodernism. His dissertation focuses on the re-invention of the tropes of film noir and hard-boiled crime fiction of the 1930s and 40s in mainstream contemporary American literature. His solo-taught literature classes so far have included a version of the Contemporary Literature class titled “Alternatives to Realism” and a version of the Popular Genres class focused on detective fiction, science fiction, graphic novels, horror, and children’s literature. He managed to successfully teach House of Leaves in a 100-level undergraduate class. In his spare time, he has written reviews of over 1,000 films.


Publications:

  • “Cool Girls and Bad Girls: Reinventing the Femme Fatale in Contemporary American Fiction.” Interdisciplinary Humanities 33.1 (Spring 2016): 150 – 170.

Awards

  • 2017 Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2010 Senior Scholar Award in English, Tulane University

Curriculum Vitae / Resume