Stephanie Kinzinger

July 20, 2018

Degrees

2016, MA English, University of Virginia

2013, BA English, University of California Berkeley

Bio

Stephanie Kinzinger is a third-year PhD student, who focuses on nineteenth-century American literature and science. Her background in both areas of study informs her research on how scientific and technological advancements during the nineteenth century engendered significant shifts in interpreting reality and consequently in writing fiction.


Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the recipient of a Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship for 2019-2020. Dwight works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on Ethnic Literatures and Critical Race Theory. His current research focuses on minoritarian identity and conceptions/rhetorics of change in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, speculative fiction, environmental humanism, and drama and performance theory.


Publications:

  • Refereed Journal Article
    • 2019  “‘She Forgot’: Obscuring White Privilege and Colorblindness in Harper Lee’s Novels” South Atlantic Review. 84.1 (March 2019): 54-71.
  • Book Review
    •  2020  Review of Beth Lew Williams. The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America. Harvard University Press,  2018. In Journal of Asian American Studies (2020). Forthcoming February 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)

Awards

  • 2019-20  Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
  • 2019   Graduate Tuition Incentive Scholarship, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019  Graduate Student International Travel Grant, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Kenan Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Summer Dissertation Research Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2018  Baxter Grant, American Studies Association
  • 2018  CSA Travel Grant, Center for the Study of the American South, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017  Institute for the Arts and Humanities Collaboration Grant, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
  • 2015  Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2013  Booker Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature

Kenneth Jude Lota

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, University of Virginia

2010, BA English, Tulane University

Bio

Kenneth is a specialist in 20th- and 21st-century American fiction, with interests in genre, film, and the literary moment after postmodernism. His dissertation focuses on the re-invention of the tropes of film noir and hard-boiled crime fiction of the 1930s and 40s in mainstream contemporary American literature. His solo-taught literature classes so far have included a version of the Contemporary Literature class titled “Alternatives to Realism” and a version of the Popular Genres class focused on detective fiction, science fiction, graphic novels, horror, and children’s literature. He managed to successfully teach House of Leaves in a 100-level undergraduate class. In his spare time, he has written reviews of over 1,000 films.


Publications:

  • “Cool Girls and Bad Girls: Reinventing the Femme Fatale in Contemporary American Fiction.” Interdisciplinary Humanities 33.1 (Spring 2016): 150 – 170.

Awards

  • 2017 Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2010 Senior Scholar Award in English, Tulane University

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mark Collins

April 19, 2018

Degrees

2011, B.A. Feminist, Gender, and Sexuality Studies, Cornell University

2012, M.A. History, Carnegie Mellon University

Bio

Mark Collins is a PhD student in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He works in the fields of contemporary American and multi-ethnic literature and women’s and gender studies. His academic interests include: feminist theory, science and technology studies, critical race theory, and cultural studies. Mark is currently working on his dissertation project, called “Nuclear Reproduction: Race, Gender, and Reproductive Control in US Cold War Speculative Fiction,” which explores the relationship between the discourses of nuclear warfare and reproduction in literary and cultural texts from the decades spanning the Cold War period.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Elisa Faison

April 10, 2018

Degrees

2011, Bachelor of Arts in English, Sewanee: The University of the South

Bio

Elisa is a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow. She is currently writing a dissertation entitled “Domesticating the Apocalypse: Motherhood and the Novel at the End of Time.”


Publications:

  • Faison, Elisa. Rev. of The Lightkeepers by Abby Geni. Carolina Quarterly 67.1 (Fall/Winter 2017).

Awards

  • Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sean DiLeonardi

April 10, 2018

Degrees

M.A. University of Colorado, Boulder

B.A. Illinois State University

Bio

Sean DiLeonardi teaches and writes broadly about contemporary American literature and its relationship to race, technology, science, and media. Drawing from an interdisciplinary mix of literary criticism, media theory, and science/technology studies, Sean’s research catalogues the effects of new technologies on literary form and, inversely, literary culture’s role in shaping American discourse on race, science, and digitality.

 

Sean is currently preparing a dissertation that traces an epistemological shift in scientific and literary ideas about probability in the American midcentury. The dissertation argues that an array of new media—from digital translators to the first major English translation of the I Ching—automates probability, thus inspiring a set of formal innovations in both scientific and literary narratives. 

 

Chair, 2017-18 Boundaries of Literature Symposium

Co-editor, Ethos Review (http://www.ethosreview.org/)

Co-organizer, the Americanist Speaker Series, in collaboration with Duke English


Publications:

  • “Cryptographic Reading: Machine Translation, the New Criticism, and Nabokov’s Pnin,” Post45: Peer-Reviewed (forthcoming)

Awards

  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship. Dean’s Office, College of Arts and Sciences, 2018-19.
  • Carl Hartsell Award for Teaching Excellence. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2018
  • Research Fellowship. The Graduate School, UNC, Spring 2018.
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship. Carolina Public Humanities, 2017-18.
  • Robert Bain Award. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2016.
  • Digital Media Internship. SITES Laboratory, UNC, 2015-16.
  • Travel Grant. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2014.
  • Travel Grant. United Gov. for Graduate Students, UC Boulder, 2013.
  • Brome Creative Writing Award. English Dept., ISU, 2007.
  • Associated Bank National Scholarship. 2003.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Rory Sullivan

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2017, MA English, University of Virginia

2014, BA English, The College of William and Mary

Bio

Rory Sullivan studies medieval literature, with a focus on the visual and spatial elements of poetry. He is particularly interested in the intersections between literature and the visual arts.


Awards

  • Balch Prize for a Masters Student in English, University of Virginia, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume