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Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Trisha Federis Remetir

November 8, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of California at Berkeley

Bio

Trisha Federis Remetir is a doctoral candidate at UNC Chapel Hill who writes about transpacific migration, representations of water extractions, interspecies entanglements, coloniality, anglophone Filipinx and world literatures, and gender. In her research and teaching methods, she is committed to pushing the boundaries of literary, cultural, and media studies to examine questions of race, gender, and settler logics, while thinking about futures of care, transnational solidarity, and abolition with students.

Trisha’s dissertation, Unfamiliar Waters: Representations of Resource Extraction in the Philippines, 1970s to present, argues that extractive projects in waters in and around the Philippines have altered the composition of water, both on material and representational scales. By examining  examples of water in transnational Filipinx contemporary poetry, 1970s Filipino social realist film, historical archives, and other media, this project pushes against the assumption that the Philippines’ relationship to the Global North is solely defined by extraction of inanimate resources on land (such as oils and minerals)—in fact, this project argues that 20- and 21st century extractive water projects are focusing more on the management of renewable resources and regulating the movement of animate beings (such as human bodies and fish), to the detriment of all. The three chapters, entitled SaltwaterFreshwater, and Storms, each take on three  “types” of water as they were redefined by various moments of resource extraction, such as transnational migration patterns set into place during the Marcos authoritarian regime, movements to nationalize freshwater spaces for aquaculture, and tenuous responses to ever-increasing typhoons. This project makes significant contributions to the  Critical Filipino Studies, Feminist Science and Technology Studies (STS), and media and cultural studies by conversing with scientific archives and artists as they make sense of their changing relationships to water and aquatic life. And lastly, the project contends that Filipino/a/x water aesthetics also challenges extraction’s singular vision of water by uncovering manifold ways of living in relation to water.  In so doing, artists and cultural producers in this study alter water’s cultural and material makeup as well.

Trisha’s forthcoming work can be seen in the edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular culture, and in public digital humanities projects as a 2020 Imagining America PAGE fellow. She has taught courses in digital humanities, world literature, ocean literature, and film.


Publications:

2021                (Forthcoming) “Aquaculture Visions, Techno-Settler Hierarchies, and The Mysterious Milkfish (1982),” edited collection Philippine Studies: Historical and Ethnographic Viewpoints, ed. Paul Michael Atienza and Dr. Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez.

 

2020                (Forthcoming) “National Properties, National Ecologies: Postcolonial and ecocritical engagements with Mikhail Red’s Birdshot (2016),” edited collection Ecologies in Southeast Asian Media and Popular Culture, ed. Dr. Jason Telles and Dr. Charles Ryan.


Teaching Awards

2020

  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

Awards

2021

  • Digital Dissertation Fellowship

2020

  • Chancellor’s Doctoral Candidacy Award
  • Humanities for the Public Good Grant
  • UC Speculative Futures Collective grant
  • Southeast Asian Language Council Tuition Support Award
  • Imagining America Publicly Active Graduate Education (PAGE) Fellow

2019

  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award
  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) fellow
  • Institute of the Arts and Humanities Travel Award
  • Representing Migrations Humanities Lab Fellowship (Duke)

2018

  • Summer Foreign Language Area Studies (FLAS) Fellowship

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Sejal Mahendru

October 9, 2018

Degrees

B.A. English, 2010, University of Delhi

M.A. English, 2012, University of Delhi

M.Phil, English Literature, 2014, University of Delhi

Bio

My research focuses on environmental justice in the Anthropocene. I am interested in the convergences in the fields of ecocriticism, post-colonial theory and global socioeconomics, to examine how the effects of climate change, displacement, toxic and electronic waste, and resource extraction are differentially experienced across the Global North and South. I am also interested reading in environmental advocacy through the the intersections between art and activism in grassroots movements. I study gobal anglophone literature, with a focus on environmental justice movements in India and the U.S.A.


Teaching Awards

  • LSP Graduate Student Affiliate Teaching Award, Fall 2021

Awards

  • Centre for the Studies of the American South Summer Fellowship, 2021

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Che Sokol

April 27, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English and French Literature, University of Tennessee at Chattanooga

Bio

My research focuses on gender, sexuality, and sensuality in the cinemas of the Maghreb and the Maghrebi diaspora in France. I’ve taught a variety of courses, including French, Arabic, film, and queer literature and culture, and I have experience teaching ESL and English composition to non-native speakers. As a Comparative Literature student, I enjoy doing interdisciplinary work through different departments at UNC, including English and Comparative Literature, Romance Studies, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, and African Studies.


Publications:

Book Reviews

  • Sensuous Cinema: The Body in Contemporary Maghrebi Cinema, by Kaya Davies Hayon. Review of Middle East Studies (forthcoming).
  • Maghrebs in Motion: North African Cinema in Nine Movements, by Suzanne Gauch. Review of Middle East Studies 52, no. 2 (2019): pp. 378-380.

Encyclopedia Articles

  • Al-Akharun (2006; Saba Al-Herz).” Global Encyclopedia of Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, and Queer (LGBTQ) History. Howard Chiang, Anjali Arondekar, Marc Epprecht, Jennifer Evans, Ross G. Forman, Hanadi Al-Samman, et al, eds. (Farmington Hills, MI: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 2019).

Teaching Awards

  • The Diane R. Leonard Award for Outstanding Foreign Language Instruction in the Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019

Awards

  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Standard Arabic and Moroccan Dialect in Fes, Morocco, Summer 2018.
  • Foreign Language Area Scholarship, African Studies: Arabic, Summer 2016.

Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests include twentieth-century American literature, women’s and gender studies, queer of color critique, and animal studies. She has completed two peer-reviewed publications: one explores Black feminist theories of embodiment and nature in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, forthcoming from Society & Animals; and the other offers an archival analysis of Zora Neale Hurston’s brief tenure at UNC and NCCU, published by North Carolina Literary Review in May 2020. Rachel also co-directs the graduate working group Literature, Medicine and Culture Colloquium (LMCC) which explores topics in health humanities. Finally, Rachel regularly teaches courses in rhetoric and composition, LGBTQIA+ literature and culture, and the history of horror literature and cinema. She is currently working on her dissertation, a literary and cultural history of female masculinity in American modernism.

 


Publications:

“Zora Neale Hurston in North Carolina: Drama, Education, and Contemporary Activism.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 29, August 2020.

“‘A Winged but Grounded Bird’: Morrison’s Mixed Treatment of Animality in The Bluest Eye.” Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies. (forthcoming spring 2021)

“A Crisis in (Female) Masculinity: My Ántonia & the Imaginative Recreation of the Western Frontier.” The Routledge Companion to Masculinity in American Literature and Culture, edited by Lydia Cooper and Joana Conings. (forthcoming spring 2021)

““The Poems and the Dances of the Shades’: Destabilizing Psychological Theories of Grief in The Year of Magical Thinking.” Death Within the Text: Social, Philosophical and Aesthetic Approaches to Literature, edited by Adriana Teodorescu (2018): 10-27.


Awards

Eliason Dissertation Summer Research Fellowship, 2020

MLA COVID-19 Emergency Grant, Modern Language Association, 2020

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2020

Paul Green Prize, North Carolina Literary Review, 2019

Student Learning Circle Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2019

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2018

Deborah W. Shelton Endowment for Graduate Travel Awards, ECL Department, 2018

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2017

Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Awards Fund, 2016

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2016


Marcy Pedzwater

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA Literature, BA Spanish, University of North Carolina Asheville

Bio

Marcy Pedzwater studies twentieth and twenty-first century North and Latin American literature. Her current research focuses on the intersections of race, gender, and colonialism/imperialism in Post-dictatorship literature of the Americas. She is also interested in the function of memory, archive, and trauma in these texts. She teaches English 105, Spanish 105, and Spanish 203.


Publications:

  • Review of Forms of Dictatorship: Power, Narrative, and Authoritarianism in the Latina/o Novel, by Jennifer Harford Vargas, Chiricú, Fall 2019.
  • “Thinking with José Revueltas and Roberto Bolaño: Philosophical Literary Approaches to Latin America.” Review of José Revueltas y Roberto Bolaño: Formas genéricas de la experiencia by Alejandro Sánchez Lopera, A Contracorriente, vol. 15, no. 3, Spring 2018.
  •  “Not of this World: Divine Radical Inclusivity as a Foil to Worldly Wisdom in Flannery O’Connor’s The Violent Bear It Away,The Sigma Tau Delta Review, vol. 14, Sigma Tau Delta, Spring 2017.