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Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemological mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies but are also foundational to the printing of early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Specialized Composition, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019

Awards

  • Lindemann Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Spring 2020
  • Folger Shakespeare Library, Grant-in-aid, Book Theory Weekend Seminar, taught by Juliet Fleming, 2019
  • Huntington Library, Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow, 2018
  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Year-Long Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish & Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems,” Literature and Belief 37.2, 2017. 45-61.

“Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry,” The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes. Winter 2016-17.

Reference Article

“Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake,” in Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, ed. Professor April London (Cambridge University Press), forthcoming.


Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael J. Clark

April 6, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Colby College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill. As a comparatist, I’ve studied Italian, Spanish, ancient Greek, Latin, Old English, Irish, and French, and my research interests include Renaissance literature, theatre studies, the history of medicine, classical receptions, translation studies, writing center studies, and pedagogy.

My dissertation “Deceptive Medicine and (Dis)Trust in Renaissance Drama” examines interactions between patients and medical practitioners in English, Italian, and French Renaissance comedies. The project explores how questions of trust and distrust in medical authority are reflected and dramatized in Renaissance theater.

My cross-disciplinary teaching experience has included Italian language courses, first-year composition courses, and literature survey courses. I also served for four years as a coach at the UNC Writing Center, providing one-on-one writing feedback and sharing composition strategies with more than 1000 unique students.

When not teaching, writing, or conducting research, I like to travel the world and to sing in a local community chorus.


Teaching Awards

  • CIRTL Associate Level, 2022
  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, 2020
  • McLendon-Thomas Award in the History of Medicine, 2018
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid, 2015

Awards

  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, 2020
  • McLendon-Thomas Award in the History of Medicine, 2018
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid, 2015

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin J. Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania with a BA in English and German and a creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My dissertation, “Royal Democrats: American Dignity and the Aristocratic Impulse,” traces the nineteenth-century development of the concept of “dignity” from its origins in aristocratic exclusivity to its later association with democratic equality. I argue that a racialized logic of rank and status remains a central component of this process and underlies how many Americans conceptualize democracy. By recognizing the instability and uneven development of American ideas of dignity and democracy, we can better understand why they remain such important yet contested concepts in U.S. politics today.


Publications:

  • “‘To continue their illustrious breed’: Aristocracy, Democracy, and the Search for Dignity in The House of the Seven Gables.The Nathaniel Hawthorne Review, vol. 47 (Fall 2021). Forthcoming.
  • “Digging Up Emerson’s Garden: Competing Notions of Transcendentalist Temporality in The Dial,” American Notes and Queries (2021). Forthcoming in print. Online: https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/0895769X.2021.1933372.
  • Review of The Introspective Art of Mark Twain by Douglas Anderson. American Literary Realism, vol. 51, no. 2 (Winter 2019), pp. 187-188.
  • “Nature in American Realism and Romanticism and the Problem with Genre.” Valley Humanities Review, vol. 6 (Spring 2015).

Awards

  • The Dr. Nancy C. Joyner Summer Research Fellowship, Graduate School, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2021)
  • Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Professional Development Award, Writing Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2019)
  • Roy C. Moose Graduate Student Travel Grant, Department of English & Comparative Literature, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill (2017, 2018)
  • Agnes Boyle O’Donnell Literature Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)
  • The Dr. George R. Struble Memorial Award, Department of English, Lebanon Valley College (2015)

Curriculum Vitae / Resume