Dwight Tanner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

 

Bio

Dwight Tanner is a Ph.D. candidate in English at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. He is the recipient of a Charlotte W. Newcombe Dissertation Fellowship for 2019-2020. Dwight works in 21st century American/British literature with a focus on Ethnic Literatures and Critical Race Theory. His current research focuses on minoritarian identity and conceptions/rhetorics of change in apocalyptic narratives. He also studies posthumanism, speculative fiction, environmental humanism, and drama and performance theory.


Publications:

  • Refereed Journal Article
    • 2019  “‘She Forgot’: Obscuring White Privilege and Colorblindness in Harper Lee’s Novels” South Atlantic Review. 84.1 (March 2019): 54-71.
  • Book Review
    •  2020  Review of Beth Lew Williams. The Chinese Must Go: Violence, Exclusion, and the Making of the Alien in America. Harvard University Press,  2018. In Journal of Asian American Studies (2020). Forthcoming February 2020.

Teaching Awards

  • Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching First Year Composition (2015)

Awards

  • 2019-20  Charlotte W. Newcombe Doctoral Dissertation Fellowship, The Woodrow Wilson National Fellowship Foundation
  • 2019   Graduate Tuition Incentive Scholarship, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019  Graduate Student International Travel Grant, The Graduate School, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Kenan Graduate Fellowship, College of Arts and Sciences, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018  Summer Dissertation Research Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2018  Baxter Grant, American Studies Association
  • 2018  CSA Travel Grant, Center for the Study of the American South, The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017  Institute for the Arts and Humanities Collaboration Grant, UNC Institute for the Arts and Humanities
  • 2015  Gaskin Award for Excellence in Teaching, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature
  • 2013  Booker Fellowship, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemologial mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies, but are also foundational to early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Awards

  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow at the Huntington Library, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Shakespeare Association of America Graduate Student Travel Award, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass. 2017
  • Bibliographical Society of America Scholarship for travel to “Bibliography Among the Disciplines,” 2017
  • Association for Computers and the Humanities Travel Bursary to Digital Humanities Summer Institute, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI: Critical Documentary and Genetic Editing taught by Elena Pierazzo and Peter Stokes, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish and Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, 2017
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, 2016
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book: Technology and Texts, 2016
  • Pre-Dissertation Travel Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Kimberly Farris

April 16, 2018

Degrees

2013, M.A. English, The University of Alabama

2010, B.A. English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Kimberly Farris is a doctoral candidate who studies nineteenth-century American literature at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation examines authors’ positions on the nineteenth-century sciences and plots how literature was used to espouse an approach to practicing the sciences that incorporates both intuitive and empirical forms of knowledge. She explores how authors used fiction as a means to interrogate feminine scientific education, alternative medical practices, and the breakdown of species posited by evolutionary theorists. Her most recent dissertation chapter explores Harriet Prescott Spofford’s creation of hybrid plant-ladies as a means of engaging Darwinian evolution and scientific materialism.


Teaching Awards

  • Peer Mentoring Committee Excellence in Teaching Literature Award, 2017

Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2018
  • Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW), 2nd place in the Graduate Student Paper Award, 2015
  • Robert Bain Award, UNC Chapel Hill, 2015
  • Julius Sylvester Hanner Memorial Fellowship, UNC Chapel Hill, 2013
  • Graduate Council Fellowship, The University of Alabama, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

  • Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry. (The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes, Issue 1, Winter 2016-17).
  • Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems. (Literature and Belief, Forthcoming, Spring 2018).
  • Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake. (The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel1660-1820, Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael J. Clark

April 6, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Colby College

Bio

Michael J. Clark is a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature at UNC-Chapel Hill who specializes in Renaissance drama. In his dissertation, Michael examines how trust and distrust between patients and physicians are depicted in Italian, English, and French Renaissance comedy.

As a comparatist, Michael has studied Italian, Spanish, ancient Greek, Latin, Old English, and Irish, but his primary literatures are English and Italian. His research interests include Renaissance literature, the history of medicine, classical reception, performance studies, translation studies, and pedagogy.

At UNC, Michael’s teaching experience has been cross-disciplinary and has included Italian language courses, first-year composition courses, and introductory literature courses. In addition to these teaching responsibilities, Michael has served as a coach at the UNC Writing Center.

When not teaching, writing, or conducting research, Michael likes to travel and to sing.


Teaching Awards

  • Literature Teaching Award, 2016
  • Foreign Language Teaching Award, 2016
  • Engaged Instructor Award, 2015

Awards

  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2017

Martin Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD student in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania in 2015 with a BA in English and German, and creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My research interests are centered around the destabilization of nationalism and time in 19th century American literature.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume