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Jane McGrail

April 25, 2019

Degrees

2017, BA English, College of the Holy Cross

Bio

Jane McGrail is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Composition, and Literacy Studies. Her research interests include the public humanities, cultural rhetorics, feminisms and rhetorics, community literacy studies, and engaged pedagogy.


Abigail Lee

December 5, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.F.A. Poetry Writing, University of North Carolina — Greensboro

2008, B.A. English, University of Virginia — Charlottesville

Bio

Abigail studies contemporary multiethnic literatures, with a focus on TV, film, music videos, and digital media. She holds an MFA in poetry writing and has taught courses in composition, American literature, and contemporary poetry.


Publications:

  • “Blue can be a place/ please can it be a place” finalist for 2015-2016 Mid-American Review James Wright Prize, Vol 36, no. 2 (spring 2016).
  • “somebody or other pretended a revelation” in Prairie Schooner, vol. 90, no. 3 (fall 2016).
  • “and while he told the sands of his hour-glass, or the throbs and little beatings of his watch” in Bayou Magazine, vol. 65 (fall/winter 2016).
  • “The library of July” in CALYX, vol. 29, no. 1 (winter 2016).
  • “Two Face reads that batman has returned” in Barrow Street, (winter 2014).

Awards

  • Humanities for the Public Good, Professional Pathways Award, project developing curricula for UNC correctional education courses, summer 2018
  • Richard Bland Fellowship, Center for the Study of the American South, summer 2017

Margaret Maurer

November 19, 2018

Degrees

2015, M.Phil. Medieval and Renaissance Literature, Cambridge University

2014, Pedagogy, Brooklyn College (non-degree)

2013, A.B. English Literature & Theater, Brown University

Bio

Margaret Maurer’s research focuses on sixteenth- and seventeenth-century literature and science, especially alchemy and chymistry. She explores the interaction between literature and science through manuscript and print culture, the material book, and book history.


Publications:

  • “‘The undiscovered country’: Shakespeare, Star Trek, and Intertextual Narratives in Station Eleven,” Foundation: The International Review of Science Fiction (vol. 48, issue 134, p. 32-44), November 2019.
  • “Receiving Alchemical Knowledge”The Recipes Project, 2018.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award, UNC Chancellor’s Awards, Spring 2021
  • Erika Lindemann Award for Demonstrated Excellence in Teaching, UNC English and Comparative Literature Department, Spring 2020
  • Professional Development Award, UNC Writing Program, Fall 2018-Spring 2021

Awards

  • Dean’s Fellowship, UNC Medieval and Early Modern Studies, Spring 2022
  • Off-Campus Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, Fall 2021
  • Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Grant, Studies in Philology, Spring 2020
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Research Grant, UNC MEMS, Spring 2020
  • Pre-Dissertation Exploration Award, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, Spring 2020
  • The Languages of Nature: Science, Literature, and the Imagination Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, September 2019
  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award for Outstanding Record in the First Year of Graduate Study, UNC Department of English and Comparative Literature, August 2018
  • A Folger Orientation to Research Methods and Agendas Travel Grant, Folger Shakespeare Library, May 2018
  • Incubator Award, UNC-Chapel Hill Libraries, 2018
  • Digital Rolls and Fragments Graduate Workshop, Beineike Library, November 2017
  • Medieval and Early Modern Studies Small Research Grant, UNC MEMS, 2017
  • Millie Helen Hicks Premium, Brown University, 2013

Leslie Rowen

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA English, Bellarmine University

2017, BA Spanish, Bellarmine Univesity

Bio

Leslie Rowen studies 20th Century American literature with a focus on the literature of war. Her research concentrates on under-studied soldier writing, with a particular interest in race, gender expression, and trauma. By nature this work relies heavily on the archive, and occasionally extends into the field of medical humanities.


Teaching Awards

  • Professional Development Teaching Award, Department of English & Comparative Literature, Spring 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award, Fall 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, Summer 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • James Peacock REACH Fellowship, Center for Global Initiatives, Summer 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Nikki Roulo

August 13, 2018

Degrees

2017, M. A. Pennsylvania State University

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses primarily upon early modern literature and in particular, the intersections of poetics and performance, the fool figure, ballads and politics. My dissertation, “Changeling Humorists: The Speech Acts of the Early Modern English Fool,” traces the intellectual history of the fool figure through the seventeenth century. It explores how the fool democratizes an access to public voice and transfers a form of sovereignty to its audience. Currently, I am also editing Robert Armin’s Quips upon Questions for Digital Renaissance Editions.


Publications:

  • Robert Armin, Quips upon Questions, in Digital Renaissance Editions. University of Victoria.
  • Review of Worthen, W. B. Shakespeare, Technicity and the Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2020. In Shakespeare Quarterly (forthcoming).
  • Review of Henze, Catherine. Robert Armin and Shakespeare’s Performed Songs. New York: Routledge Press, 2017. In Renaissance Quarterly. 71 No. 4 (2018): 1554-1555.
  • Review of  Marno, David. Death Be Not Proud: The Art of Holy Attention. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2016. In Journal for Early Modern Cultural Studies 18 No. 2 (2018): 175-177.

Teaching Awards

  • 2020 Latina/o Studies Teaching Award, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Awards

External 

  • 2020       UCLA Clark Library/Center for Seventeenth-and Eighteenth-Century Studies Predoctoral Fellowship
  • 2019       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       Jerry Leath Mills Research Travel Fellowship, Studies in Philology
  • 2018       Conference Bursary, British Shakespeare Association
  • 2018       NEMLA Graduate Student Travel Grant

Internal

  • 2021       Howell-Voitle Award for Dissertation in Early Modern English, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Department of English and Comparative Literature Summer Dissertation Fellowship,  University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2021       Medieval and Early Modern Summer Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Eliason Dissertation Research Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2020       Medieval and Early Modern Society Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2019       The Graduate and Professional Student Federation Travel Grant, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2018       Travel Grant, Graduate School of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • 2017       Wilma Ebbitt Fellowship in Rhetoric, Pennsylvania State University, University Park

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Matthew Scott Duncan

August 8, 2018

Degrees

BA English, Clemson University

Bio

Matt Duncan is a second-year PhD student and teaching fellow at the UNC Chapel Hill. His research explores the unique role of digital tools in shaping the composition classroom, with an emphasis on a low-bridge approach to the application of technology in writing curriculum. He is also Co-Editor of Fiction for Carolina Quarterly and is a Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative Project Management Fellow.


Awards

  • CDHI Project Management Fellowship
  • CDHI Recruitment Fellowship
  • Fred W. Shilstone Memorial Award
  • Lucy K. Rollins Award

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Mary Learner

April 22, 2018

Degrees

2012, M.A. English Literature, University of South Carolina
2010,  B.A. English and Psychology, University of South Carolina Honors College

Bio

I’m a Ph.D. candidate in the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. My research focuses on early modern literature, women’s literacies, book history, and digital humanities. My dissertation, “Material Sampling and Patterns of Thought in Early Modern England,” explores sampling as an epistemological mode in the seventeenth century. This project considers how samples and patterns are essential to material typically associated with women’s literacies but are also foundational to the printing of early Royal Society experiments. I also work as a project assistant at the William Blake Archive.

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Specialized Composition, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2019

Awards

  • Lindemann Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Spring 2020
  • Folger Shakespeare Library, Grant-in-aid, Book Theory Weekend Seminar, taught by Juliet Fleming, 2019
  • Huntington Library, Fletcher Jones Foundation Fellow, 2018
  • Harry Ransom Center Research Fellowship in the Humanities, 2018
  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, 2018
  • Summer Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School, 2018
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Researching the Archive Year-Long Seminar taught by Ann Blair and Peter Stallybrass, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Digital Editing with TEI, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Cavendish & Hutchinson Seminar taught by Julie Crawford, 2017
  • Digital Innovation Research and Dissertation Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, 2017
  • Digital Humanities Summer Institute Tuition Scholarship, Understanding the Predigital Book, 2016
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-aid, Mastering Research Seminar taught by Robert Matz, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles

“Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems,” Literature and Belief 37.2, 2017. 45-61.

“Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry,” The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes. Winter 2016-17.

Reference Article

“Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake,” in Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel, 1660-1820, ed. Professor April London (Cambridge University Press), forthcoming.


Teaching Awards

  • C. S. Herschel Award for Course Design, English 105i: Business Composition and Rhetoric, Fall 2019
  • Professional Development Award, Department of English and Comparative Literature, Fall 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Michael J. Clark

April 6, 2018

Degrees

2011, BA English, Colby College

Bio

I am a PhD candidate in Comparative Literature and a Graduate Teaching Fellow at UNC-Chapel Hill. As a comparatist, I’ve studied Italian, Spanish, ancient Greek, Latin, Old English, Irish, and French, and my research interests include Renaissance literature, the history of medicine, theater studies, translation studies, classical reception, writing center studies, and pedagogy.

My dissertation “Deceptive Medicine and (Dis)Trust in Renaissance Drama” examines interactions between patients and medical practitioners in English, Italian, and French Renaissance comedies. The project explores how questions of trust and distrust in medical authority are reflected and dramatized in Renaissance theater.

My cross-disciplinary teaching experience has included Italian language courses, first-year composition courses, and literature survey courses. I also served for four years as a coach at the UNC Writing Center, providing one-on-one writing feedback and sharing composition strategies with more than 1000 unique students.

When not teaching, writing, or conducting research, I like to travel the world and to sing in a local community chorus.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2019
  • Literature Teaching Award, 2016
  • Foreign Language Teaching Award, 2016
  • Engaged Instructor Award, 2015

Awards

  • Howell-Voitle Dissertation Award, 2020
  • McLendon-Thomas Award in the History of Medicine, 2018
  • Future Faculty Fellowship Program, 2017
  • Folger Shakespeare Library Grant-in-Aid, 2015

Curriculum Vitae / Resume