Kenneth Jude Lota

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, University of Virginia

2010, BA English, Tulane University

Bio

Kenneth is a specialist in 20th- and 21st-century American fiction, with interests in genre, film, and the literary moment after postmodernism. His dissertation focuses on the re-invention of the tropes of film noir and hard-boiled crime fiction of the 1930s and 40s in mainstream contemporary American literature. His solo-taught literature classes so far have included a version of the Contemporary Literature class titled “Alternatives to Realism” and a version of the Popular Genres class focused on detective fiction, science fiction, graphic novels, horror, and children’s literature. He managed to successfully teach House of Leaves in a 100-level undergraduate class. In his spare time, he has written reviews of over 1,000 films.


Publications:

  • “Cool Girls and Bad Girls: Reinventing the Femme Fatale in Contemporary American Fiction.” Interdisciplinary Humanities 33.1 (Spring 2016): 150 – 170.

Awards

  • 2017 Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship
  • 2010 Senior Scholar Award in English, Tulane University

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Grant Glass

April 23, 2018

Degrees

May 2013, B.A. Literature, with Honors. Harvard University Extension, Cambridge, Mass.

Jan 2016, M.A. Digital Humanities with Merit. King’s College London, U.K.

2013, Attended the Graduate School of Arts and Sciences, Harvard University, Cambridge, Mass. Special Student Status studying English literature.

Bio

Grant Glass is a  graduate student at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill in the English and Comparative Literature Department and is a Graduate Fellow of the Bass Connections Program at Duke University. His project, Pirating Texts traces the thousands of pirated, republished, abridged, imitated, and translated editions of Daniel Defoe’s The Life and Surprising Adventures of Robinson Crusoe (1719) to show how these various editions often reflect the place and time of their production and consumption. By maping these editions in their respective time/space configurations, we can begin to further our understanding of how the expanse and collapse of the British Empire is wrapped up in notions of capitalism, race, empire, gender, and climate concerns. Currently, he is the Assistant Project Manager of the William Blake Archive and the Assistant Director of the Digital Literacy and Communication Lab.


Publications:

  • “Chapter 5: Digital Literacy” Tar Heel Writing Guide 2017-2018. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. 2017.
  • “After Latinidad: Reimagining Latino Identity in the Works of Junot Díaz.” URJHS: Undergraduate Research Journal for the Human Sciences. Vol. 12, 2013.
  • “Disruptive Reading: Resistance to Digitalization in Laurence Stern’s Tristram Shandy and Jonathan Safran Foer’s Tree of Codes.” University of California Berkeley Comparative Literature Journal. Vol. 4 Issue 3, 2013.

Teaching Awards

  • Student Undergraduate Teaching Award,Office of the Chancellor, UNC-CH, $1000. 2019.
  • C.S. Herschel Award for Course Design, Digital Humanities, University Writing Program, UNC-CH, $250. 2019.
  • Syllabus of the Year-with Professor Jeanne Moskal, Office of Instructional Innovation, UNC-CH. 2018.
  • Graduate Student Mentor Award, Office for Undergraduate Research, UNC-CH. 2018.

Awards

  • Rhodes Data Initiative Bass Connections Graduate Fellowship, Duke University. $17,500, 2019-2020.
  • Frank Porter Graham Honor Society Member, UNC-CH Graduate School, UNC-CH. 2019
  • Lenovo Instructional Innovation Grant with Dan Anderson, Center for Faculty Excellence, UNC-CH, $8000. 2018.
  • Director’s Scholarship, Rare Books School, Univ. of Virginia. $1500, 2018.
  • Digital Literacy Fellowship, Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $5000, 2017-2018.
  • Delmas Scholar,Society for the History of Authorship, Reading and Publishing. $800, 2017.
  • Digital Research and Dissertation Fellowship,Carolina Digital Humanities Initiative, UNC-CH. $4000, 2016-2017.
  • Hanner Fellowship, Dept. of English and Comparative Lit., UNC-CH. $17500, 2015-2016.

Kevin Wood Pyon

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2015, MA English, Appalachian State University

2010, BS Secondary English Education, Piedmont International University

2010, BA English, High Point University

Bio

Kevin Pyon’s research interests include African American history, religion, music, and literature. His current dissertation project explores 18th and 19th century African American literature through the lens of the black radical tradition. Through a re-configuration of traditional Marxist literary theory, it seeks to discover in early black autobiography and fiction what might be called the “racial unconscious” of capitalism itself–that is, the ways that the racial structure(s) of 19th century American capitalism (in both the slave South and industrial North) are thematically and formally manifested in the narratives and novels of black authors of the era.


Publications:

  • “Towards an African-American Genealogy of Market and Religion in Rap Music.” Popular Music and Society. Online ahead of print (April 2018): 1-22. https://doi.org/10.1080/03007766.2018.1458275

Awards

  • Ruth Rose Richardson Award, UNC, Fall 2016
  • Blyden and Roberta Jackson Fellowship in Afro-American Literature, UNC, 2015-2016
  • Cratis D. Williams Society Inductee, Appalachian State U, 2015

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Contact

email |

Office: Dey Hall 339

Kimberly Farris

April 16, 2018

Degrees

2013, M.A. English, The University of Alabama

2010, B.A. English, Birmingham-Southern College

Bio

Kimberly Farris is a doctoral candidate who studies nineteenth-century American literature at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her dissertation examines authors’ positions on the nineteenth-century sciences and plots how literature was used to espouse an approach to practicing the sciences that incorporates both intuitive and empirical forms of knowledge. She explores how authors used fiction as a means to interrogate feminine scientific education, alternative medical practices, and the breakdown of species posited by evolutionary theorists. Her most recent dissertation chapter explores Harriet Prescott Spofford’s creation of hybrid plant-ladies as a means of engaging Darwinian evolution and scientific materialism.


Teaching Awards

  • Peer Mentoring Committee Excellence in Teaching Literature Award, 2017

Awards

  • UNC Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2018
  • Society for the Study of American Women Writers (SSAWW), 2nd place in the Graduate Student Paper Award, 2015
  • Robert Bain Award, UNC Chapel Hill, 2015
  • Julius Sylvester Hanner Memorial Fellowship, UNC Chapel Hill, 2013
  • Graduate Council Fellowship, The University of Alabama, 2011

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Elisa Faison

April 10, 2018

Degrees

2011, Bachelor of Arts in English, Sewanee: The University of the South

Bio

Elisa is a PhD candidate and Teaching Fellow. She is currently writing a dissertation entitled “Domesticating the Apocalypse: Motherhood and the Novel at the End of Time.”


Publications:

  • Faison, Elisa. Rev. of The Lightkeepers by Abby Geni. Carolina Quarterly 67.1 (Fall/Winter 2017).

Awards

  • Graduate School Summer Research Fellowship, 2018

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Carlie Wetzel

April 9, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Colgate University

Bio

Carlie Wetzel studies British literature from the long nineteenth century, focusing on elegiac poetry.


Publications:

  • Age and Mourning: Complicating Grief with John Clare’s Gravesite Poetry. (The Gravestone Project: Grave Notes, Issue 1, Winter 2016-17).
  • Beauty after Death: Heaven as Consolation in Beebe Eyre’s Miscellaneous Poems. (Literature and Belief, Forthcoming, Spring 2018).
  • Critical summary of The Life and Extraordinary Adventures, the Perils and Critical Escapes of Timothy Ginnadrake. (The Cambridge Guide to the Eighteenth-Century Novel1660-1820, Forthcoming, Fall 2018).

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Martin Groff

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2015, BA English and German, Lebanon Valley College

Bio

I am a PhD student in the English and Comparative Literature department at UNC – Chapel Hill. I graduated from Lebanon Valley College in Pennsylvania in 2015 with a BA in English and German, and creative writing minor. I began in the graduate program at UNC in Fall 2015. My research interests are centered around the destabilization of nationalism and time in 19th century American literature.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume