James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a doctoral student in English and Teaching Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Her work lies at the intersection of queer and transgender studies, poststructuralist feminist theorizing, and American culture studies. She is particularly interested in representations of non-normative gendered embodiments and transgressive sexualities in 20th century multiethnic American literature. In May of 2017, Rachel received the Winchester Fellowship from her alma mater to prepare for comprehensive exams and conduct preliminary research for her prospectus. She has also worked in the emerging field of health humanities by helping convene the 2016 Health Humanities Exchange conference at UNC-CH and serving as director of the of Literature, Medicine, and Culture Colloquium for the 2016-2017 academic year.

 


Emilio Jesus Taiveaho Pelaez

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2017 BA English & Latin American Studies, University of Wisconsin – Eau Claire

Bio

emilio jesús taiveaho peláez is a PhD. candidate through the Department of English and Comparative Literature at the University of North Carolina – Chapel Hill. Emilio’s dissertation, Ojos de Hierba: Walt Whitman’s Children & the American Lyric, probes the shared literary and philosophical history of the Américas as expressed in the work of figures such as José Martí, Federico García Lorca, Allen Ginsberg, and Nestor Perlongher. As a practicing poet, their work engages the intersection of aesthetic experience and political discipline, blending critical, creative, and archival inquiry.


Awards

  • 2017 – Present: Mellon Fellow

Sean DiLeonardi

April 10, 2018

Degrees

M.A. University of Colorado, Boulder

B.A. Illinois State University

Bio

Sean DiLeonardi teaches and writes broadly about contemporary American literature and its relationship to race, technology, science, and media. Drawing from an interdisciplinary mix of literary criticism, media theory, and science/technology studies, Sean’s research catalogues the effects of new technologies on literary form and, inversely, literary culture’s role in shaping American discourse on race, science, and digitality.

 

Sean is currently preparing a dissertation that traces an epistemological shift in scientific and literary ideas about probability in the American midcentury. The dissertation argues that an array of new media—from digital translators to the first major English translation of the I Ching—automates probability, thus inspiring a set of formal innovations in both scientific and literary narratives. 

 

Chair, 2017-18 Boundaries of Literature Symposium

Co-editor, Ethos Review (http://www.ethosreview.org/)

Co-organizer, the Americanist Speaker Series, in collaboration with Duke English


Publications:

  • “Cryptographic Reading: Machine Translation, the New Criticism, and Nabokov’s Pnin,” Post45: Peer-Reviewed (forthcoming)

Awards

  • Dean’s Graduate Fellowship. Dean’s Office, College of Arts and Sciences, 2018-19.
  • Carl Hartsell Award for Teaching Excellence. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2018
  • Research Fellowship. The Graduate School, UNC, Spring 2018.
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship. Carolina Public Humanities, 2017-18.
  • Robert Bain Award. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2016.
  • Digital Media Internship. SITES Laboratory, UNC, 2015-16.
  • Travel Grant. Dept. of English and Comparative Literature, UNC, 2014.
  • Travel Grant. United Gov. for Graduate Students, UC Boulder, 2013.
  • Brome Creative Writing Award. English Dept., ISU, 2007.
  • Associated Bank National Scholarship. 2003.

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jessica Slavic Drexel

April 5, 2018

Degrees

2014, MA Linguistics, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

2012, BA German & Latin, Hillsdale College

Bio

I am a comparative modernist scholar specializing in Anglo-American and European poetry and poetics. My dissertation focuses on the poetic epiphany in modernist and secular aesthetic frameworks in Anglo-American and German traditions, with particular attention given to William Carlos Williams, T. S. Eliot, and Rainer Maria Rilke. My analytical framework draws on literary, religious, and philosophical traditions as I examine the phenomenon of the secular epiphany in the twentieth century. In addition to my research, I recently received an award for excellence in teaching English rhetoric and composition at UNC. For this class, I employ a genre-awareness approach that emphasizes interdisciplinary skills such as research, developing a writing process through peer review and revision, and digital literacy; I have particularly enjoyed developing units on film analysis and career readiness.


Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindeman Teaching Award for Composition and Literature, 2017

Curriculum Vitae / Resume