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Benjamin J Murphy

May 6, 2019

Degrees

B.A, Humanities, Houghton College. Houghton, NY. 2014 

Bio

I am a Ph.D. candidate in English and 2020 Mellon/ACLS Dissertation Completion Fellow at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where I study American literature of the long nineteenth century (1830-1914). My research focuses on prose narratives (fiction and non-fiction) in relation to science, critical theory, biopolitics, and race. More broadly, too, I am interested in genre fiction (especially horror, science fiction, and weird fiction), intellectual and social history, and the history of science.

My dissertation centers on literature and discourses of crowd psychology at the turn of the century. Considering novels, short stories, essays, and scientific writing, I argue that American writers between the end of Reconstruction and the start of WWI found in the complicated notion of the crowd a means to justify as well as to resist racial inequality.

My research is published or forthcoming in American Literature, Configurations, and Mississippi Quarterly. Other writing, including essays and reviews, appears with The MillionsPopMatters, boundary2 online, symplokeGulf Coast, Full Stop, and The Carolina Quarterly. (Visit my website for links to my writing.)

As a Teaching Fellow in the English department, I regularly teach courses in composition and rhetoric. I have also taught ENGL 128: Major American Authors, ENGL 144: Popular Genres, served as a Teaching Assistant for ENGL 268: Literature, Medicine, and Culture, and been a Graduate Research Consultant for ENGL 344: Literature of the American West and CMPL 142: Visual Culture. 

Additionally, I have served in various editorial positions and am currently an editorial assistant for the journal American Literature. 


Publications:

  • “‘Multiplied without Number’: Lynching, Statistics, and Visualization in Ida B. Wells, Mark Twain, and WEB Du Bois” American Literature 92.3 (Spring 2021): forthcoming
  • Not So New Materialism: Homeostasis Revisited” Configurations: A Journal of Literature, Science, and Technology 27.1 (Winter 2019) Forthcoming
  • “The Lasting Impressions of Biopower,” Review of Kyla Schuller’s The Biopolitics of Feeling: Race, Sex, and Science in the Nineteenth Century [Duke University Press, 2018] symploke 26.1 (Forthcoming 2018)
  • “Exceptional Infidelity: James Dickey’s Deliverance, Film Adaptation, and the Postsouthern”Mississippi Quarterly 69.2 (Spring 2016) [Published Summer 2018]
  • “The Universes of Speculative Realism,” Review of Steven Shaviro’s The Universe of Things: On Speculative Realism [University of Minnesota Press, 2014] boundary 2: b2o review (June 1, 2017) Web

Teaching Awards

  • Erika Lindemann Teaching Award in Composition and Literature, 2018
  • Tanner Award for Excellence in Undergraduate Teaching, 2018
  • Student Undergraduate Teaching and Staff Award (SUTSA), 2017

Awards

  • ACLS/Mellon Dissertation Completion Fellowship, 2020-2021
  • Quarry Farm Short-Term Fellowship, Center for Mark Twain Studies, 2020
  • Maynard Adams Fellowship for the Public Humanities, UNC Public Humanities 2019-2020
  • Hobby Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Department of English, Fall Semester, 2019
  • Summer Research Dissertation Fellowship, UNC Graduate School,  2019

  • Best Graduate Student Essay, South Atlantic MLA (SAMLA), 2016


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jordan Klevdal

February 1, 2019

Degrees

2011, BA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

2018, MA English, University of Colorado at Boulder

Bio

I am interested in questions which look at memory and nostalgia and the way in which shifts in technology, political borders and intellectual thought have changed literature’s relationship to both. I’m broadly interested in modernism, 20th century literature, immigrant literature, memory studies, materiality, gender and sexuality, Jewish studies, the interplay of image and language, and critical theory.


Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Jessica Ginocchio

October 16, 2018

Degrees

2016, M.A.T. Secondary English Education, Duke University

2013, M.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

2011, B.A. Slavic Languages and Literatures, UNC-Chapel Hill

Bio

Jessica’s research focuses on late 19th and early 20th century Russian and German fiction, with special interests in the depictions of animals and death in literature. Key authors for her include Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Kafka, and Mann. She has been studying Russian since 2007 and has studied in St. Petersburg, Moscow, and Kiev. She has taught Russian language courses and TA’d for Russian and German culture courses in the Department of Germanic and Slavic Languages and Literatures, as well as tutors for the new UNC Russian Flagship Program.

 

 


Awards

  • UNC CSEEES Summer Research & Language Study Award, 2021
  • FLAS Fellowship, Summer 2012 (Russian)

Leslie Rowen

October 2, 2018

Degrees

2017, BA English, Bellarmine University

2017, BA Spanish, Bellarmine Univesity

Bio

Leslie Rowen studies 20th Century American literature with a focus on the literature of war. Her research concentrates on under-studied soldier writing, with a particular interest in race, gender expression, and trauma. By nature this work relies heavily on the archive, and occasionally extends into the field of medical humanities.


Teaching Awards

  • Professional Development Teaching Award, Department of English & Comparative Literature, Spring 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Latina/o Studies Program Teaching Award, Fall 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Awards

  • Center for the Study of the American South Summer Research Grant, Summer 2021, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • James Peacock REACH Fellowship, Center for Global Initiatives, Summer 2020, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill 

Curriculum Vitae / Resume

Benjamin Kylan Rice

September 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, Brigham Young University

2017, MFA Creative Writing, Colorado State University

Bio

Kylan Rice studies nineteenth and twentieth-century American poetry and poetics.


Publications:

Books:

Articles:

  • “A ‘Correspondence of Eyes with Eyes’: Edwin Arlington Robinson, Empathy, and Literary Naturalism,” CR: The New Centennial Review, vol. 20, no. 3, December 2020, pp. 179 – 205.
  • “‘In Couples, In Small Companies’: On Robert Duncan and Sentimental Modernism.” Arizona Quarterly: A Journal of American Literature, Culture, & Theory, vol. 76, no. 2, Summer 2020, pp. 87-113.
  • “‘Some Other’s Text’: Dan Beachy-Quick, Moby-Dick, and the Poetics of Reading.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, vol. 21, no. 2, June 2019, pp. 83-103.
  • “‘Light—enabling Light’: Emily Dickinson and the Apparatus of the Poet’s I.” Women’s Studies, vol. 47, no. 3, 2018, pp. 317-332.

Reviews:

  • “Review of Thick and Dazzling Darkness: Religious Poetry in a Secular Age by Peter O’Leary. Columbia University Press (2017).” Literature and Belief, Vol. 37, Issue 2, 2018.
  • “Review of Ornamental Aesthetics: The Poetry of Attending in Thoreau, Dickinson, & Whitman by Theo Davis. Oxford University Press 2016, 245 pp.” The Emily Dickinson International Society Bulletin, Vol. 29, No. 2, Fall 2017.
  • “6,852: Archipelagic Imagination at the Tenth International Melville Conference.” Leviathan: A Journal of Melville Studies, Vol. 18: Issue 1, 2016.

Awards

  • Early Stages Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Summer 2021
  • Bain Award for outstanding academic performance in the second year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2019
  • Ruth Richardson Award for outstanding academic performance in the first year of graduate study, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2018

Dylan Thompson

July 24, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English, University of Oregon

Bio

I study late medieval English and Italian literature, focusing primarily on the works of Dante and Chaucer. I’m also especially interested in folk music, vernacular and vulgar literary traditions, and religion.


Jordan Schroeder

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, BA English, University of Michigan

Bio

Jordan Schroeder is a PhD candidate studying global cinema and critical theory. Her research examines spectatorship and the essay film genre. More specifically, she focuses on the intersubjective space that the essay film genre exaggerates and explores, and the phenomenological experience of the spectator as he encounters that space.

Awards

  • Merit Graduate Fellow, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2012
  • University of North Carolina George Hills Harper Award, UNC-Chapel Hill, 2013

Lauren Pinkerton

April 23, 2018

Degrees

B.A., Plan II and English Honors, The University of Texas at Austin (2011)

Bio

English PhD student studying late nineteenth and early twentieth century British literature with a focus on the theory and history of knowledge, women’s writing, and novel studies.


Publications:

Peer-Reviewed Journal Articles:

  • “Archiving Dracula: Knowledge Acquisition and Interdisciplinarity,” Nineteenth-Century Contexts (forthcoming)

Edited Special Issues:

  • Guest co-editor, with Doreen Thierauf, Generational Exchange and Transition in Women’s Writing, special issue of Women’s Writing, vol. 26, no. 2, 2019.

Awards

  • Evan Frankel Departmental Dissertation Fellowship, UNC-Chapel Hill (2020)
  • Inductee, Frank Porter Graham Graduate and Professional Student Honor Society, UNC-Chapel Hill (2018)

James Cobb

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2012, MA English, Brandeis University.

2007, BA English and Philosophy, Columbia University.

Bio

My research interests are 20th and 21st Century Experimental Narratives, particularly African-American Fiction.


Rachel Warner

April 23, 2018

Degrees

2014, BA English & Psychology, Wesleyan University

Bio

Rachel Warner is a PhD candidate and teaching fellow in the Department of English and Comparative Literature. Her research interests include twentieth-century American literature, women’s and gender studies, queer of color critique, and animal studies. She has completed two peer-reviewed publications: one explores Black feminist theories of embodiment and nature in Toni Morrison’s The Bluest Eye, forthcoming from Society & Animals; and the other offers an archival analysis of Zora Neale Hurston’s brief tenure at UNC and NCCU, published by North Carolina Literary Review in May 2020. Rachel also co-directs the graduate working group Literature, Medicine and Culture Colloquium (LMCC) which explores topics in health humanities. Finally, Rachel regularly teaches courses in rhetoric and composition, LGBTQIA+ literature and culture, and the history of horror literature and cinema. She is currently working on her dissertation, a literary and cultural history of female masculinity in American modernism.

 


Publications:

“Zora Neale Hurston in North Carolina: Drama, Education, and Contemporary Activism.” North Carolina Literary Review, no. 29, August 2020.

“‘A Winged but Grounded Bird’: Morrison’s Mixed Treatment of Animality in The Bluest Eye.” Society & Animals: Journal of Human-Animal Studies. (forthcoming spring 2021)

“A Crisis in (Female) Masculinity: My Ántonia & the Imaginative Recreation of the Western Frontier.” The Routledge Companion to Masculinity in American Literature and Culture, edited by Lydia Cooper and Joana Conings. (forthcoming spring 2021)

““The Poems and the Dances of the Shades’: Destabilizing Psychological Theories of Grief in The Year of Magical Thinking.” Death Within the Text: Social, Philosophical and Aesthetic Approaches to Literature, edited by Adriana Teodorescu (2018): 10-27.


Awards

Eliason Dissertation Summer Research Fellowship, 2020

MLA COVID-19 Emergency Grant, Modern Language Association, 2020

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2020

Paul Green Prize, North Carolina Literary Review, 2019

Student Learning Circle Grant, UNC Center for Global Initiatives, 2019

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2018

Deborah W. Shelton Endowment for Graduate Travel Awards, ECL Department, 2018

Winchester Fellowship, Wesleyan University, 2017

Albrecht B. Strauss SAMLA Awards Fund, 2016

Graduate Student Travel Fund, ECL Department, 2016